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By J. L. Conklin | November 4, 1991
In the intimate upstairs gallery at the Maryland Art Place, 10 young women known as the Scope Dancers gave a full-out performance of choreography by Edna D. Simmons-Bennett Saturday night as part of a series of performances hosted by New Breezes Inc.New Breezes promotes the artistic endeavors of local minority artists. Its director, Alma Roberts, has put together various performances of local poets, writers, musicians, sculptors, painters and dancers. The one-time performance by dancers affiliated with Coppin State University, while difficult at times to see (a gallery is not a stage)
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NEWS
Dan Rodricks | August 26, 2014
Through stunning advances in technology, guns are becoming more accurate and deadlier. They are also becoming safer. Crazy as it might seem, gun-rights activists are excited about the former, but opposed to the latter. The gun-obsessed might admire computerized, laser-based rifle scopes that turn amateurs into master snipers at 1,200 yards, but offer them "smart gun" technology that limits a firearm's use to its rightful owner and they get surly. Apparently, gun lovers think such a safety feature might become mandatory and, as we all know, anything mandatory constitutes a threat to their absolute Second Amendment rights to bear whatever guns they wish, public safety be damned.
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SPORTS
By LONNY WEAVER | July 9, 1995
Last weekend I walked Hampstead's Rich Gonsman through the steps involved in mounting a rifle scope on his new .22 magnum Marlin bolt-action rifle and then adjusting the scope to put a bullet were he wanted it to land on a target.Gonsman's new rifle, like most .22 rifles, features grooves in the top of the receiver that accept special tip-off scope mounts. Tip-off mounts are designed to be used with rifles having little or no recoil and are relatively inexpensive.Most tip-off mounts simply slide onto the groove milled into the top of the receiver and are tightened in place by a large horizontally located screw.
BUSINESS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2014
— An effort to lure the FBI to Maryland could have a profound payoff for the state's economy, but the benefits could take years to materialize and the eventual impact would hinge on the way local officials handle the project, several of the state's top economists say. Maryland's congressional delegation has been pressing for months to make Prince George's County the new home of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, which is currently headquartered in...
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | May 27, 2002
Michael Cofnavage took care of his ailing 74-year-old mother in the beige, vinyl-sided house in Aberdeen where he grew up. Working as a security guard, he earned enough money to shop for them both, always remembering to buy food for her crested yellow parrot, Oscar. But last fall, Evelyn Austin began to worry about her 56-year- old son. He lost more than 20 pounds and was so lethargic he rarely pried himself off the couch. She urged him to see a doctor, and on Oct. 16, he learned he had AIDS, probably from unprotected sex, according to his medical records.
BUSINESS
By Natasha Lesser and Natasha Lesser,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 6, 2005
When Chad Wright first saw the three-story, 19th-century rowhouse on Madison Avenue in Reservoir Hill, he fell in love with it, even though it was infested with termites and had a tree growing through the back wall. The house had been vacant for years, but that didn't dissuade him. "I saw the potential," said Wright, 26, who bought the rowhouse for $25,000. His settlement was in April 2004, and he began work on the house the next weekend. Almost a year and $200,000 later, he is in the final stages of the rehabilitation, which he has done mostly in his spare time while he worked by day designing sprinkler systems for Livingston Fire Protection.
NEWS
By Laura Loh and Laura Loh,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2004
The Anne Arundel County school board discussed yesterday limiting or abandoning a potentially costly third-party audit of the school system, a proposal that had been made to quell public perception that top administrators are overpaid. The board also postponed until Wednesday a vote on Superintendent Eric J. Smith's recommended $672 million operating budget for the next fiscal year after members said they needed more time to review the school system's finances. The performance audit was proposed earlier this month by board member Konrad M. Wayson, who said he wanted to be able to answer accusations that the school system's administration is top-heavy.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | August 26, 2014
Through stunning advances in technology, guns are becoming more accurate and deadlier. They are also becoming safer. Crazy as it might seem, gun-rights activists are excited about the former, but opposed to the latter. The gun-obsessed might admire computerized, laser-based rifle scopes that turn amateurs into master snipers at 1,200 yards, but offer them "smart gun" technology that limits a firearm's use to its rightful owner and they get surly. Apparently, gun lovers think such a safety feature might become mandatory and, as we all know, anything mandatory constitutes a threat to their absolute Second Amendment rights to bear whatever guns they wish, public safety be damned.
NEWS
March 14, 1996
A diagram of the Baltimore Beltway widening in yesterday's editions of The Sun inaccurately showed the scope of the highway project. The Beltway will be expanded to eight lanes between Reisterstown Road and Interstate 83 South.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 3/14/96
NEWS
By ERIC SIEGEL | October 19, 2006
Ayear and a half after Mayor Martin O'Malley announced his ambitious plan to take control of 5,000 abandoned properties, Baltimore began a smaller, more focused program to sell vacant city-owned properties through private real estate brokers. Project SCOPE (for Selling City-Owned Properties Efficiently) has just completed its third year -- and a new report gives mixed marks to selling individual properties in marginal or improving neighborhoods rather than large groupings of buildings in more distressed communities.
