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NEWS
November 22, 2006
APL's Cutchis is honored Dr. Protagoras "Tag" Cutchis, a senior engineer at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in North Laurel, has been named to the "Scientific American 50," the magazine's annual list of leaders in science and technology. The list, which recognizes leaders in research, business and policy in several technological categories, will appear in next month's issue of Scientific American. Cutchis was selected for developing an invention that could enable amputees to communicate desired movements to a prosthetic device by simply thinking about them.
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EXPLORE
November 8, 2012
The article "Dinosaur hunters know where to look in Laurel" in the Oct. 25 issue of the Laurel Leader begins, "It's true: Dinosaurs once roamed in Laurel. Of course, that was about 110 million years ago. ... " I wonder if anyone was there to see what the reporter confidently asserts. Or do dinosaur fossils come with little tags attached saying: "Hi, I am 110 millions years old"? Actually, the idea that fossils are millions of years old originated about 200 years ago among people such as James Hutton and Charles Lyell, who didn't like the Biblical account of Noah's flood.
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NEWS
By Paul Greenberg | March 20, 1991
ONE BY ONE the icons of the age begin to crack. Freudianism, the ultimate answer of the 1920s to Man's Eternal Quest, now occupies an intellectual status somewhere between the hula-hoop and the Tucker automobile. Doctor Freud himself becomes recognized as a poet rather than scientist, though he set out to be the scientist who was going to demystify the poetry of our psyches. History is full of ironies. Now it has turned against Karl Marx, who assured all that it was on his side. Nothing turns out to be so evitable as the Inevitable Tide of History.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2011
The Scientific American blog network has a juicy looking collection of posts up on the subject of food and eating. The round-up is called Passions of Food . I have to admit, I love this stuff, especially the articles by anthropologists. Some of the posts were produced freshly for this round-up; others, like Bora Zivkovic's Do you love or Hate or Cilantro? , are from the archives, I've barely cracked the spine, but I'm looking forward to Krytal D'Costa on the culture of  coffee drinkers and Christie Wilcox on the myths of organic farming . Bt right now, though, I'm going to read D'Costa's Are We Ashamed of Lunch?
BUSINESS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe | February 19, 1995
Nominations sought for entrepreneur awardsThe Maryland Chapter of the Entrepreneur of the Year Institute is seeking nominations for its sixth annual entrepreneur of the year Awards, sponsored by Ernst & Young, Inc. magazine, Merrill Lynch & Co., The Baltimore Sun Co., law firm Piper & Marbury and Sprint Corp.Maryland winners will compete in the nationwide program, which was created in 1986 by Ernst & Young to honor outstanding owners of emerging companies.Nominations, which do not require a fee, must be received by April 7. Finalists will be announced May 25 and winners June 27 at an awards banquet at the Hyatt Regency in Baltimore.
FEATURES
January 17, 2008
Dr. Robert Rohwer of Baltimore Veterans Affairs Medical Center will receive the Scientific American Award, according to this month's Scientific American magazine. For 30 years, Rohwer has done research on mad cow disease (found in humans and cows) and scrapie (found in sheep and goats). He is receiving this award because he developed a protective mechanism, or filter, that might be able to cleanse red blood cells of disease-causing factors.
NEWS
January 14, 1993
A NEW study, reported in the December Scientific American, once again concludes that Asian schools are doing a better job teaching kids than American schools. No surprise there.But the study's conclusions about what the Asian schools are doing right challenge conventional wisdom. The article, written by Harold W. Stevenson, a professor of psychology at the University of Michigan, reports:"During the past decade, it has become a truism that American students are not being adequately prepared to compete in a global economy.
EXPLORE
November 8, 2012
The article "Dinosaur hunters know where to look in Laurel" in the Oct. 25 issue of the Laurel Leader begins, "It's true: Dinosaurs once roamed in Laurel. Of course, that was about 110 million years ago. ... " I wonder if anyone was there to see what the reporter confidently asserts. Or do dinosaur fossils come with little tags attached saying: "Hi, I am 110 millions years old"? Actually, the idea that fossils are millions of years old originated about 200 years ago among people such as James Hutton and Charles Lyell, who didn't like the Biblical account of Noah's flood.
FEATURES
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Sun Staff Writer | August 1, 1994
Just in for the hip Asian-American man is the new magazine XO, touted as the first national publication targeted at a readership often perceived as industrious, servile and square.Varying parts Men's Health, Scientific American, Playboy and Omni, the first issue of the California-based magazine includes articles such as "Are Men Obsolete?" (a lengthy essay about women's empowerment fueling "a needless war between the sexes") and "Japan's Last Chance" (about the change required for the country to remain an economic powerhouse)
FEATURES
By Jan Freeman and Jan Freeman,Boston Globe | May 1, 1994
Worth's May cover story, "The Frequent Flier Rip-Off," is the very best kind of consumer reporting -- the kind that tells you to stop worrying about comparison shopping (in this case, for frequent-flier miles) and invest your energies in some pursuit with a better rate of return.Comparing the airlines' reward systems with other "frequency-marketing discounts," or rebates to the best customers, writer Jeff Blyskal finds them among the chintziest: The value of frequent-flier freebies, he calculates, averages a 3.3 percent effective discount, with a high of 6 percent (Southwest Airlines)
FEATURES
January 17, 2008
Dr. Robert Rohwer of Baltimore Veterans Affairs Medical Center will receive the Scientific American Award, according to this month's Scientific American magazine. For 30 years, Rohwer has done research on mad cow disease (found in humans and cows) and scrapie (found in sheep and goats). He is receiving this award because he developed a protective mechanism, or filter, that might be able to cleanse red blood cells of disease-causing factors.
