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NEWS
September 12, 2011
As one of the more than 1,200 people arrested outside the White House during the recent tar sands action protesting plans to build a crude oil pipeline from Canada through the American heartland, I'm always amused by the Republican claim that climate change is just a theory, or worse, a hoax. Unless we all get PhDs in climate science, we have to accept the opinion of experts in the field who overwhelmingly endorse global climate change as both a reality and as something influenced by human activity.
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
The state's highest court ordered a new trial Wednesday for a former Baltimore police sergeant convicted nearly two decades ago of murdering his young mistress - a ruling that could affect cases that relied on bullet testing used for decades until being debunked. Gina Nueslein, a 22-year-old clerk at a Royal Farms, became entangled with Sgt. James Kulbicki, who was 14 years her senior, in a relationship that soured as she sued him for child support. Twenty years later, Kulbicki has a chance to demonstrate the innocence he has maintained, but Nueslein's family must experience the ordeal of her death again.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Michael Dresser and Andrea F. Siegel and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | October 24, 2001
A broad court rule permitting the reopening of criminal cases at any time based on new DNA and other scientific evidence will take effect across Maryland in January. The Court of Appeals rule goes beyond legislation enacted this year, which wiped out a one-year time limit for felons convicted of murder, manslaughter and violent sex crimes to seek post-conviction DNA testing and reopen a case based on results. This rule erases the time limit for all inmates and covers scientific evidence beyond DNA, making it one of the broadest provisions of its type, advocates say. Nationwide, there has been concern that prisons hold some wrongly convicted inmates.
NEWS
By Lorne Garrettson and Richard L. Humphrey | December 30, 2012
Every day, Marylanders are exposed to pesticides in our drinking water, on our food and through chemicals in our homes, lawns and public spaces. We also encounter pesticides in our rivers and streams and the Chesapeake Bay. While these exposures are often in small doses, growing evidence suggests they can add up to great harm. Unfortunately, the very public health officials responsible for protecting us are denied basic information about when and where dangerous pesticides are used. In Maryland, it is almost impossible for health care providers, public health experts and biomedical researchers to accurately understand the risks pesticides pose.
NEWS
January 27, 2009
The winds of change brought to Washington by the nation's new chief executive may be clearing the air in more ways than one. President Barack Obama yesterday asked federal regulators to re-examine past decisions regarding vehicle tailpipe emissions and fuel efficiency standards that could lead to significant reductions in greenhouse gases and less dependence on foreign oil. Mr. Obama had promised a greener - and smarter - energy future during his presidential...
NEWS
May 10, 2012
I devoted my entire professional career to working with individuals stigmatized by drug addiction. Yet during that time I saw the pendulum swing from addiction being treated as a moral weakness to the disease-based model backed by science. I'm now witnessing a similar evolution in my volunteer work with an animal rescue group that over the years has become very familiar with pit bulls. The recent Maryland Court of Appeals decision designating all pit bull type dogs as inherently dangerous is based on myths, not facts.
NEWS
By Gio Batta Gori | April 15, 1993
LAST MONTH, the Supreme Court heard arguments on case to update the rules about what is scientific evidence admissible to a jury. These rules have raised questions because they aim at validating the credentials of witnesses rather than the scientific substance of the evidence.Beyond judicial matters, any decision of the court will also influence the objectivity of the wider social debate that defines the American way in this country and abroad.The case is Daubert vs. Merrell Dow and the allegation is that Bendectin -- a morning-sickness remedy -- causes birth defects.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | September 28, 2000
The Bi-State Blue Crab Advisory Committee recommended a bay-wide harvest limit of 54 million pounds of crabs yesterday as some 175 watermen stood watch in a crowded state hearing room in Annapolis. The crabbers, summoned by Larry Simns, president of the Maryland Watermen's Association, complained bitterly during the day-long meeting that scientists who proposed the limit used incorrect information to create their complicated statistical model and failed to consider the effect predators have on the crab population.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Staff Writer | December 28, 1994
A man charged with killing two women in Severn last year asked an Anne Arundel Circuit judge yesterday to let his defense experts evaluate the scientific evidence against him.Darris Ware, 23, of no fixed address, could get the death penalty if he is convicted in the Dec. 30, 1993, deaths of Betina Gentry, 18, and her neighbor, Cynthia Vega-Allen, 22. The women were found shot to death in Ms. Gentry's Severn home.Mr. Ware, who was engaged to Ms. Gentry, is scheduled to be tried March 8.At yesterday's hearing, assistant public defenders Mark Blumberg and Robert Waldman asked Judge Lawrence Rushworth to allow four cartridges and four bullets from a .38-caliber pistol to be transported, under police escort, to a Belair laboratory where they would be examined by a defense firearms expert.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | February 26, 2002
A federal judge in Baltimore began an unprecedented exploration yesterday of the scientific evidence surrounding the high-stakes question of whether wireless telephones can cause cancer. The weeklong evidence hearing before U.S. District Judge Catherine C. Blake will mark the most detailed public review of the competing scientific research on a possible link between cell phones and cancer. It also could help determine the fate of future lawsuits against the nation's $45 billion wireless communications industry.
