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By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,SUN STAFF | February 13, 2005
Jack L. Chalker, who wrote more than 60 science-fiction and fantasy novels and was one of Maryland's most prolific authors, died of kidney failure Friday at Bon Secours Hospital in Baltimore. The Uniontown resident was 60. Mr. Chalker won numerous awards during a career that began in his early teens with a literary magazine, Mirage, that he produced on an electric mimeograph machine and assembled with friends on the dining room table of his Liberty Heights Avenue home. "He would write famous authors and see if they wanted to write free nonfiction pieces for his magazine, and a surprising number did," said his wife, Eva C. Whitley.
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By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2013
The Colonial Players troupe is opening its 65th season with an invitation for audiences to embark on an adventure of new voices and broad horizons — namely a time travel adventure written by prolific British master of farce, Alan Ayckbourn. "Communicating Doors" is a daring departure from Ayckbourn's comedy, "Taking Steps," which closed Colonial Players' previous season. The show asks us to suspend disbelief — or at least stretch it to accept what may be possible through time travel.
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NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | May 27, 2003
If you can imagine a wise and booming voice rumble these words - "In the beginning, George Lucas said, `Let there be light sabers'" - then you are on your way toward understanding what went on this weekend at Balticon 37, Maryland's regional science fiction and fantasy convention. There was myth and religion, science and culture. Weapons and jewelry, both gilded and gothic. Leather-clad ladies and long-haired gentlemen in velvet. And that was just a small galaxy in the universe of things designed to educate and entertain the folks of "fandom" - those science-fiction enthusiasts who aren't content just to read the latest fantasy novel or munch silently on popcorn while watching The Matrix: Reloaded.
FEATURES
By John-John Williams IV | September 28, 2012
Want to rub shoulders with authors from this weekend's Baltimore Book Festival ? Hotel Monaco Baltimore, 2 N. Charles St., is hosting a Mix and Mingle event, Friday from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. in the living room area of the boutique hotel. Authors include: Jennifer Armentrout (Romance), Catherine Asaro (Science Fiction), Megan Hart (Erotic Fiction), Cheryl Klam (Young Adult Romance), Sophie Perinot (Historical Fiction), Jeri Smith (Romance) and Hope Tarr (Romance).
ENTERTAINMENT
By JOE GROSSBERG and JOE GROSSBERG,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | April 9, 1998
Have you ever read a novel so engaging that you actually pictured yourself in it? Well, dress like a character in one of science fiction writer Harry Turtledove's works, and you just might win the chance to enjoy breakfast with the guest of honor at Balticon 32, one of the area's largest annual science-fiction conventions.It was over a breakfast of bacon and eggs that Turtledove came up with the idea for one of his quirkier short stories. As he recalls, "I thought, 'This tastes good. I wish to heaven it was kosher.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | July 5, 1997
William Shatner takes us where only tens of millions of viewers have gone before in "TV Guide Looks at Science Fiction" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., USA), a look at favorite science-fiction TV shows of all time. The list includes "Star Trek," "The Outer Limits," "The X-Files," "Space: 1999" and "Flash Gordon."Pub Date: 7/5/97
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | June 20, 2002
Science-fiction fans still suffer the reputation of being nerdy tech-heads with limited social skills, even though the genre is flourishing in the mainstream entertainment industry. TV shows such as The X-Files and Dark Angel have vast followings, as should the expected blockbusters Men in Black II, starring Will Smith, and Minority Report, with Tom Cruise. Granted, those who don Trekkie uniforms and attend conventions might be a little off-putting, but most sci-fi enthusiasts are regular Joes and Janes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Brad Schleicher and Brad Schleicher,Sun reporter | May 22, 2008
Celebrate your roots. That's what Balticon -- Baltimore's annual science fiction and fantasy convention -- is all about. Although technology and special effects have provided a visual manifestation of the sci-fi universe, Balticon's emphasis is on literature, the original medium that exhibited so many otherworldly characters, concepts and locations. "It's clear that we focus on the written aspect of the genre," says Gregory Wright, a Balticon chairman and coordinator. "There are numerous programs that focus on books and short stories and allow open discussion on the genre."
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA and SAM SESSA,SUN REPORTER | May 25, 2006
Balticon's heart beats for books. Every year, press and patrons like to fawn over the folks in bizarre and intricate costumes, fantasy role-playing games and movie screenings at the four-day science-fiction conference. But organizers want to remind people that Balticon started out as and remains a lit fest first. "Balticon was primarily and still is primarily a literary convention," said Dale Arnold, a Balticon organizer. "We tend to go more with literature than with film and media. Even though we do have a film festival, the primary focus is literary."
