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By Lane Page | January 30, 2012
The opening scene went something like this: Setting: Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab building 17 cafeteria -- Fall 2009 Rocket Scientist #1: I do community theater. Rocket Scientist #2: I almost minored in theater in college. Rocket Scientist #1: Really? We should start a drama club here. Rocket Scientist #2: I'm in. Rocket Scientist #1: OK, good. For Big Science types at APL, tilting too far to their logical, self-controlled left brains could be hazardous. But that's less of an issue since the curtain was raised on the APL Drama Club by mission designer Chris Dong and fellow space department member Dawn Moessner, a mission design analyst.
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By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
As a tropical cyclone churned the Atlantic Ocean this month, a drone watched from above, dropping a paper-towel-roll-sized set of sensors attached to a parachute through the clouds on a 20-minute, 10-mile journey. The instruments revealed dry air low in the storm's center - something scientists from the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center suspect was the nascent eye of Hurricane Edouard. The storm went on to become the Atlantic's first to reach winds of more than 110 mph since Sandy in 2012, though it never threatened the United States.
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By Scott Dance | April 2, 2012
A monthly chance to learn from scientists who study the heavens at the Space Telescope Science Institute takes place tomorrow. The institute, on the campus of Johns Hopkins University at 3700 San Martin Drive, is hosting its regular lecture event at 8 p.m. Scientist Marcel Haas will give a lecture titled “ Growing Galaxies in Supercomputers .” If you can't make it, the Bloomberg telescope is also open to the public Friday evenings,...
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By Jacques Kelly and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
Philip Filner, a retired molecular biologist and community activist who helped preserve a wooded and wetland tract in Owings Mills, died of pancreatic cancer Sept. 6 at his Lutherville home. He was 75. Born in Philadelphia, he was the son of Samuel Filner, an artist and illustrator, and Lily Cohen Filner, a homemaker. He was raised in Queens, N.Y., and was a 1956 graduate of Stuyvesant High School. As a young man, he delivered meats for a kosher butcher and worked as a city parks recreation worker and a darkroom assistant for a photographer.
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By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2012
Half a century ago, a nearby cluster of stars appeared to astronomers as a single glowing ball of gas. As recently as 15 years ago, scientists realized it was in fact a cluster of stars but were convinced they all must have formed at the same time and with the same composition. Now astronomers at Baltimore's Space Telescope Science Institute have found evidence that one cluster may actually be two, one a million years older than the other, in the process of merging. The clusters are 170,000 light years from Earth in an area known as the Tarantula Nebula.
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By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
Johns Hopkins University scientists are building a telescope meant to look at space in a way no one has before, hoping to probe the blackness between planets, stars and galaxies, into deep time and the mystery of how it all began. For decades, scientists have used telescopes to plumb the origins of the universe, but have not applied the scale or precision of the project that will use a four-telescope array called the Cosmology Large-Angular Scale Surveyor, or CLASS, being built now at the university's Bloomberg Center for Physics and Astronomy.
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By Frank D. Roylance and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 19, 2010
For Charles A. "Karl" Hibbitts and 11 other scientists who hope to fly into space with their experiments someday, the path out of the Earth's atmosphere starts in Philadelphia. Hibbitts, a research scientist at the Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Lab near Laurel, and his fellow space cadets spent two days last week at a private space training center near Philly getting a taste of the rigors and risks of a quick shot, 350,000 feet up to the edge of space and back. One passed out briefly in a hypobaric chamber that simulated aircraft depressurization at 18,000 feet.
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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 7, 1996
Scientists studying a meteorite that fell to Earth from Mars have identified organic compounds and certain minerals that they conclude "are evidence for primitive life on early Mars."The discovery of the first organic molecules ever seen in a Martian rock is being hailed as startling and compelling evidence that at least microbial life existed on Mars long ago, when the planet was warmer and wetter.The molecules found in the rock, which left Mars some 15 million years ago, are being described as the fossil trace of past biological activity.
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By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2014
Professor James Gates delivers his big ideas in analogies and metaphors. Setting lax standards for schoolchildren in science classes is like teaching them to dunk a basketball on a 9-foot-high hoop, when kids the next town over play with one 10 feet high, the state school board member says. Without diversity of thought and perspective among collaborating scientists, you get nothing but classical music, the physicist argues. "When you let different people create different music, you get things like rock 'n' roll, jazz," Gates said.
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By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2013
Florence P. Haseltine knows the power of scientists meeting face to face. The former researcher at the National Institutes of Health notes a list of milestones achieved through networking and collaboration at conferences, such as the deliberations that led to advances that helped slow the spread of HIV. Now Haseltine, former director of the Center for Population Research of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development in Rockville, worries...
