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NEWS
January 27, 1991
PRO:Battered women who kill their abusers should be allowed to tell the whole story in court.That's the bottom line for their sympathizers.But if a pattern of physical abuse can be considered a defense for homicide, will other women be encouraged to kill?Absolutely not, say those who support changes in state law to allow such testimony.Battered spousesyndrome is a state of mind that judges and jurors must consider, they insist. When women take the desperate step of killing their abusers, they generally do so in a lull between episodes.
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NEWS
By Nancy C. Unger | September 16, 2012
Mitt Romney wants to open up more federal lands and waters to drilling for oil and natural gas. His party is pushing, in the name of freedom and economic opportunity, to roll back a variety of environmental protections. Republicans, including U.S. Sen. Pat Roberts of Kansas, are seeking to ease pesticide regulations; some are even questioning the Environmental Protection Agency's ban on DDT, reopening a controversy that stretches back half a century. Fifty years ago this month, Rachel Carson published "Silent Spring.
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NEWS
December 11, 2011
Former ambassador to China and GOP presidential primary contender Jon Huntsman normally takes reasonable positions, but he has waffled on the question of global warming ("Gingrich has double-digit lead in new national poll," Dec. 7). Mr. Huntsman was quoted in The Sun as requesting the scientific community to state its position on whether humans have played a role in climate change more clearly. Mr. Huntsman should be aware that the National Academies of Sciences, the nation's spokesman for the scientific community, has unequivocally stated that global warming is in part man made and poses an serious threat to mankind.
NEWS
August 18, 2012
Kudos to the National Science Foundation and the states of Maryland and Delaware for adopting a curriculum to teach the science of global warming and climate change ("A grant to help teach climate change," Aug. 16). We need to address this issue before we witness parts of the Inner Harbor and the Eastern Shore go underwater. Some may dispute the approach, but there's no dispute among the scientific community about whether climate change represents an existential threat to the planet unless humans take drastic steps to reverse the trend.
NEWS
November 3, 1994
A letter to the editor from Joan Butler published yesterday should have read, ". . . for the past 30 or more years the subject of intelligence has been taboo for the public at large, but not within the scientific community."The Sun regrets the errors.
NEWS
July 13, 2012
The Sun's recent reader poll ("What Maryland thinks," July 10) shows that a majority of those responding to this "not scientific" survey doubt that man made climate changes contributed to recent weather extremes. As one who holds an advanced degree in science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, I disagree. If you had polled only accredited scientists, I wager about 99 percent would have stated that global warming, in fact, has contributed to recent weather events. In the scientific community, this has become the accepted and undisputed position for years and is a position adopted by the National Academy of Sciences.
NEWS
August 18, 2012
Kudos to the National Science Foundation and the states of Maryland and Delaware for adopting a curriculum to teach the science of global warming and climate change ("A grant to help teach climate change," Aug. 16). We need to address this issue before we witness parts of the Inner Harbor and the Eastern Shore go underwater. Some may dispute the approach, but there's no dispute among the scientific community about whether climate change represents an existential threat to the planet unless humans take drastic steps to reverse the trend.
FEATURES
By DAVE BARRY | July 9, 1995
Today I wish to present further evidence that the scientific community has completely lost its mind.Exhibit A is an article that appeared recently on the front page of the New York Times (motto: "Even We Don't Read the Whole Thing"). The article concerns a scientist named Dr. Raul J. Cano, who got hold of a bee that died 30 million years ago and was preserved in amber.Now here is the difference between a scientist and a sane layperson such as yourself: If you came across a bee that had been dead for 30 million years, your natural, common-sense reaction would be to stomp on it just in case, then maybe use it as part of a prank involving a salad bar. But that was not Dr. Cano's scientific reaction.
NEWS
By Mona Charen | September 3, 1992
SEN. Al Gore is a scary guy. Though today, as a candidate for vice president, he smiles and aw-shucks his retreat from some of the proposals in his book, "Earth in the Balance," the work itself reveals him to be a glazed-eyed, environmental ideologue.The tone of the tome is urgent earnestness. Like all converts, Mr. Gore is impatient with those who continue to doubt. Doubts never cloud his new vision -- nor does he trouble much about factual accuracy. The book, for all its fine organization and skilled (if pedantic)
NEWS
By Arthur Caplan | June 18, 1993
JURASSIC Park" has arrived, and when Hollywood and science mix, watch out. Those who make movies like their scientists mad, bad and more than a tad morally corrupt. From Dr. Frankenstein and his goofing around with corpses and electricity to the folks in white coats whose nuclear shenanigans brought you Godzilla and Mothra, the silver screen has had few kind words for nerds with advanced degrees in science and technology."Jurassic Park" falls smack in the cinematic tradition that holds that science ain't no friend of yours or mine.
