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By MAUREEN RICE | May 18, 1993
Remember the scientific method? You know: You ask a question, formulate a theory, test it out and, if you are very lucky, the conclusion agrees with the theory and you've proved your point.Fourth- and fifth-graders at Eldersburg Elementary got firsthand experience using this procedure, and, with originality and finesse, the help of teachers and a custodian, created a Science Expo in the school gymnasium last Thursday. It was a learning experience for all who viewed it. It was fun, too.The children rigorously tested -- with questions, hypotheses, listed materials, explanation of procedures, tabulated results, conclusions and follow-up questions -- just about anything they could think of, except anything using animals.
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NEWS
October 31, 2011
The letter from Donald Boesch, "Climate change is real" (Oct 29) seems to typify for me the problem underlying many of these science vs. special interest debates that constantly roil public opinion in the U.S. and prevent the effective implementation of common sense public policy. Climate change and environmental policy is not the only example. Evolution and the origins of the universe are other famous examples which have affected education policy, and we see the first glimmers of new issues arising regarding vaccination and health policy.
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NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,Evening Sun Staff | August 12, 1991
Suddenly, David K. Moreland may discover many new friendships, and a few long-lost relatives.Moreland, a bachelor and an engineer from southern Anne Arundel County, today was identified by the Maryland Lottery Agency as the winner of the state's $20 million Lotto, the largest in the 8-year history of the game.Moreland, 33, went to the administrative offices of the agency at Reisterstown Road Plaza to verify his identity and fill out the voluminous paperwork to which all new millionaires must get accustomed.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2011
Christopher Briggs' science project grew out of his grandparents' love of watching birds at their feeders. "I kind of wanted to help them out," said the Sacred Heart School sixth-grader from Reisterstown. "I wanted to find out if the looks of the bird feeder affected how many birds were attracted to it. " So, Christopher, 12, applied the scientific method. And the results of his experiments with feeders — identical except for their colors — were presented Sunday at the 56th Baltimore Science Fair, at Towson University.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jennifer Hill and Jennifer Hill,COX NEWS SERVICE | February 21, 2002
It's February, time to start thinking about science fair projects. I am always amazed at the incredible variety of uniquely interesting topics students find to tackle. Over the past couple of years, I have come to appreciate how helpful the Internet can be in the sometimes arduous road to project completion. "Your Science Fair Project Resource Guide" on the Internet Public Library site at www.ipl.org/youth/projectguide is well designed and a good place to look for help for science projects.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2011
Christopher Briggs' science project grew out of his grandparents' love of watching birds at their feeders. "I kind of wanted to help them out," said the Sacred Heart School sixth-grader from Reisterstown. "I wanted to find out if the looks of the bird feeder affected how many birds were attracted to it. " So, Christopher, 12, applied the scientific method. And the results of his experiments with feeders — identical except for their colors — were presented Sunday at the 56th Baltimore Science Fair, at Towson University.
NEWS
April 2, 1991
Court didn't ban praying in public schoolsYou should not be party to spreading such a misconception!Russ SeeseAberdeenNot a sciencePaul Greenberg's column, "A case of scientific heresy" (March 20), erroneously gives credence to "creation science" by treating it as scientific heresy. True scientific heresy is new, competing theory or a variation of a theory based on the use of the scientific method. "Creation science" does not even merit that definition because it is religious dogma disguised, at least partly, as science.
NEWS
October 31, 2011
The letter from Donald Boesch, "Climate change is real" (Oct 29) seems to typify for me the problem underlying many of these science vs. special interest debates that constantly roil public opinion in the U.S. and prevent the effective implementation of common sense public policy. Climate change and environmental policy is not the only example. Evolution and the origins of the universe are other famous examples which have affected education policy, and we see the first glimmers of new issues arising regarding vaccination and health policy.
NEWS
August 25, 2005
Wondrous world isn't the result of any `design' Thanks to years of experience offering the general public looks through my telescope at the moon, planets and stars, I think I understand where the intelligent designers are coming from ("Frist backs teaching of intelligent design," Aug. 20). Reacting to the breathtaking beauty of what they have glimpsed, occasionally a looker will turn to me and ask, "Don't you agree, only God could have created such a thing?" Being a nonbeliever and wishing to avoid controversy, I usually reply, "I'll take the Fifth Amendment on that."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | January 23, 2005
Postcards From the Brain Museum: The Improbable Search for Meaning in the Matter of Famous Minds, by Brian Burrell. Broadway Books. 356 pages. $24.95. After Vladimir Lenin died in 1924, the Soviet leadership decided to appoint someone to study the great man's brain. Somewhere in the folds and fissures lay the secret to Lenin's genius - a physical explanation for the qualities that enabled one human among many to change history. Even then, there was nothing revolutionary about the idea of preserving the brain and studying it for clues to what made people smart, stupid, criminal or creative.
