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By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 4, 1997
Our doctor just diagnosed my 13-year-old daughter with scoliosis. He told us she might need to wear a brace to correct it. My mother says back exercises would work just as well for her poor posture. Would there be any harm to trying the exercises for a year?In answering your question, it is important to distinguish between scoliosis and "poor posture." The latter may certainly be amenable to back exercises whereas scoliosis most certainly will not. Some young people will slouch through habit or because they have weak back or abdominal muscles.
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By Paul Tierney, The Baltimore Sun and By Paul Tierney, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2014
Devan Hibbs' lacrosse career was supposed to be over. As she lay motionless in a hospital bed, just hours after two foot-long rods and 12 screws were inserted into her back to prevent scoliosis from damaging her vital organs, Hibbs' body was swollen beyond recognition. "It looked like she had just been in a terrible car accident," said Dave Hibbs, Devan's father. "It was that serious. I never imagined she'd be able to play again. We just hoped she'd be able to recover and live a normal life.
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SPORTS
By Paul Tierney, The Baltimore Sun and By Paul Tierney, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2014
Devan Hibbs' lacrosse career was supposed to be over. As she lay motionless in a hospital bed, just hours after two foot-long rods and 12 screws were inserted into her back to prevent scoliosis from damaging her vital organs, Hibbs' body was swollen beyond recognition. "It looked like she had just been in a terrible car accident," said Dave Hibbs, Devan's father. "It was that serious. I never imagined she'd be able to play again. We just hoped she'd be able to recover and live a normal life.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | July 23, 2011
Every morning, around 5 a.m., before the sunlight splashes on the beige bedroom walls of the weathered farmhouse in Upperco, Charlene Miller stirs, yawns - and prays. Thank you, Lord, for helping me come through the night . She doesn't get up. Several hours later, she nudges her husband of 49 years. Fred Miller wakens grumbling, as usual. But the old Baltimore Colt lineman rises, circles the bed and kisses her gently on the cheek. Charlene stays put. Fred lumbers downstairs, rustles up breakfast and starts his chores around the 46-acre farm.
NEWS
June 8, 2009
Scoliosis, an abnormal curvature of the spine, affects roughly 2 percent of the population, according to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. For National Scoliosis Awareness Month, Dr. Charles Edwards II of the Maryland Spine Center at Mercy Medical Center offers five things you should know about the disease. * Abnormal curvature of the spine is termed scoliosis. It typically increases in size during the years of most rapid growth. Children with scoliosis are evaluated with spine X-rays every six to 12 months.
NEWS
By Solana Pyne and Solana Pyne,Special to the Sun | September 9, 2001
Like many mothers, Nancy Weiss is full of praise for her 16-year-old daughter, Kimberly. The Port Washington, N.Y., mother commends Kimberly's writing ability and her quick wit, but she really raves about Kimberly's long, flat back. Thirty-nine years ago, at Kimberly's age, Nancy spent a year in bed recovering from surgery with a cast that stretched from chest to hips. Nancy had scoliosis, a condition in which the spine curves sideways and twists, rotating the rib cage so that the flat part, which normally makes up the back, shifts to the side and a curved side shifts toward the back, creating a hump in more severe cases.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | July 23, 2011
Every morning, around 5 a.m., before the sunlight splashes on the beige bedroom walls of the weathered farmhouse in Upperco, Charlene Miller stirs, yawns - and prays. Thank you, Lord, for helping me come through the night . She doesn't get up. Several hours later, she nudges her husband of 49 years. Fred Miller wakens grumbling, as usual. But the old Baltimore Colt lineman rises, circles the bed and kisses her gently on the cheek. Charlene stays put. Fred lumbers downstairs, rustles up breakfast and starts his chores around the 46-acre farm.
