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HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2014
Countless famous footsteps have crossed the White House's entrance hall, but on Tuesday, some of the country's top science and technology dignitaries had to dodge a hovercraft made of foam and a paper bowl whizzing across the shiny pink-and-white marble. It was built by a group of five students at Patterson High School, selected among 30 research ventures for the fourth annual White House science fair. They won a place at the event by merit of a competition they won last fall, putting them in a room with President Barack Obama and with leaders of NASA, the National Science Foundation and National Institutes of Health, who visited with the students and asked questions.
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HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2014
Countless famous footsteps have crossed the White House's entrance hall, but on Tuesday, some of the country's top science and technology dignitaries had to dodge a hovercraft made of foam and a paper bowl whizzing across the shiny pink-and-white marble. It was built by a group of five students at Patterson High School, selected among 30 research ventures for the fourth annual White House science fair. They won a place at the event by merit of a competition they won last fall, putting them in a room with President Barack Obama and with leaders of NASA, the National Science Foundation and National Institutes of Health, who visited with the students and asked questions.
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NEWS
By Rosalie Falter and Rosalie Falter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 7, 1996
WELCOME, SUNDAY readers, to the Ferndale-Linthicum column. Please call me with any neighborhood news you would like to see published, 859-3569.Oyster, bull roast setThe Anne Arundel Alarmers Association's annual oyster and bull roast will be held April 14 at the Earleigh Heights Fire Hall at Ritchie Highway and Earleigh Heights Road.Atlantic Caterers will serve dinner from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Beer and dancing will be offered until 6 p.m. Music is provided by the Lasting Impressions.Tickets are $25. Call Kroger Electric Co. at 766-1416 from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., or Ruth Altvater at 761-4679, evenings.
FEATURES
By Sarai Brinker | July 24, 2013
Winner of the Editor's Choice Award from Children's Technology Review, this fun application from PBS engages young scientists with beautiful graphics and intriguing games that emphasize math and science skills. A spin-off from the hit series “Sid the Science Kid,” this app encourages your child to experiment, collect and organize data and think like a real scientist. Kids are transported to Sid's school, where there is a science fair going on. At the science fair there are three “exhibits,” interactive games with which players can engage.
NEWS
By Christy Kruhm and Christy Kruhm,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 2, 1997
In Friday's Carroll County edition, Mount Airy Elementary School student Kristen White was misidentified and fourth-grader Julie Landsman's name was misspelled in photo captions that accompanied the Southwest Neighbors column.The Sun regrets the errors.WITH THE GOAL of bringing science to a level that children can understand, Debbie McKenzie set out to organize Mount Airy Elementary School's first science fair.McKenzie achieved her goal Wednesday evening, when more than 100 students participated in the school's Family Science Fair Night.
NEWS
By Donna Abel and Donna Abel,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 7, 1999
PUPILS AT MOUNT Airy Elementary had an opportunity to show off their talents at the school's Science Fair last month.Co-chairs Valerie Gilman and Dana Buswell and hostess Tammy Lyons helped the children find tables to set up their displays and answered questions.Projects included everything from hands-on demonstrations with static electricity to displays of animals and plants, human anatomy/physiology and techniques for treating water.Those attending the event April 21 also had the opportunity to throw water balloons outside as part of one pupil's project on distance and kinetics.
NEWS
By Phyllis Lucas and Phyllis Lucas,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 6, 1997
CONGRATULATIONS to the winners of Belle Grove Elementary School's 1997 Science Fair. The kindergarten winners are: first place, Matthew Huntzberry for "The Fishing Game; second place, Steven Zogg for "Airplanes"; third place, Kelsie Lilly for "Kitchen Magic."
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Sun Staff Writer | March 22, 1994
Twelve-year-old Greg Lemich had thrown away countless used alkaline batteries from portable electronic games and stereos before he even thought of trying out the rechargeable batteries he got as a present.The problem was, the Mayfield Woods Middle School seventh-grader didn't understand how rechargeable batteries worked, and he wasn't sure whether it was worth his time to use them.But after months of research, Greg became a convert. His project, "Should I Switch to Using Rechargeable Batteries?"