NEWS
November 22, 2006
APL's Cutchis is honored Dr. Protagoras "Tag" Cutchis, a senior engineer at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in North Laurel, has been named to the "Scientific American 50," the magazine's annual list of leaders in science and technology. The list, which recognizes leaders in research, business and policy in several technological categories, will appear in next month's issue of Scientific American. Cutchis was selected for developing an invention that could enable amputees to communicate desired movements to a prosthetic device by simply thinking about them.
FEATURES
By Connie Koenenn and Connie Koenenn,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 12, 1998
Women's health gets a head-to-toe examination in a stand-alone issue of Scientific American . Titled Scientific American Presents Women's Health: A Lifelong Guide, the 120-page magazine, published for summer 1998, outlines new findings in specific age groups from the teens to 70s and older and examines lifelong measures to ensure good health.After years of treating women like "men with a uterus," said editor Carol Ezell, researchers are finding definite gender differences in many areas, including addiction, depression and autoimmune diseases, as well as in reactions to pain and anesthesia.
BUSINESS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe | February 19, 1995
Nominations sought for entrepreneur awardsThe Maryland Chapter of the Entrepreneur of the Year Institute is seeking nominations for its sixth annual entrepreneur of the year Awards, sponsored by Ernst & Young, Inc. magazine, Merrill Lynch & Co., The Baltimore Sun Co., law firm Piper & Marbury and Sprint Corp.Maryland winners will compete in the nationwide program, which was created in 1986 by Ernst & Young to honor outstanding owners of emerging companies.Nominations, which do not require a fee, must be received by April 7. Finalists will be announced May 25 and winners June 27 at an awards banquet at the Hyatt Regency in Baltimore.
FEATURES
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Sun Staff Writer | August 1, 1994
Just in for the hip Asian-American man is the new magazine XO, touted as the first national publication targeted at a readership often perceived as industrious, servile and square.Varying parts Men's Health, Scientific American, Playboy and Omni, the first issue of the California-based magazine includes articles such as "Are Men Obsolete?" (a lengthy essay about women's empowerment fueling "a needless war between the sexes") and "Japan's Last Chance" (about the change required for the country to remain an economic powerhouse)
FEATURES
By Jan Freeman and Jan Freeman,Boston Globe | May 1, 1994
Worth's May cover story, "The Frequent Flier Rip-Off," is the very best kind of consumer reporting -- the kind that tells you to stop worrying about comparison shopping (in this case, for frequent-flier miles) and invest your energies in some pursuit with a better rate of return.Comparing the airlines' reward systems with other "frequency-marketing discounts," or rebates to the best customers, writer Jeff Blyskal finds them among the chintziest: The value of frequent-flier freebies, he calculates, averages a 3.3 percent effective discount, with a high of 6 percent (Southwest Airlines)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2011
The Scientific American blog network has a juicy looking collection of posts up on the subject of food and eating. The round-up is called Passions of Food . I have to admit, I love this stuff, especially the articles by anthropologists. Some of the posts were produced freshly for this round-up; others, like Bora Zivkovic's Do you love or Hate or Cilantro? , are from the archives, I've barely cracked the spine, but I'm looking forward to Krytal D'Costa on the culture of  coffee drinkers and Christie Wilcox on the myths of organic farming . Bt right now, though, I'm going to read D'Costa's Are We Ashamed of Lunch?
FEATURES
By Connie Koenenn and Connie Koenenn,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 12, 1998
Women's health gets a head-to-toe examination in a stand-alone issue of Scientific American . Titled Scientific American Presents Women's Health: A Lifelong Guide, the 120-page magazine, published for summer 1998, outlines new findings in specific age groups from the teens to 70s and older and examines lifelong measures to ensure good health.After years of treating women like "men with a uterus," said editor Carol Ezell, researchers are finding definite gender differences in many areas, including addiction, depression and autoimmune diseases, as well as in reactions to pain and anesthesia.
NEWS
January 14, 1993
A NEW study, reported in the December Scientific American, once again concludes that Asian schools are doing a better job teaching kids than American schools. No surprise there.But the study's conclusions about what the Asian schools are doing right challenge conventional wisdom. The article, written by Harold W. Stevenson, a professor of psychology at the University of Michigan, reports:"During the past decade, it has become a truism that American students are not being adequately prepared to compete in a global economy.
NEWS
By Paul Greenberg | March 20, 1991
ONE BY ONE the icons of the age begin to crack. Freudianism, the ultimate answer of the 1920s to Man's Eternal Quest, now occupies an intellectual status somewhere between the hula-hoop and the Tucker automobile. Doctor Freud himself becomes recognized as a poet rather than scientist, though he set out to be the scientist who was going to demystify the poetry of our psyches. History is full of ironies. Now it has turned against Karl Marx, who assured all that it was on his side. Nothing turns out to be so evitable as the Inevitable Tide of History.
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