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By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | March 17, 1998
Robert F. Frantz, a teacher in Baltimore for nearly 40 years, died of heart failure Friday while visiting relatives in Atlanta. He was 70.A resident of Hamilton in Northeast Baltimore, he taught history and science, and was chairman of the science department at several schools in a teaching career that began in 1952 and ended in 1989."
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2014
A rocket carrying 3,000 pounds of supplies for the International Space Station is scheduled to launch Friday afternoon, and should be visible across the mid-Atlantic. Orbital Sciences Corp. is slated to launch a Cygnus cargo spacecraft at 1:40 p.m. from NASA's Wallops Space Flight Facility on the Virginia portion of the Delmarva peninsula. Aboard the Antares rocket's payload will be provisions, spare parts and equipment for science experiments. One experiment on board involves deploying a flock of "nanosatellites" designed to take images of Earth, while others were designed through the Student Spaceflight Experiment Program, according to NASA.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | July 18, 2002
Call it a kids' paradise. With more activities, games, sports and entertainment than your kid could ever possibly handle, "Kids Fest 3" at the Maryland State Fairgrounds Saturday is indeed a kids' utopia. Kids can get physical with carnival games and rides, a 24-foot climbing wall, football-toss, speed-pitch, sandbox, pony rides, jewelry-making, interactive new video games and more. Or they can sit back and watch performances by Bob the Vid-Tech, the Company Elite Dance Studio, a bicycle stunt team and various musicians.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Amy Watts, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2013
Mirrorball Madness is back, baby! They waste no time going straight to the competitive routines after a brief welcome from Tom and Brooke following the opening number.   Brant Daugherty  & Peta Murgatroyd Cha cha Brant describes himself as a "single threat" because he can't sing or dance. Who knew he could be pretty AND funny? They appear to be dancing to the recorded version of "Blurred Lines. "  WHAT HAVE THEY DONE WITH HAROLD WHEELER? ACK. They've moved the judges' stand to the opposite of the dance floor.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Sun Staff Writer | April 9, 1995
At Christ United Methodist Church in East Baltimore nearly 30 children are dropping by on Saturdays not to learn more about God, but to learn how science touches their everyday lives.The children do simple chemistry experiments, such as testing acids and bases using red cabbage and bicarbonate of soda, and making a plastic-like substance from heavy cream and vinegar.Under a program coordinated by Baltimore City Community College and the Christopher Columbus Center, 11 city churches provide field trips and hands-on science experiments to youngsters ages 7 to 12.Called "Science is For Everyone," the 2-year-old program aims to encourage children to participate in math and science activities.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2014
A rocket carrying 3,000 pounds of supplies for the International Space Station is scheduled to launch Friday afternoon, and should be visible across the mid-Atlantic. Orbital Sciences Corp. is slated to launch a Cygnus cargo spacecraft at 1:40 p.m. from NASA's Wallops Space Flight Facility on the Virginia portion of the Delmarva peninsula. Aboard the Antares rocket's payload will be provisions, spare parts and equipment for science experiments. One experiment on board involves deploying a flock of "nanosatellites" designed to take images of Earth, while others were designed through the Student Spaceflight Experiment Program, according to NASA.
NEWS
By Brian Gaines | January 22, 2013
This month Marylanders learned that Education Week had named our state's schools the best in the nation for the fifth year in a row. Credit goes to our students, educators, parents and policy makers for this exciting recognition. But as CEO of a nonprofit dedicated to science education, I would caution against excess celebration. A closer look at recent test scores reveals that we must improve how we educate our students in science, a discipline that is vital to success in the 21st century economy.
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 10, 2002
AS JOB coordinator for the Foreign-born Information and Referral Network (FIRN), Alma Leibowitz often has clients who need assistance putting together an appropriate wardrobe for job interviews but who lack the funds to purchase new clothes, shoes and accessories. That's when Jeannette Kendall - founder of Success In Style - comes to the rescue. Launched in August, Success In Style is a nonprofit organization that provides low-income women with clothing and accessories to help them pursue employment.