NEWS
October 9, 2004
Pamela A. Garcia, a homemaker and former administrative assistant, died of undetermined causes Monday at her Towson home. She was 57. She was born Pamela Mills in Baltimore and raised in Hamilton. She was a 1965 graduate of Parkville High School and attended Essex Community College. Mrs. Garcia, who had suffered from scoliosis as a teenager, worked briefly as an administrative assistant before retiring on a medical disability. She was a cat fancier and was especially fond of Siamese cats.
NEWS
July 21, 1991
The Harford County Commission for Women will sponsor "Hand-in-Hand Day" Saturday at Harford Mall in Bel Air from 10 a.m. until about 9:30p.m. so county residents can get acquainted with the many support groups available.Whether it's a parent trying to cope with an emptynest or an incest victim struggling to survive, there's a support group available to help with sharing and subsequent growth and healing,county government spokeswoman Sue Collins says.Representatives from nearly 30 support groups will participate inthe daylong event and will provide brochures about their services.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | May 6, 1992
Working for free, surgeons at Johns Hopkins Hospital have removed a fast-growing spinal tumor that had paralyzed and threatened to kill a 12-year-old schoolgirl from Guyana, South America.The child, Ulanda McGarrell, is walking again just two months after her two operations, and she continues to regain her strength with intensive rehabilitative therapy at the Mount Washington Pediatric Hospital in Baltimore."May God bless everybody," said her grateful grandmother, whose name is Princess Rodney.
NEWS
June 8, 2009
Scoliosis, an abnormal curvature of the spine, affects roughly 2 percent of the population, according to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. For National Scoliosis Awareness Month, Dr. Charles Edwards II of the Maryland Spine Center at Mercy Medical Center offers five things you should know about the disease. * Abnormal curvature of the spine is termed scoliosis. It typically increases in size during the years of most rapid growth. Children with scoliosis are evaluated with spine X-rays every six to 12 months.
NEWS
By Solana Pyne and Solana Pyne,Special to the Sun | September 9, 2001
Like many mothers, Nancy Weiss is full of praise for her 16-year-old daughter, Kimberly. The Port Washington, N.Y., mother commends Kimberly's writing ability and her quick wit, but she really raves about Kimberly's long, flat back. Thirty-nine years ago, at Kimberly's age, Nancy spent a year in bed recovering from surgery with a cast that stretched from chest to hips. Nancy had scoliosis, a condition in which the spine curves sideways and twists, rotating the rib cage so that the flat part, which normally makes up the back, shifts to the side and a curved side shifts toward the back, creating a hump in more severe cases.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 4, 1997
Our doctor just diagnosed my 13-year-old daughter with scoliosis. He told us she might need to wear a brace to correct it. My mother says back exercises would work just as well for her poor posture. Would there be any harm to trying the exercises for a year?In answering your question, it is important to distinguish between scoliosis and "poor posture." The latter may certainly be amenable to back exercises whereas scoliosis most certainly will not. Some young people will slouch through habit or because they have weak back or abdominal muscles.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 30, 2002
IF YOU'VE watched children walking to school, you've seen that some of them look more like Himalayan Sherpas bearing supplies to classes on Mount Everest than children of middle-class families living in a modern society. Carrying overloaded backpacks is not the exception today, but the rule. What students put into their backpacks and how they carry them have produced some startling statistics. Arnold chiropractor Diane Kelly does the math: If your child carries a backpack that weighs 12 pounds and lifts that weight 10 times a day, the child will lift 120 pounds a day, or 21,600 pounds in one 180-day school year.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | October 30, 2009
Alan M. Levine, director of the Alvin & Lois Lapidus Cancer Institute for Sinai Hospital and Northwest Hospital Center and an internationally known orthopedic oncologist, died Sunday . The Pikesville resident was 61. Dr. Levine was exercising at the LifeBridge Health and Fitness Center in Pikesville on Sunday morning when he was stricken with a heart attack.. "Alan's death is a shock and a huge loss. He was an extraordinary figure with a bigger-than-life personality. He had an enormous talent for doing a lot of things well," said Warren A. Green, president and chief executive officer of LifeBridge Health, which owns and operates Sinai Hospital and Northwest Hospital Center.
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