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ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | October 4, 2007
So often, scotch bars are stuffy places where crusty old fat cats sip $40 shots and suck on big cigars. Yuck. That's what sets Birds of a Feather apart: It's a clean, smoke-free neighborhood scotch bar in Fells Point. And compared to other Baltimore watering holes, you rarely see the level of love and attention owner and sole bartender Alicia Horn puts into the place. Horn and her late husband, John, opened Birds of a Feather about 25 years ago as a restaurant and bar. They later scaled back from a full menu to light fare.
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2014
So much of my time is taken up with doctoring sick prose, and complaining here about suspect advice on grammar and usage, that I thought it might be salutary to take a look, for once, at some good prose.  Here is the opening paragraph from "Josie's Well," an article by John McPhee on Scotch whisky first published in Holiday  in 1970 and reprinted in his collection Pieces of the Frame. The text The Laphroaig distillery is on the southern shore of Islay, one of the isles of Argyll, in the Inner Hebrides.
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FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | May 22, 1997
ANNAPOLIS - Spring at the Naval Academy, and a plebe's affections turn to Calculus II and 200-meter swims leisurely performed in five mandatory minutes. Spring, and Bubba McKinney is still the laid-back brother. His twin, Scotch, is now the one on the Supe's List."That's how you can tell us apart," Scotch, born Scott McKinney, says. Supe's List is Navy slang for the Superintendent's List, meaning a midshipman has at least a 3.4 grade point average (out of 4.0) and a sea of A's in military performance, conduct and physical education.
TRAVEL
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2013
Southern Living magazine named Fells Point 's Birds of a Feather one of the top three whiskey bars in the South today. The magazine's description of the bar keeps it appropriately simple: "Hole-in-the-wall Scotch bar with 120 single malts. " A Lagavulin, neat ($15), is recommended by the publication. Alicia Horn and her late husband John opened the bar at 1712 Aliceanna St. roughly 30 years ago. They once served food, but scotch has been the main priority for years.
TRAVEL
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2013
Southern Living magazine named Fells Point 's Birds of a Feather one of the top three whiskey bars in the South today. The magazine's description of the bar keeps it appropriately simple: "Hole-in-the-wall Scotch bar with 120 single malts. " A Lagavulin, neat ($15), is recommended by the publication. Alicia Horn and her late husband John opened the bar at 1712 Aliceanna St. roughly 30 years ago. They once served food, but scotch has been the main priority for years.
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 17, 2004
On a day when everybody can be Irish, it's worth noting that whiskey, too, has roots in the Emerald Isle. The Irish may have been the first to distill spirits. Recounting the history of distillation in his Encyclopedia of Wine and Spirits, Alexis Lichine notes that aqua vitae, the early name for spirits, "was on sale in Italy in the Middle Ages; at about the same time, or a little earlier, it appeared in Ireland ... distilled from a barley beer." The maker of the oldest continuously produced brand of Irish whiskey, Old Bushmills, was granted a license by King James I in 1608, and Irish distilleries proliferated and thrived for 300 years.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper | April 23, 2000
I am fond of Sunday night supper. It is a comfort meal, the last blast of weekend pleasure before the weekday grind of work and school begins. The trick is to make the meal soothing for the cook. This is especially important when, as often happens during warm weather months, I fire up the backyard grill, and am nominally in charge of getting the Sunday night supper on the table. Last Sunday, for instance, grilled hamburgers were the entree. I wanted to jazz up the meal a bit and briefly looked at a recipe that called for tossing tarragon, parsley, shallots and Scotch -- yes, Scotch -- in the burgers.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | December 30, 1990
Like many people, at the end of the year I try to get a new perspective on what is in front of me. I try to get to the bottom of things.In other words, at the end of the year, I clean my desk.It is not so much a cleaning as it is a consolidation. Instead of many stacks of paper I now have one or two stacks.One stack contains papers with information on projects that I am really going to accomplish next year. Like not lose my weekly appointment calendar.I lost the one for 1990 about a month ago. Somehow my life went on. But I am going to get another one for the New Year.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2014
So much of my time is taken up with doctoring sick prose, and complaining here about suspect advice on grammar and usage, that I thought it might be salutary to take a look, for once, at some good prose.  Here is the opening paragraph from "Josie's Well," an article by John McPhee on Scotch whisky first published in Holiday  in 1970 and reprinted in his collection Pieces of the Frame. The text The Laphroaig distillery is on the southern shore of Islay, one of the isles of Argyll, in the Inner Hebrides.
