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NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | June 19, 2003
BOSTON - And now for some news from the stalled economy: Scorn is trending a wee bit up. Not that long ago, scorn and its handmaidens - disdain and neglect - were pretty much reserved for the welfare poor. The working poor, by comparison, were publicly praised as Americans who "played by the rules." They were folks who warranted a helping hand. But now the rules have officially changed. The line between the deserving and the undeserving poor has moved up a couple of notches on the socioeconomic scale.
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NEWS
December 18, 2012
As the nation continues this week to deal with the grief and heartache left behind by the murder of 26 children and adults at Sandy Hook Elementary School last Friday, let there also be a moment set aside for exultation. Let a banner be raised for the heroes of Newtown, Conn.: the educators who sprang into action to protect the young students in their charge. We don't know how many lives were saved by the alert and brave actions of the faculty and staff at Sandy Hook, but we suspect they were many.
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NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | June 21, 1991
&TC MOSCOW -- President Mikhail S. Gorbachev denounced hard-line opponents of economic reform yesterday and signaled that he will resist conservative pressure and insist on radical moves toward a market economy.The remarks were the strongest blast against reactionary Communists heard in many months from Mr. Gorbachev, who for the past year has reserved nearly all of his public scorn for democratic radicals.The statement contributed to the growing perception here that he is staking his fortunes on radical republican leaders, newly elected Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin chief among them.
NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | July 10, 2012
Supposedly, an estimated 10 percent of Americans can trace their ancestry back to the Mayflower. Not surprisingly, former President George W. Bush - son of a president, grandson of a U.S. senator, first offspring produced by the marriage of the blueblooded Bush and Walker families - is a Mayflower descendant. President Barack Obama's roots go almost that deep: He is a descendant of Thomas Blossom, who arrived in Plymouth Colony less than a decade after the Mayflower landed. America's two most recent presidents are distant cousins.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2003
William Donald Schaefer says he always returns calls. That's why the 81-year-old state comptroller tracked down the home number for Ron Collins, a labor organizer from Baltimore, and left an answering-machine message. But Collins said Schaefer's recording amounted to a threat. That's why he called Baltimore police this week, alleging he was being harassed. And so unfolds another chapter -- albeit a thin one -- in the 40-year career of one of Maryland's most colorful politicians. The saga began more than a week ago when Collins, 40, read a Schaefer quotation in a newspaper about how he hated former Gov. Parris N. Glendening.
SPORTS
By EDWARD LEE and EDWARD LEE,SUN REPORTER | February 12, 2006
College Park -- Dozens of orange-clad fans of the Tennessee women's basketball team turned red with rage two months ago, and the object of their scorn was Sa'de Wiley-Gatewood. Backers of the-then-No. 1 Lady Vols took to the Internet after the university announced in December that Wiley-Gatewood, a sophomore point guard, was transferring to another school. Accusations of selfishness and an inability to be a team player were posted faster than one of her crossover dribbles. No. 6 Maryland@No.
NEWS
By William James Price | August 24, 1995
I look with ancient eyes upon the city Whose tireless traffic ever round me rolls, I feel its pain, its passion and its pity As well as men possessed with mortal souls. My hands the work of many long completed: I helped replace the saber and the sword, Who now with calculating scorn am greeted -- The wealthy giving never thought or word. The worldly-wise go by with hearts unheeding; And yet my very silence calls aloud. Will only dreamers lend the help I'm needing To save me from the coffin and the shroud?
NEWS
May 14, 2003
Schaefer isn't the man guilty of harassment Shame on Ron Collins for telling the media and the Police Department that state Comptroller William Donald Schaefer was harassing him. He should have better things to do than to try to create news where there is none ("Call draws Schaefer's scorn - again," May 10). And if you want to talk about inappropriate, just how inappropriate is it to call an elected official's office and say that he needs to retire? The state comptroller is 81 years old, and I find it hard to believe Mr. Collins felt threatened by him in any way. It is such a waste of taxpayers' dollars to tie up police officers' time with such nonsense.
NEWS
By Aaron Epstein and Ellen Warren and Aaron Epstein and Ellen Warren,Knight-Ridder News Service | October 11, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The White House and congressional supporters of Judge Clarence Thomas reacted last night with unshaken confidence -- and even scorn -- to the disclosure that a second woman will testify against the Supreme Court nominee.White House spokesman Marlin Fitzwater said that the nomination would survive despite allegations by Angela D. Wright, a North Carolina newspaper editor and a former aide to Judge Thomas, that Judge Thomas made "unwelcome and inappropriate" sexual remarks to her.Ms.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | September 22, 1990
MOSCOW -- Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, frustrated by the indecision of parliament over alternative economic plans, asked yesterday for emergency powers to cope with growing political and economic chaos.Pounding on a wooden lectern, Mr. Gorbachev warned of a spreading "paralysis of power," with old Communist hierarchies no longer functioning and newly elected bodies failing to act decisively. He said that, where necessary, he would consider dissolving local elected councils and imposing direct presidential rule.
