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By Eileen Ogintz and Eileen Ogintz,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | January 19, 1997
The Ferrys and the Milases have two words for those planning a winter getaway with friends or family: science museum.That's right. Pack the sleeping bags, toothbrushes, a few snacks and head to a nearby science museum between your home and that of those you want to visit."
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TRAVEL
By Stephanie Citron, For The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2013
Few people can recognize the yearning to escape better than Carla Hayden, chief executive officer of the Enoch Pratt Library. As a librarian, she has spent many years helping her curious clientele explore new realms and journey to wondrous places through books. So when Hayden decides that it's time to turn the page or open a new chapter in her life, it is no wonder she favors a destination famed like no other for its joie de vivre - Paris. We caught up with her to chat about her Parisian adventures and her favorite hidden treasures.
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NEWS
By Rob Kasper and Rob Kasper,SUN STAFF | November 10, 1999
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- When Graham Banks arrived at a gala in Kansas City's refurbished Union Station last week, he immediately looked at the ceilings.Gazing at ceilings is a habit of the Portsmouth, England, native, who is general manager of the Baltimore firm Hayles & Howe, an ornamental plaster enterprise that restored the lofty reaches of grand old buildings such as Union Station.As ceilings go, Banks says, the ones in Kansas City's train station are stunners."I thought the Postal Museum was a big project," he says, referring to the ceilings of the Smithsonian's National Postal Museum in Washington.
TRAVEL
By RICHARD P. CARPENTER and RICHARD P. CARPENTER,THE BOSTON GLOBE | August 13, 2006
You may know that Philadelphia is filled with history, fine dining and plenty of culture. But you may not be aware of the city's many outdoor opportunities - among them hiking, biking, rowing, fishing, sailing, running, horseback riding and even dog walking. To acquaint visitors with the possibilities, the city has launched a $1.7 million campaign called Boundless Philadelphia, with the details at gophila.com/outdoors. Such fresh-air fun adds one more reason to visit this nearby destination, where deals are easy to come by. Here are a few: You might want to lock in a low price for the Bed, Breakfast and Prison package at the Best Western Center City Hotel.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2004
Music Carl Thomas brings a grown-up, rich vocal sound to his sophomore album, Let's Talk About It. page 25 Eats More than 250 years after Reynolds Tavern opened in Annapolis, the building is home to Sly Fox Pub, as well as a tea room and an inn. page 20 Family Nickelodeon's animated hit Dora the Explorer turns live in "Dora the Explorer Live!: Search for the City of Lost Toys," opening Wednesday at the Hippodrome. page 33 Stage The classical-music lover has almost unlimited choices this weekend -- and next week, barrier-breaking cellist Matt Haimovitz (pictured)
FEATURES
By Boston Globe | November 1, 1992
There's more than sun and sand to a Florida vacation. This season, the "crowning jewel" of Palm Beach, the Raymond F. Kravis Center for the Performing Arts, opens, and over in Fort Lauderdale, the Museum of Discovery & Science also opens.Palm Beach -- already known for its beaches, architecture and elegant shopping -- now will also feature world-class entertainment. Among artists for the first season beginning in late November will be the New York Pops, Ella Fitzgerald, Atlanta Symphony, Leontyne Price and the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater.
FEATURES
By Eileen Ogintz and Eileen Ogintz,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | June 5, 1994
"Follow us," the kids command and lead the way as we slide, crawl and climb through the small chambers of the pitch-black dome. The darkness is overpowering. My pulse is racing. We feel our way along the narrow passageways, touching who-knows-what -- a spoon here, a rubber mat there, blocks, a chain or a bicycle seat. Will we ever find the end?Finally, we slide out into the light and a vat of beans. Ten-year-old Matt and 8-year-old Reggie can't wait to start through the Tactile Dome again.
FEATURES
By David Rosenthal and David Rosenthal,Sun Staff Writer | April 23, 1995
Just a short walk from Monument Avenue, you'll find several fine museums, with exhibits ranging from the jewelry of czarist Russia to Pocahontas to a Mercury space capsule.Boulevard, which intersects with Monument Avenue at the statue of Stonewall Jackson, is a good place to start a cultural tour. It's a short walk to the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts and the Virginia Historical Society.The art museum has a wide-ranging collection, and you'll need hours to see it all. But there are some highlights that make even a short stop worthwhile.