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By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2014
NASA's Messenger spacecraft has swung around its namesake planet for three years, beaming observations of Mercury back to Earth, but next March it will smash into the cratered surface it has been studying from afar. The satellite's oblong orbit around the solar system's innermost planet brings it gradually closer and closer as it looks into Mercury's mysterious volcanoes, craters and magnetic field. With dwindling fuel to counteract the dense planet's pull, the scientists managing the mission at Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel can only delay its fall for so long.
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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
Seventy miles off Ocean City , scientists aboard the federal research vessel Henry B. Bigelow are exploring a lush underwater landscape that until recently few would have imagined - colorful corals clinging to the rocky slopes of deep-sea canyons. On this and other research cruises, remotely guided submersible cameras have captured scenes of bubblegum corals, sea whips and more growing in the dark, hundreds to thousands of feet below the Atlantic Ocean's surface. Other smaller patches dot the ocean floor in shallower waters closer to shore.
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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
The dark specks swirling around in big water-filled tanks at the Columbus Center hardly look like fish, much less the kings of the ocean. But from these tiny beginnings, a team of Maryland scientists hopes to unlock the secrets of "farming" Atlantic bluefin tuna, one of the most prized fish on the planet — and one of the most threatened. "For me, it's the Holy Grail," said Yonathan Zohar, a professor of marine biotechnology with the University of Maryland, Baltimore County and head of the aquaculture research center at the Institute for Marine and Environmental Technology at the Inner Harbor.
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Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
Public health officials have just one tactic to battle the unrelenting Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa - quarantine - but as the disease continues to spread, scientists in Maryland are among those close to discovering other weapons. Baltimore companies Profectus BioSciences and Paragon Bioservices, as well as researchers at the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute for Infectious Diseases at Fort Detrick in Frederick and the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, have been part of efforts that have shown a handful of Ebola vaccine candidates are effective in monkeys.
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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2014
"Fish on!" called P.J. Klavon, as he reached for a trap hauled from the placid waters of the Tred Avon River. Inside the black metal cage wriggled a single white perch, a safe distance from a blue crab. The fish weren't exactly jumping last week into the Bay Commitment, a 41-foot research vessel owned by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. After a morning's work collecting more than 100 traps set in the river the day before, the vessel's crew had seen barely a half-bushel of crabs, fewer than two dozen fish and a single eel. Klavon, a lieutenant junior grade in NOAA's uniformed service, didn't have many opportunities to sing out. Fortunately for these trappers, they were fishing for science, not a living.
NEWS
July 8, 2014
In a recent column in The Sun, Peter Morici states that he cannot be a scientist and a liberal at the same time ( "Why I can't be a scientist and a liberal," July 1). He is correct! The fact is, he can never call himself a scientist because economics is not a science, and economists are not scientists. Embracing political positions has nothing to do with science nor does it qualify you as a scientist. David Mauriello, Severna Park - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
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By Frank D. Roylance and Baltimore Sun reporter | October 29, 2009
No one at the Johns Hopkins University's Center for Talented Youth was quite sure what to expect this week when they sat down in a stuffy conference room to host the center's first-ever online kids' "Webinar," on the H1N1 flu pandemic, dubbed Swine Online '09. As it turned out, 55 youngsters logged on from around the country - one as young as 8. And by instant message and telephone, they lobbed 115 questions at two Hopkins epidemiologists....
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By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau | April 24, 1992
WASHINGTON -- A Moscow center offering useful work for former Soviet weapons scientists to prevent them from selling their skills abroad is on the way to starting in June, a key State Department official said yesterday.The $75 million International Science and Technology Center will serve as a sort of "dating service," matching scientists' knowledge with peaceful government and private-sector research projects.A high priority, said Robert Gallucci, the State Department official in charge of the project, will be research into nuclear-plant safety and management of nuclear waste.
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Peter Morici | July 1, 2014
Economists should be bound by facts and reason. I simply can't embrace liberal positions on the minimum wage, climate change and gender discrimination, and call myself a scientist. Let's take them one by one: The minimum wage: The Congressional Budget Office estimates that raising the federal minimum wage to $10.10 an hour, as President Obama proposes, would eliminate 500,000 to 1,000,000 jobs. Businesses will be forced to raise prices, thereby reducing purchases (If beef or a plumber's visit gets too high, folks eat more chicken and fix their own faucets)
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By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
Johns Hopkins University scientists are building a telescope meant to look at space in a way no one has before, hoping to probe the blackness between planets, stars and galaxies, into deep time and the mystery of how it all began. For decades, scientists have used telescopes to plumb the origins of the universe, but have not applied the scale or precision of the project that will use a four-telescope array called the Cosmology Large-Angular Scale Surveyor, or CLASS, being built now at the university's Bloomberg Center for Physics and Astronomy.
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