NEWS
January 17, 2012
You will excuse me for not getting exercised over the decision by Waterstone's the British bookseller, to drop the apostrophe from its name.* The Apostrophe Protection Society appears to have its knickers in a twist, as it has in the past over Harrods. Not me. The society has its work cut out for it. The semicolon has its defenders, and needs them, because that punctuation mark appears to inspire dislike or unease. The lowly comma - It's a pause mark! It's a syntax mark! It's both!
FEATURES
By Matthew Hay Brown | matthew.brown@baltsun.com | November 13, 2009
As doomsday scenarios go, it's got everything you could ask for: ancient prophecies, a rogue planet, the reversal of Earth's magnetic poles - and a worldwide conspiracy to conceal the truth. John Kehne can't say how it all adds up. But come Dec. 21, 2012, he's expecting something big. "We're seeing now, and will continue to see, more and more disasters, both man-made and natural," says the Maryland native, whose "official" Web site on the subject features a clock counting down to the end of the world as we know it. "On that day, we will reach a pretty major disaster," Kehne says.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | September 12, 2008
In Diane English's bogus new version of The Women, starring Meg Ryan as the virtuous housewife and Eva Mendes as the vamp who steals her husband away, there's no longer a brilliant set piece on a dude ranch, and no one comes out smelling like a cactus rose. In a way, The First Wives Club had a better idea of how to remake The Women: Play up the slapstick and let three inspired clowns, Goldie Hawn, Diane Keaton and Bette Midler, pratfall their way to glory. You can gauge the misplaced priorities of The Women by how it cuts Midler down to a couple of uninspired scenes.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN REPORTER | May 23, 2008
The pressure on the Duke men's lacrosse team keeps growing. The Blue Devils are the top seed in the NCAA tournament and face No. 5 seed and defending national champion Johns Hopkins in the final four tomorrow in Foxborough, Mass. In addition, Duke was No. 1 most of the season and lost just one game, more than two months ago. Finally, there's the NCAA's controversial decision last May to grant an extra year of eligibility to 33 team members after much of their 2006 season was canceled in the wake of rape allegations against three players - charges that were eventually dismissed.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun reporter | October 14, 2007
A young woman waits demurely in a stark room. Before her on a table sit scissors and one half of a pair of Crocs. For the next two minutes and 35 seconds, as a jaunty Cole Porter score plays, she takes scissors to shoe, shredding the rubbery yellow thing into sad little slivers. The slivers she pulverizes in a blender. A smile never leaves her face. The dismemberment, enjoyed by more then 60,000 people on YouTube, comes compliments of the folks behind Ihatecrocs.com, an Internet site dedicated to the elimination of Crocs and those who think that their excuses for wearing them are viable.
NEWS
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun reporter | October 7, 2007
A pan flute's mellow notes bring texture to soft and sharp percussive pops of sound: the crisp snap of a snare drum, the deadening punch of a bass drum and the scratching on a turntable. THUMP bump bump bump SNAP bump bump bump. For a few seconds, the disparate sounds fuse together and become song. Yet there are no drums, no turntable - just one musician. A slight man with short hair and a stubbly beard, Dominic Earle Shodekeh Bouma sits alone, lowering his pensive, deep-set eyes as he blows into the pan flute.
NEWS
January 17, 2012
You will excuse me for not getting exercised over the decision by Waterstone's the British bookseller, to drop the apostrophe from its name.* The Apostrophe Protection Society appears to have its knickers in a twist, as it has in the past over Harrods. Not me. The society has its work cut out for it. The semicolon has its defenders, and needs them, because that punctuation mark appears to inspire dislike or unease. The lowly comma - It's a pause mark! It's a syntax mark! It's both!
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,Sun reporter | May 12, 2007
The doggedly old-fashioned St. John's College in Annapolis considers its students scholars in the mold of ancients, not modern consumers of an educational pedigree. So it's not surprising that the campus with the "Great Books" curriculum is among a dozen colleges advocating a boycott of a U.S. News & World Report survey that asks schools to rate their peers. The survey factors heavily into the magazine's influential college rankings. "I don't think prestige has anything to do with the education students are getting," said St. John's President Christopher Nelson.
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