NEWS
December 9, 2007
THE BLACK LIZARD BIG BOOK OF PULPS Edited by Otto Penzler Vintage / 1,200 pages / $25 For the pulp magazine enthusiast: For those who dearly miss Black Mask and Mike Shayne Mystery Magazine and yearn for Hard Case Crime to up their release schedule from one paperback a month, this will provide you with many, many hours of perusing. Otto Penzler has assembled a more than generous helping of pulp goodness ranging from a previously unpublished Dashiell Hammett story, two novels by early masters Carroll John Daly and Frederick Nabel and over 40 additional tales by the likes of James M. Cain, Erle Stanley Gardner, Cornel Woolrich and Raymond Chandler, to formerly forgotten scribes Eric Taylor, Paul Cain and Steve Fisher (to name a few)
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,Sun reporter | August 26, 2007
Police chemist Joshua Yohannan crushed the pink Ecstasy tablet with a mortar and pestle, dripped a solution of sulfuric acid and formaldehyde into a plastic tray, and then sprinkled the pink powder on top of it. Yohannan expected the mixture to turn purple and then black. He hoped that a few granules would turn orange. And that is what happened. The triple-color change meant that the pill with the bunny logo contained MDMA, or Ecstasy, and methamphetamine, a far more dangerous and addictive drug.
NEWS
August 25, 2005
Wondrous world isn't the result of any `design' Thanks to years of experience offering the general public looks through my telescope at the moon, planets and stars, I think I understand where the intelligent designers are coming from ("Frist backs teaching of intelligent design," Aug. 20). Reacting to the breathtaking beauty of what they have glimpsed, occasionally a looker will turn to me and ask, "Don't you agree, only God could have created such a thing?" Being a nonbeliever and wishing to avoid controversy, I usually reply, "I'll take the Fifth Amendment on that."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | January 23, 2005
Postcards From the Brain Museum: The Improbable Search for Meaning in the Matter of Famous Minds, by Brian Burrell. Broadway Books. 356 pages. $24.95. After Vladimir Lenin died in 1924, the Soviet leadership decided to appoint someone to study the great man's brain. Somewhere in the folds and fissures lay the secret to Lenin's genius - a physical explanation for the qualities that enabled one human among many to change history. Even then, there was nothing revolutionary about the idea of preserving the brain and studying it for clues to what made people smart, stupid, criminal or creative.
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 9, 2004
When he retired after more than 38 years in research and development at Washington's Walter Reed Army Medical Center, the last thing biochemist Nesbitt D. Brown wanted was a second career. But when Howard High School invited him to be its volunteer scientist-in-residence, Brown couldn't resist. The 70-year-old Columbia resident hasn't missed a Tuesday or Thursday in eight years of working with students. "I never had time to go into that blue mode, depression," after retiring, Brown said.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | October 26, 2003
AMONG YOGI Berra's famous malapropisms, "This is like deja vu all over again" has become a cliche. No doubt that's why it kept coming to mind Wednesday, as 367 Maryland educators gathered at Turf Valley conference center in Ellicott City to launch a multiyear, $66 million campaign to help Maryland children learn to read. From state schools Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick and several of the nation's eminent reading researchers, the educators heard a familiar litany: Four of every 10 Maryland third-graders lack proficiency in reading.
NEWS
December 9, 2007
THE BLACK LIZARD BIG BOOK OF PULPS Edited by Otto Penzler Vintage / 1,200 pages / $25 For the pulp magazine enthusiast: For those who dearly miss Black Mask and Mike Shayne Mystery Magazine and yearn for Hard Case Crime to up their release schedule from one paperback a month, this will provide you with many, many hours of perusing. Otto Penzler has assembled a more than generous helping of pulp goodness ranging from a previously unpublished Dashiell Hammett story, two novels by early masters Carroll John Daly and Frederick Nabel and over 40 additional tales by the likes of James M. Cain, Erle Stanley Gardner, Cornel Woolrich and Raymond Chandler, to formerly forgotten scribes Eric Taylor, Paul Cain and Steve Fisher (to name a few)
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,Sun reporter | August 26, 2007
Police chemist Joshua Yohannan crushed the pink Ecstasy tablet with a mortar and pestle, dripped a solution of sulfuric acid and formaldehyde into a plastic tray, and then sprinkled the pink powder on top of it. Yohannan expected the mixture to turn purple and then black. He hoped that a few granules would turn orange. And that is what happened. The triple-color change meant that the pill with the bunny logo contained MDMA, or Ecstasy, and methamphetamine, a far more dangerous and addictive drug.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | March 31, 2003
Can a small rodent known as the prairie vole, caring for her cub, tell us anything about the health benefits of parental love? Did people with a deep sense of spirituality suffer less trauma from the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, than others? Can the feuding Hutus and Tutsis of Rwanda ever reconcile after the brutal massacre of hundreds of thousands during the country's civil war? Thanks to a millionaire investor turned religious philanthropist, researchers are pursuing answers to these questions and others involving abstract notions such as love, forgiveness and spiritual transformation.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jennifer Hill and Jennifer Hill,COX NEWS SERVICE | February 21, 2002
It's February, time to start thinking about science fair projects. I am always amazed at the incredible variety of uniquely interesting topics students find to tackle. Over the past couple of years, I have come to appreciate how helpful the Internet can be in the sometimes arduous road to project completion. "Your Science Fair Project Resource Guide" on the Internet Public Library site at www.ipl.org/youth/projectguide is well designed and a good place to look for help for science projects.
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