NEWS
By Keisha Reynolds and Keisha Reynolds,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 15, 2000
Principal Steven Meconi, dressed in an astronaut's uniform, climbed onto the roof of Northfield Elementary School. In his hands was the official "Star Gazer Night" flag, with the title words of Friday night's astronomy show embroidered on it. The flag was symbolic of the PTA's and administration's desire to spur excitement about math and science deep into the minds of about 640 schoolchildren. His antics that morning at the Ellicott City school were representative of one small step for the community's adults and one large step for its children.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and By Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | October 17, 2001
The man from NASA held the half-moon-shaped, black aluminum space capsule in his yellow plastic gloves and said to the young children: "This hasn't seen daylight since May. It's seen lots of radiation, hot and cold, microbes, all sorts of stuff." Now, he asked, who wants to open it? Thirty hands shot into the air. Sixty eyes trained on the capsule and waited for the unveiling. Inside were experiments from five Anne Arundel County elementary schools. The capsule, packed in May, was shot into space in August aboard the shuttle Discovery.
NEWS
By Brian Gaines | January 22, 2013
This month Marylanders learned that Education Week had named our state's schools the best in the nation for the fifth year in a row. Credit goes to our students, educators, parents and policy makers for this exciting recognition. But as CEO of a nonprofit dedicated to science education, I would caution against excess celebration. A closer look at recent test scores reveals that we must improve how we educate our students in science, a discipline that is vital to success in the 21st century economy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | July 18, 2002
Call it a kids' paradise. With more activities, games, sports and entertainment than your kid could ever possibly handle, "Kids Fest 3" at the Maryland State Fairgrounds Saturday is indeed a kids' utopia. Kids can get physical with carnival games and rides, a 24-foot climbing wall, football-toss, speed-pitch, sandbox, pony rides, jewelry-making, interactive new video games and more. Or they can sit back and watch performances by Bob the Vid-Tech, the Company Elite Dance Studio, a bicycle stunt team and various musicians.
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 10, 2002
AS JOB coordinator for the Foreign-born Information and Referral Network (FIRN), Alma Leibowitz often has clients who need assistance putting together an appropriate wardrobe for job interviews but who lack the funds to purchase new clothes, shoes and accessories. That's when Jeannette Kendall - founder of Success In Style - comes to the rescue. Launched in August, Success In Style is a nonprofit organization that provides low-income women with clothing and accessories to help them pursue employment.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and By Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | October 17, 2001
The man from NASA held the half-moon-shaped, black aluminum space capsule in his yellow plastic gloves and said to the young children: "This hasn't seen daylight since May. It's seen lots of radiation, hot and cold, microbes, all sorts of stuff." Now, he asked, who wants to open it? Thirty hands shot into the air. Sixty eyes trained on the capsule and waited for the unveiling. Inside were experiments from five Anne Arundel County elementary schools. The capsule, packed in May, was shot into space in August aboard the shuttle Discovery.
NEWS
By Keisha Reynolds and Keisha Reynolds,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 15, 2000
Principal Steven Meconi, dressed in an astronaut's uniform, climbed onto the roof of Northfield Elementary School. In his hands was the official "Star Gazer Night" flag, with the title words of Friday night's astronomy show embroidered on it. The flag was symbolic of the PTA's and administration's desire to spur excitement about math and science deep into the minds of about 640 schoolchildren. His antics that morning at the Ellicott City school were representative of one small step for the community's adults and one large step for its children.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | September 13, 1998
The what-I-did-on-my-summer-vacation talks at Towson University yesterday were not of the usual beach-and-boardwalk variety.Try "Effects of Ailanthus Altissima on Soil Respiration." Or "Effects of Interleukin-1 Receptor Antagonist in a Rabbit Model of Diarrheal Disease Due to Shiga-toxin Producing Escherichia coli."The speakers were elementary and middle school teachers and teachers-to-be who had participated in a summer-intern program designed to give them experience in the sciences. Yesterday was report day."
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | September 13, 1998
The what-I-did-on-my-summer-vacation talks at Towson University yesterday were not of the usual beach-and-boardwalk variety.Try "Effects of Ailanthus Altissima on Soil Respiration." Or "Effects of Interleukin-1 Receptor Antagonist in a Rabbit Model of Diarrheal Disease Due to Shiga-toxin Producing Escherichia coli."The speakers were elementary and middle school teachers and teachers-to-be who had participated in a summer-intern program designed to give them experience in the sciences. Yesterday was report day."
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | March 17, 1998
Robert F. Frantz, a teacher in Baltimore for nearly 40 years, died of heart failure Friday while visiting relatives in Atlanta. He was 70.A resident of Hamilton in Northeast Baltimore, he taught history and science, and was chairman of the science department at several schools in a teaching career that began in 1952 and ended in 1989."
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