NEWS
February 18, 2014
At first, leaders of the General Assembly were promising as many hearings as it would take to get to the bottom of the failure of Maryland's health care exchange website. Then they decided to put off questions about what went wrong until an audit that wouldn't be completed until after this summer's gubernatorial primary, and instead to task a special committee with monitoring progress going forward. Now they're shifting gears again. Two committee chairmen are asking legislative auditors to review documents detailing the lead-up to the website's botched October launch and to report back before the General Assembly adjourns in April.
NEWS
By Steve Jones, For The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2014
Stephanie Todd, 8, smiled broadly as she talked about the pink telescope that sits in her home. But she's even more excited about the opportunity to look through a telescope that has some history. "The first thing I'm going to look for is [the constellation] Orion," she said, "which is the kind of star that I see outside, and is always so noticeable. " If everything goes as planned for the Howard Astronomical League, Stephanie will be gazing at Orion through the Paul Watson telescope - a device built by a renowned Johns Hopkins University professor that will be the main attraction at Howard County's new observatory.
NEWS
December 11, 2013
At first glance, it would be tempting to condemn the bipartisan budget agreement announced late Tuesday by Rep. Paul Ryan and Sen. Patty Murray, if only because it asks further sacrifice of the unemployed and of federal workers . Those are hardly the two groups on whose backs the rollback of certain untenable sequestration cuts should be made. Extending unemployment benefits at a time of high unemployment used to be a given in this country no matter one's political leanings. But now it appears that there's no touching the hearts of Congressional Scrooges this year.
NEWS
By Tim Pula and By Tim Pula | July 1, 2013
Harbor Point, 27 acres of mostly vacant land on the Inner Harbor, is poised for one of the most significant developments in Baltimore's history. After losing 300,000 residents and many businesses during the past 40 years, Baltimore needs to grow its corporate and middle class populations to become more financially stable. Harbor Point alone won't do that, but it can move Baltimore in that direction. Debate has surrounded Harbor Point's proposed use of tax increment financing (TIF)
TRAVEL
By Brooks Welsh, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2012
Now what would vacation be without a few trinkets to remember the trip? There is a multitude of gimmicky t-shirts, cups and other pieces of beach memorabilia, but very few of the gimmicky trinkets allow for a personal touch. If you want that, grabbing telescope photos or "scopes" with your friends and family is the way to go. I know what you might be thinking. "Those things? The ones with the annoying people that run up to you on the beach and try to sell you pictures?" Yes, you might be right to a point, but stay with me. You are on vacation.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | May 16, 2012
I want to thank Ms. Nina Platt of Homeland for providing me with a copy of her outrageous water bill - and her neighbor's - because, until this happened, I was feeling left out of the Great Baltimore Water Bill Commiseration. It seems like everybody in the city but me has a goofy and outrageous water bill to brag and gripe about. My bill looks normal, boring and puny compared to what I see here: $813.75 due by May 29 for Ms. Platt, who lives alone, and $1,219.06 for the family of four next door.
NEWS
October 21, 1994
A Brooklyn Park man told Northern District police officers that a burglar broke into his apartment Tuesday and stole four handguns and a sawed-off shotgun, authorities said.Francis Joseph Bobbie, 44, told police the theft occurrebetween 8 a.m. and 5:15 p.m. He arrived home to find that someone had kicked in the rear basement door of the building he lives in, went to his first-floor apartment and pried open the deadbolt lock on his door, police said.The thief ransacked Mr. Bobbie's bedroom and stole two Smith and Wesson .44-caliber Magnum pistols, a Red Hawk .44-caliber Magnum pistol with a scope, a Smith and Wesson .357 with a scope and a 12-gauge, single-shot, sawed-off shotgun.
SPORTS
By Paul White and Paul White,Contributing Writer | March 6, 1993
NORFOLK, Va. -- Deon Murray's 12-footer at the buzzer lifted No. 3 seed South Carolina State to an improbable 59-57 win over No. 6 seed Maryland-Eastern Shore last night in the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference tournament at The Scope.The Bulldogs (16-12) trailed by 10 with 4:21 to play, but held the Hawks (11-16) scoreless the rest of the way.
NEWS
July 20, 2011
I was deeply disappointed to read of the Department of the Interior's decision to vastly reduce the area for prospective wind power projects off Maryland's coasts ("U.S. OKs wind power area off Md., cuts possible size by more than half," July 12). If we harness the full potential of offshore wind power, it could provide two-thirds of our state's electricity needs, according to a 2010 study by the Abell Foundation. Although the decision will allow enough space for the moderately-sized wind project that Gov. Martin O'Malley is pushing, our need for clean, renewable energy in Maryland will require us to go beyond Mr. O'Malley's initial wind project and cultivate larger projects.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2011
Law enforcement authorities raided the Pikesville home and downtown Baltimore office of veteran defense attorney Stanley H. Needleman Thursday morning. The scope of the investigation was not immediately clear. At his law office in the 1000 block of N. Calvert St., the front door was ajar with a handwritten "Closed Today" sign taped to it. Through the front window, men appeared to be looking through papers, and three agents were lingering outside around back of the office. A spokesman for the Drug Enforcement Administration initially denied that agents were involved, then said the agency would have no comment.
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