NEWS
By Staff Report | March 23, 1993
A Howard County student was among the four top winners in the 38th annual Baltimore Science Fair at Towson State University this weekend.Shalin Desai of Atholton High School took first place in the high school division's physical sciences category.Shalin and James Pociluyko of Calvert Hall College in Towson will represent the area at the International Science and Engineering Fair in Mississippi Beach, Miss., in May.In the middle school division, the first-place winners are: Justin Hlavin of Cockeysville Middle School, biological sciences; and Patrick Venanzi of Dumbarton Middle School in Rodgers Forge, physical sciences.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | April 28, 1994
Alexander Graham Bell, one version of the story goes, invented the telephone while trying to create something that would help his sainted mother, who was losing her hearing.But the truth of it is, she was trying to help him do a project for the science fair and she discovered the telephone.It is spring, and it is science fair season. In an example of very poor scheduling, schools everywhere are asking parents and their children to cooperate on a complex educational project at just the moment when the weather changes and the kids want to ride their bikes and the parents want to get their yard work done.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2012
North County High School freshman Jack Andraka stood on the auditorium stage, speaking about the invention that earned him the $75,000 grand prize at the recent Intel International Science and Engineering Fair. Behind him stood Dr. Anirban Maitra, a professor in the Johns Hopkins University's department of pathology who gave Jack use of his lab to craft his invention, a cheap and effective "dipstick-sensor" method of testing blood or urine to identify early-stage pancreatic cancer and other diseases.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2011
Christopher Briggs' science project grew out of his grandparents' love of watching birds at their feeders. "I kind of wanted to help them out," said the Sacred Heart School sixth-grader from Reisterstown. "I wanted to find out if the looks of the bird feeder affected how many birds were attracted to it. " So, Christopher, 12, applied the scientific method. And the results of his experiments with feeders — identical except for their colors — were presented Sunday at the 56th Baltimore Science Fair, at Towson University.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2011
Grand Prize Winners in the 2011 Baltimore Science Fair These high school students will represent the Greater Baltimore region in the Intel International Science & Engineering Fair, May 8-13 in Los Angeles. Students win a $200 cash prize and all-expenses paid trip to the competition. Physical Science: Michael Tontchev, Ingenuity Project, Polytechnic Institute. "Subject identification in a sentence using plain context-free grammars. " Biological Science: Jai Thakor, River Hill High School.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | May 31, 2009
The scientists of tomorrow, most of them young girls, made sturdy towers from newspaper, wore cardboard DNA strands in their hair and built toothbrush robots. "It really shows you can put a motor on anything," said Ainsley Sierzega, 12, of Williamsport, watching her brush race across the floor. Music blared in the background at the Sally Ride Science Festival, which traveled to Towson University for the third consecutive year Saturday. A few danced but most of the 500 participants focused on the latest scientific techniques for tie-dying T-shirts, mixing slime and building a matrix.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,john-john.williams@baltsun.com | April 19, 2009
Emily Schultheis never imagined that her love of tomatoes would translate into success in science. But that's what happened when her parents challenged her to explore a way to make it easier to pick her favorite fruit. "Ever since I was little, I liked to eat tomatoes," the 15-year-old sophomore at Glenelg High School said. "It was more fun to eat them than to pick them." Two years ago, Schultheis began working on a way to pick tomatoes using robotics. Her research has evolved into the award-winning project with a tongue-twister of a title: "Optical Feedback Improves the Accuracy of an Autonomous Robotic Arm That Will Pick Ripe Tomatoes."
NEWS
By Paul Spause | August 11, 2008
The U.S. government does not have the authority to dictate what a student studies. Any federal education law that dictates curricula, no matter what its intent, will have the double dishonor of being unconstitutional and a failure. Problems with math and science education are neither a lack of availability nor a lack of requirement; local school districts require more math and science education in earlier grades than ever before. Teryn Norris and Jesse Jenkins of Breakthrough Generation wrote on this page recently that a federal National Energy Education Act is needed to promote education in math and science to modernize our energy infrastructure.
NEWS
By Christy Kruhm and Christy Kruhm,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 16, 2001
HAVE YOU EVER wondered how well people wash their hands? Can hamsters learn? Is it possible for bubbles to propel rockets through the air? These and other intriguing questions were put to the test by Mount Airy Elementary pupils during the school's science fair Feb. 9. In its fifth year, the science fair strives to maintain the original goal of previous chairwoman and event creator, Debbie McKenzie. She set out to design a fair that would bring science to a level that children can understand.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | May 22, 1997
Sabyasachi Guharay was one of the top finishers last week at the prestigious International Science and Engineering Fair in Louisville, Ky.The 17-year-old junior at Columbia's Wilde Lake High School -- who won a grand prize at the Baltimore Regional Science Fair in March -- won the fourth grand prize in computer science at the international competition for his work studying patterns in genetic sequences."
NEWS
By LIZ F. KAY and LIZ F. KAY,SUN REPORTER | May 1, 2006
Do relatives have similar fingerprints? Do bananas turn brown more quickly in the refrigerator or on the counter? How does wearing shoes on the incorrect feet affect your speed? At Seventh District Elementary School last week, kids asked the darndest questions - and systematically found some answers. In Baltimore County, this is the season for the school science fair, a ritual that gets kids pondering the wonders of their universe. From physics to chemistry, from measuring a ball's bounce to putting paper towels to the test.
NEWS
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 26, 2006
Danna Thomas, the grand-prize winner of the Anne Arundel County Regional Science Fair, is fascinated by radiation. This is a phenomenon, she points out, that can cure cancer, but also cause it. Danna, 16, a junior at Broadneck High School, hopes to be an oncologist, though she's not sure yet if she wants to focus on research or treatment. Meanwhile, she's been busy studying the effects of radiation on cells. Last year, that interest earned her second prize in the county's regional science fair.
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