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | February 7, 1996
At 75, Ray Bradbury, the grand master of fantasy and science fiction, still starts each day with the "theater of the morning" playing in his head."I hear these voices, just when I awaken at 6 or 7 o'clock, half in and half out of sleep," he says. "I hear these voices talking, and I do what they say."He types up what his voices say on his IBM Wheelwriter, and they become short stories and novels and poems and essays.He loves his Wheelwriter because it recalls for him an old-time manual typewriter: black letters appear on white paper.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | April 2, 2012
I have a bad feeling about the remake of "Total Recall," the sci-fi thriller that was adapted from Philip K. Dick's 1966 short story "We Can Remember It for You Wholesale. " The1990 movie, which starred Arnold Schwarzenegger and Sharon Stone, was a masterpiece. (And for my money, the best thing Schwarzenegger ever made, with the possible exception of "True Lies. ") The story line hasn't changed. A factory worker, in need of a vacation, heads for a company that can implant memories in the brain.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2012
Coming unstuck in time, Pamela Regis was investigating the curious incident of the dog in the nighttime. When the clocks struck 13, she dreamt she went to ... to Manderley? — no, McDaniel. Strange as it might seem, Regis' dream of jumbled-up literary genres will come true this August. In a manner of speaking. Aided by grants totaling $200,000 from the Nora Roberts Foundation, McDaniel College in Westminster is about to launch what is possibly the nation's first academic minor in genre fiction: horror, sci-fi, romance, fantasy, mystery and Westerns, as well as graphic novels.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2011
Jonette Butler wants something understood: Balticon is not a comic book convention. "It's nothing like a comic book convention," said the chairwoman of this weekend's Balticon 45, which started Thursday and will run nearly continuously through 4 p.m. Monday at the Marriott in Hunt Valley. Pausing a moment for effect, Butler then adds mischievously, "and it's everything like a comic book convention. " What she probably means is that Balticon, like any good fan convention (be it dedicated to comic books, "Star Trek" or Civil War memorabilia)
NEWS
By Erica Fuhrmeister | May 26, 2011
As the climate continues to change as a result of human actions, the government has done little to regulate the known causes of the problem. Consider Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's recent proposal to restrict the Environmental Protection Agency from regulating greenhouse gas emissions. Such actions disregard the science behind greenhouse gases and their relation to global warming. Contrary to Senator McConnell and his ilk, we need an effective response to global warming.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2011
Angling for a larger audience with a mix of fact and fiction, Maryland-based Discovery Communications is retooling its Science Channel, changing the name and logo and doubling down on new shows with star hosts. Starting June 8, the Science Channel will drop the 'channel' and become Science. The move comes after it has recently begun airing fact-based shows ("Through the Wormhole" starring Morgan Freeman) alongside science-fiction ("Firefly") and humor ("An Idiot Abroad" with Ricky Gervais)
NEWS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2011
After working all day in their jobs with the federal government, Ann and John White don't like to come home and watch reality TV. They prefer to get immersed in something they consider more thought-provoking: science fiction. Over the weekend, the Laurel couple went to Timonium to meet with others who feel the same way at Farpoint 2011, a "fan-based" sci-fi convention at the Crowne Plaza Baltimore North hotel. "Fifty years from now, they probably aren't going to have a 'Survivor' convention or a 'Jersey Shore' convention," said Ann White.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2011
Jonette Butler wants something understood: Balticon is not a comic book convention. "It's nothing like a comic book convention," said the chairwoman of this weekend's Balticon 45, which started Thursday and will run nearly continuously through 4 p.m. Monday at the Marriott in Hunt Valley. Pausing a moment for effect, Butler then adds mischievously, "and it's everything like a comic book convention. " What she probably means is that Balticon, like any good fan convention (be it dedicated to comic books, "Star Trek" or Civil War memorabilia)
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | June 28, 2005
Barbara B. "Bobby" Gear, an English, reading and social studies teacher who was an educational activist, died of complications of pancreatic cancer Saturday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Columbia resident was 63. Born Barbara Ann Butcher in Cleveland, she earned an art history degree from Ohio State University in Columbus and a Bachelor of Education degree from the University of Maryland, College Park, where she continued to take courses. She was hired as a teacher by the Prince George's County school system in 1967 and was assigned initially to Montpelier Elementary School in Laurel.
NEWS
By Donna M. Owens | May 28, 2010
Special to The Baltimore Sun To enter a world of costumed characters, sci-fi and fantasy, there's no need to journey to a galaxy far away. The whole family can escape close to home this holiday weekend to the 44th annual Balticon convention in Hunt Valley. The four day-affair, which runs today through Monday at the Marriott Hunt Valley Inn, is expected to draw some 1,500 attendees. They're an eclectic mix: local and national authors, artists, musicians, scientists, costumers, filmmakers and fans of science fiction and other genres.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | June 19, 2009
This year's stream of escapist extravaganzas has kept crowds coming to the multiplex. But they haven't always left it happy. Watchmen disappointed Alan Moore fans and novices alike with its slavish, dated devotion to the ultimate dirty-hero graphic novel. Inkheart squandered a potential franchise for all ages about the power of reading, while the slick, empty Angels & Demons proved that Tom Hanks' haircut wasn't the only thing wrong with The Da Vinci Code. Monsters Vs. Aliens was so silly-stupid it made some of us wish we were watching a good version of a grisly film like Aliens Vs. Predators.
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