NEWS
May 10, 2012
I devoted my entire professional career to working with individuals stigmatized by drug addiction. Yet during that time I saw the pendulum swing from addiction being treated as a moral weakness to the disease-based model backed by science. I'm now witnessing a similar evolution in my volunteer work with an animal rescue group that over the years has become very familiar with pit bulls. The recent Maryland Court of Appeals decision designating all pit bull type dogs as inherently dangerous is based on myths, not facts.
NEWS
September 12, 2011
As one of the more than 1,200 people arrested outside the White House during the recent tar sands action protesting plans to build a crude oil pipeline from Canada through the American heartland, I'm always amused by the Republican claim that climate change is just a theory, or worse, a hoax. Unless we all get PhDs in climate science, we have to accept the opinion of experts in the field who overwhelmingly endorse global climate change as both a reality and as something influenced by human activity.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | June 19, 2011
Maryland Public Television is set to air a polemical film about Lyme disease that is built on fear-provoking speculations and assertions while advancing a central message that has been discredited by experts in infectious diseases. Despite being apprised of the film's serious flaws, MPT has "Under Our Skin: A Health Care Nightmare" on its afternoon schedule for June 26. Other stations throughout the Public Broadcasting Service also have "Under Our Skin: on their schedules; some already aired it. The program was distributed free to stations by the National Educational Telecommunications Association.
NEWS
January 27, 2009
The winds of change brought to Washington by the nation's new chief executive may be clearing the air in more ways than one. President Barack Obama yesterday asked federal regulators to re-examine past decisions regarding vehicle tailpipe emissions and fuel efficiency standards that could lead to significant reductions in greenhouse gases and less dependence on foreign oil. Mr. Obama had promised a greener - and smarter - energy future during his presidential...
NEWS
By Janet Rosenbaum | January 16, 2009
It's a paradox worthy of the federal government: Abstinence-only education inhibits the effective promotion of abstinence. It is possible to keep teens abstinent, at least temporarily. More than a dozen programs have been shown, in peer-reviewed studies, to delay teen sex. For example, the Becoming a Responsible Teen program helped low-income African-American teenagers in Mississippi both to delay sex and to have safer sex, and its effects were visible one year later: Only 12 percent of sexually inexperienced participants became sexually active, compared with 31 percent in the comparison group.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2008
Farm organizations around the country are lining up to offer their congratulations to President-elect Barack Obama, who will take over the White House in January. "We have appreciated Sen. Obama's leadership on issues ranging from strong safety net programs within the farm bill to the promotion of corn-based ethanol as an important source of domestic energy," Bob Dickey, president of the 32,000-member National Corn Growers Association, said in letter of congratulations to the president.
NEWS
By Paul R. Gross | February 28, 2005
AROUND THE country, the debate over evolution in public schools is again incendiary. The new critics of evolution - including those in Cecil County - promote alternative "theories" claimed to deserve the same study in science classes as the evidence-based modern science of evolution. However, the main current competitor, "intelligent design theory," is far from suitable for such a purpose. Cecil County and others should examine the facts before giving intelligent design and similar creationisms time in science class.
NEWS
By Paul C. Giannelli | August 25, 1994
Cleveland -- THE O.J. Simpson case, scheduled to go to trial next month, hinges on scientific evidence.Just this week prosecutors revealed that preliminary genetic testing suggests matches between blood of the ex-pro football player and those found at the scene where his wife, Nicole Simpson was killed.The DNA analysis of the blood found at the murder scene places him in an extremely small category of people whose blood shares the same characteristics.A criminal justice system based on skillful investigation that includes scientific evidence is obviously better than one that relies only on conventional methods like eyewitness identifications, which can be unreliable and confessions, which are subject to abuse.
NEWS
By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar and Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 11, 2007
WASHINGTON -- President Bush's first surgeon general testified yesterday that his speeches were censored to match administration political positions and that he was prevented from giving the public accurate scientific information on issues such as stem cell research and teen pregnancy prevention. "Anything that doesn't fit into the political appointees' ideological, theological or political agenda is ignored, marginalized or simply buried," said Dr. Richard H. Carmona, surgeon general from 2002 to 2006, to a House committee.
NEWS
By GLENN C. ALTSCHULER and GLENN C. ALTSCHULER,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 13, 2006
Ghost Hunters: William James and the Search For Scientific Proof of Life After Death Deborah Blum The Penguin Press / 371 pages / $24.95 When his father died, William James, the renowned psychologist and philosopher, grew "dizzy" with the possibility of immortality. Although friends warned him that those who sought proof of life after death were often deemed "weak in the head," James joined other researchers in the United States and England in a Society for Psychical Research. In nature, James claimed, "all things are provisional, half-fitted to each other and untidy."
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