TRAVEL
By RICHARD P. CARPENTER and RICHARD P. CARPENTER,THE BOSTON GLOBE | August 13, 2006
You may know that Philadelphia is filled with history, fine dining and plenty of culture. But you may not be aware of the city's many outdoor opportunities - among them hiking, biking, rowing, fishing, sailing, running, horseback riding and even dog walking. To acquaint visitors with the possibilities, the city has launched a $1.7 million campaign called Boundless Philadelphia, with the details at gophila.com/outdoors. Such fresh-air fun adds one more reason to visit this nearby destination, where deals are easy to come by. Here are a few: You might want to lock in a low price for the Bed, Breakfast and Prison package at the Best Western Center City Hotel.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gina Kazimir and Gina Kazimir,SUN STAFF | June 7, 2001
With all of its chic restaurants and elegant shopping, Philadelphia seems to be geared more for grown-up visitors than kids. Maybe it is, but it's also one of the most child-friendly places to visit. Philadelphia is home to a remarkable number of children's attractions, and even its most famous sites offer children's programs. If you're traveling with your family, you'll probably want to map out your visit in advance. There's a lot to see and do, so you'll want to plan carefully for a trip that won't tire everyone out. The Embassy Suites Center City (1776 Benjamin Franklin Parkway, 800-362-2779)
NEWS
By JULIE SCHARPER and JULIE SCHARPER,SUN REPORTER | June 24, 2006
Three decades ago, a group of amateur scientists came up with an idea for a new museum, one that would stand out from the harbor's industrial blight, a place where children could grab, prod and poke exhibits and occasionally be electrified by science. It was a quite a gamble for science buffs who were best known for their collection of antique telescopes. But it paid off: Today marks the 30th anniversary of their dream, the Maryland Science Center. In the past three decades, thousands of youngsters have visited the center to learn the names of the stars, to dig for fossils and to touch a charged silver ball that makes their hair stand on end. Once the lone tourist attraction on the harbor's shore, the Maryland Science Center has become a city landmark and a symbol of the transformation that turned a working port into Baltimore's Inner Harbor, a booming tourist area that pumps tens of millions of dollars into the city's coffers annually.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2004
Music Carl Thomas brings a grown-up, rich vocal sound to his sophomore album, Let's Talk About It. page 25 Eats More than 250 years after Reynolds Tavern opened in Annapolis, the building is home to Sly Fox Pub, as well as a tea room and an inn. page 20 Family Nickelodeon's animated hit Dora the Explorer turns live in "Dora the Explorer Live!: Search for the City of Lost Toys," opening Wednesday at the Hippodrome. page 33 Stage The classical-music lover has almost unlimited choices this weekend -- and next week, barrier-breaking cellist Matt Haimovitz (pictured)
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 22, 2003
LONDON - The contortionist could have looked out of place. The conspiracy theorists could have been hushed up, and the discussion of new-fashioned ways to have babies could have been held without discussing - Shhh! - sex. But not at London's newest museum. The Dana Centre has joined the home of some of the world's greatest museums, but by design it stands apart. There are no long-winded lectures, no artifacts to match The British Museum's, or more contemporary pieces to match Tate Modern's, or even the thought-provoking discoveries and mysteries housed in Britain's Science Museum.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gina Kazimir and Gina Kazimir,SUN STAFF | June 7, 2001
With all of its chic restaurants and elegant shopping, Philadelphia seems to be geared more for grown-up visitors than kids. Maybe it is, but it's also one of the most child-friendly places to visit. Philadelphia is home to a remarkable number of children's attractions, and even its most famous sites offer children's programs. If you're traveling with your family, you'll probably want to map out your visit in advance. There's a lot to see and do, so you'll want to plan carefully for a trip that won't tire everyone out. The Embassy Suites Center City (1776 Benjamin Franklin Parkway, 800-362-2779)
NEWS
By Rob Kasper and Rob Kasper,SUN STAFF | November 10, 1999
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- When Graham Banks arrived at a gala in Kansas City's refurbished Union Station last week, he immediately looked at the ceilings.Gazing at ceilings is a habit of the Portsmouth, England, native, who is general manager of the Baltimore firm Hayles & Howe, an ornamental plaster enterprise that restored the lofty reaches of grand old buildings such as Union Station.As ceilings go, Banks says, the ones in Kansas City's train station are stunners."I thought the Postal Museum was a big project," he says, referring to the ceilings of the Smithsonian's National Postal Museum in Washington.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | December 14, 1997
With some creative retooling, the Columbus Center's financially troubled Hall of Exploration still could become a successful Inner Harbor attraction, according to a panel of experts who toured the hall last month at the request of The Sun.Directors of the $147 million research center announced Friday that they are closing the public exhibition hall starting tomorrow because of financial problems. Since opening in May, the $10 million hall has failed to meet attendance projections and is being closed for an indefinite "period of re-evaluation," directors say.During a three-hour tour, the experts -- architects Peter Chermayeff and Lee Skolnick, and science museum consultant James Backstrom -- noted a variety of physical traits that they said might have kept visitors away, from an entrance partly obstructed by tall marsh grasses to a confusing interior layout.
NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN and DENNIS O'BRIEN,Dennis O'Brien is a reporter for The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 1992
There are a few images of wildlife on this earth that evoke deep feelings in us all.Wild horses roaming the American West. Polar bears and blacbears foraging in the Alaskan Wilderness. Eagles nesting on the Eastern shore.No matter how cynical we become, the thought of such animals surviving in their natural habitat seems to touch an atavistic place in our collective hearts, a reminder that we are, after all, just one species on this planet. Not the first to arrive here -- and maybe not the most important.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | December 14, 1997
With some creative retooling, the Columbus Center's financially troubled Hall of Exploration still could become a successful Inner Harbor attraction, according to a panel of experts who toured the hall last month at the request of The Sun.Directors of the $147 million research center announced Friday that they are closing the public exhibition hall starting tomorrow because of financial problems. Since opening in May, the $10 million hall has failed to meet attendance projections and is being closed for an indefinite "period of re-evaluation," directors say.During a three-hour tour, the experts -- architects Peter Chermayeff and Lee Skolnick, and science museum consultant James Backstrom -- noted a variety of physical traits that they said might have kept visitors away, from an entrance partly obstructed by tall marsh grasses to a confusing interior layout.
FEATURES
By Eileen Ogintz and Eileen Ogintz,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | January 19, 1997
The Ferrys and the Milases have two words for those planning a winter getaway with friends or family: science museum.That's right. Pack the sleeping bags, toothbrushes, a few snacks and head to a nearby science museum between your home and that of those you want to visit."
FEATURES
By David Rosenthal and David Rosenthal,Sun Staff Writer | April 23, 1995
Just a short walk from Monument Avenue, you'll find several fine museums, with exhibits ranging from the jewelry of czarist Russia to Pocahontas to a Mercury space capsule.Boulevard, which intersects with Monument Avenue at the statue of Stonewall Jackson, is a good place to start a cultural tour. It's a short walk to the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts and the Virginia Historical Society.The art museum has a wide-ranging collection, and you'll need hours to see it all. But there are some highlights that make even a short stop worthwhile.
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