NEWS
July 13, 2012
The Sun's recent reader poll ("What Maryland thinks," July 10) shows that a majority of those responding to this "not scientific" survey doubt that man made climate changes contributed to recent weather extremes. As one who holds an advanced degree in science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, I disagree. If you had polled only accredited scientists, I wager about 99 percent would have stated that global warming, in fact, has contributed to recent weather events. In the scientific community, this has become the accepted and undisputed position for years and is a position adopted by the National Academy of Sciences.
NEWS
December 27, 2011
Albert Einstein once said the reason he was able to accomplish so much was because he had "stood on the shoulders of giants" like Newton and Galileo. The Nobel Prize-winning physicist's remark was a reminder how much scientists depend on discoveries made by others. The system depends on the free and unfettered exchange of ideas, which is why the government's effort to restrict publication of research that it says could be used by terrorists has sparked a controversy over how to balance the need for openness against concerns that certain kinds of information might be misused.
NEWS
December 11, 2011
Former ambassador to China and GOP presidential primary contender Jon Huntsman normally takes reasonable positions, but he has waffled on the question of global warming ("Gingrich has double-digit lead in new national poll," Dec. 7). Mr. Huntsman was quoted in The Sun as requesting the scientific community to state its position on whether humans have played a role in climate change more clearly. Mr. Huntsman should be aware that the National Academies of Sciences, the nation's spokesman for the scientific community, has unequivocally stated that global warming is in part man made and poses an serious threat to mankind.
NEWS
By Alan I. Leshner | July 16, 2007
The House of Representatives last week passed a resolution that condemns an initiative by the leadership of Britain's largest academic union to boycott Israel's academic community. The world's largest general scientific society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, supports the House resolution and calls on members of the University and College Union to reject the boycott proposal as counter to the goals, values and culture of global science. It would be a momentous misstep for the University and College Union's membership to use a boycott to demonstrate its disapproval of Israel's policies toward the Palestinians.
NEWS
February 18, 2005
State did what it could to help troubled youths "Tragic" is the right description for the lives of both young men, Philip E. Parker Jr. and Kevin G. Johns Jr. But for The Sun to imply that they both went begging for help from the state and did not receive it doesn't sound right. According to "Parallel Lives, Tragic Ending" (Feb. 13), the Department of Social Services came into Kevin Johns' life when he was 3 years old. He was in and out of foster homes and institutions until age 18. He was diagnosed with many disorders.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Sara Neufeld and Laura Barnhardt and Sara Neufeld,SUN STAFF | December 15, 2004
As parents of pupils at McCormick Elementary School in Rosedale received letters yesterday about the absence of a principal accused of sexually assaulting two pupils in the late 1970s, experts in law and psychology said the case might highlight issues arising from "recovered" memories. Kevin M. Lindsey, 50, is accused of sexually assaulting two sisters more than two decades ago while he was a teacher at Pine Grove Elementary School in Carney. Both women say they recently remembered being assaulted, according to police charging documents.
FEATURES
By Dave Barry | May 5, 1991
When you have been an experienced, highly accurate professional journalist for as long as I have, you develop a "sixth sense" for spotting a news trend that has the two elements that are absolutely essential for a major story:DTC 1. The potential destruction of all life on the planet.2. Cows.I regret to report that we are experiencing such a trend now.Consider the following true items:Item one: According to newspaper articles sent in by many alert readers, livestock in England are experiencing an epidemic of "Mad Cow Disease," a disorder that strikes the brains of cows (Yes!
NEWS
By Alan I. Leshner | July 16, 2007
The House of Representatives last week passed a resolution that condemns an initiative by the leadership of Britain's largest academic union to boycott Israel's academic community. The world's largest general scientific society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, supports the House resolution and calls on members of the University and College Union to reject the boycott proposal as counter to the goals, values and culture of global science. It would be a momentous misstep for the University and College Union's membership to use a boycott to demonstrate its disapproval of Israel's policies toward the Palestinians.
NEWS
By Dave Barry | October 3, 2004
OVER THE YEARS, I have been harshly critical of the scientific community for wasting time researching things nobody cares about, such as the universe. I don't know about you, but I'm tired of reading newspaper stories like this: "Using a giant telescope, astronomers at the prestigious Crudwinkle Observatory have observed a teensy light smudge that they say is a humongous galaxy cluster 17 jillion light years away, which would make it the farthest-away thing that astronomers have discovered this week.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | February 24, 1998
BOSTON -- Sometimes after the smoke clears and the dueling experts have put their guns away, the most injured body left on the courtroom floor is the one called science.Maybe the case was about breast implants or DNA. Maybe the plaintiffs were wrangling over PCBs or plain old whiplash.Maybe the experts were mercenaries with opinions for hire. Maybe the struggle was between science and it's evil twin, junk science.Problem on the benchAnyway you look at it, this familiar courtroom drama is the result of an era that is both high-tech and highly litigious.
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