NEWS
By Donald Vitek | September 23, 1990
One of greatest features about bowling is that anyone can do it and have fun.A cranker's huge hook, a youngster's back-up ball, the senior citizen's slow roller that curves gently into the pocket -- they're all the same when the 10 pins get knocked down.Cindy and Mark Rine, like most working couples who bowl, do it purely for fun.The Rines live in Ellicott City and bowl at Brunswick Normandy Lanes in the Sunday Afternoon mixers.Mark Rine is employed by the Digital Corp.; Cindy Rine works for Chevy Chase Federal Savings.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2012
Marion Snyder Goldstein, a nurse who supervised operating rooms for decades at the now-closed Children's Hospital on Greenspring Avenue, died Tuesday at Stella Maris assisted living in Timonium. The longtime Baldwin resident was 92. The family was not provided a cause of death, though Mrs. Goldstein's physical and mental health had been in decline for several years, said daughter Deborah Drimer of Lutherville. Marion Snyder was born in Scranton, Pa., where she was raised and lived across the street from the Nay Aug Park zoo. She regularly visited Tilly the elephant there, often taking a banana as a snack for the pachyderm.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2011
Fewer Kardashians than ever are now expected at the Baltimore Grand Prix. Organizers have scotched the Harbor Club, the "exclusive access" VIP area that was to be located on the Inner Harbor's West Shore Park. Pete Collier, the event's chief operating officer, is shouldering the blame for not bringing off the Harbor Club, which the event's promotional materials described as "Baltimore's answer to the famous European Grand Prix's, with their scenic water views, trackside marina, and jet setting crowds.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | March 19, 2008
Loretta M. Simpson, a homemaker and longtime Armagh Village resident, died of heart failure Saturday at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. She was 100. Loretta Mansfield was born and raised in Washington. She was a 1926 graduate of the Academy of the Holy Cross, which was then located on Upton Street N.W. in Washington. Until the birth of her son in 1944, she was an office worker for the federal government. In 1942, she married Arthur L. Simpson, and the couple settled into Armagh Village in 1953.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | October 4, 2007
So often, scotch bars are stuffy places where crusty old fat cats sip $40 shots and suck on big cigars. Yuck. That's what sets Birds of a Feather apart: It's a clean, smoke-free neighborhood scotch bar in Fells Point. And compared to other Baltimore watering holes, you rarely see the level of love and attention owner and sole bartender Alicia Horn puts into the place. Horn and her late husband, John, opened Birds of a Feather about 25 years ago as a restaurant and bar. They later scaled back from a full menu to light fare.
BUSINESS
By STACEY HIRSH and STACEY HIRSH,SUN REPORTER | April 13, 2006
Martin Roesch's technology company was started in 2001 the same way many others begin - from his living room. During its first year, Roesch's network security firm Sourcefire Inc. was running shipping and receiving from the foyer and conducting data operations from what is now the in-law suite at his Eldersburg home. "It was definitely a startup," recalled Roesch, 36, who is now the company's chief technology officer. Five years later, Sourcefire has grown to 150 employees with offices around the world, including two at its Columbia headquarters.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Christopher Corbett and Christopher Corbett,Special to the Sun | February 27, 2005
Winslow In Love By Kevin Canty. Nan A. Talese / Doubleday. 292 pages. $23.95. The drunken poet in sad decline is a stock figure in fiction (usually cruelly comic) and nowhere more so than in the little novel of academic life. We have been here before. But Kevin Canty's new novel, Winslow In Love, is not a predictable tale of goatish pedagogues or schoolmaster's high jinx. And it is never funny. From the first page of this grim story -- think Raymond Carver -- a terrible sense of dread looms, from the rainy streets of the Pacific Northwest and the seedy bar in which the book opens to the remote college in Montana where Richard Winslow, an alcoholic poet desperate for dollars, washes ashore for a semester to teach Rilke to the impressionable and go fly-fishing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Christopher Corbett and Christopher Corbett,Special to the Sun | February 27, 2005
Winslow In Love By Kevin Canty. Nan A. Talese / Doubleday. 292 pages. $23.95. The drunken poet in sad decline is a stock figure in fiction (usually cruelly comic) and nowhere more so than in the little novel of academic life. We have been here before. But Kevin Canty's new novel, Winslow In Love, is not a predictable tale of goatish pedagogues or schoolmaster's high jinx. And it is never funny. From the first page of this grim story -- think Raymond Carver -- a terrible sense of dread looms, from the rainy streets of the Pacific Northwest and the seedy bar in which the book opens to the remote college in Montana where Richard Winslow, an alcoholic poet desperate for dollars, washes ashore for a semester to teach Rilke to the impressionable and go fly-fishing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2011
Fewer Kardashians than ever are now expected at the Baltimore Grand Prix. Organizers have scotched the Harbor Club, the "exclusive access" VIP area that was to be located on the Inner Harbor's West Shore Park. Pete Collier, the event's chief operating officer, is shouldering the blame for not bringing off the Harbor Club, which the event's promotional materials described as "Baltimore's answer to the famous European Grand Prix's, with their scenic water views, trackside marina, and jet setting crowds.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | November 22, 2004
WHEN I think of scotch drinkers, I think of florid-faced men in pinstriped suits sunk into leather chairs at some fancy club, their beefy hands wrapped around a glass of 25-year-old Ballantine as they argue whether Ike knows what he's doing with the Russkies. I think of hat-check girls and Guy Lombardo and boozy nights at the Copa, a haze of cigarette smoke clinging to the room like a fog bank. Scotch, to me, is a drink from the past. This is no knock on scotch-drinkers, but in my circle of friends, I know exactly one person who drinks the stuff.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | May 26, 2004
WINDING DOWN the day with a wee dram of well-made whiskey is an appealing notion. Yet I surprised myself recently by driving some 150 miles, racing daylight and getting temporarily lost in New Jersey, to sample the scotch being poured at an Atlantic City hotel. This, however, was not ordinary hooch. It was single-malt Scotch whisky from the House of Macallan, one of Scotland's distinguished distillers. Merely mentioning the name causes the taste buds of scotch aficionados to salivate and their wallets to open.
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