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By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | March 9, 2011
When Hank Zwally wants to do a science experiment, he climbs through a hole in his bedroom closet into an unfinished attic room where the high school senior has constructed an elaborate 10-by-12-foot cube of blue insulation. Beside the holiday decorations and the ski equipment, Zwally is trying to test a theory about global warming. When he enters the cube, the Eagle Scout can open a freezer where he is measuring the freezing and thawing cycles of sea water in two large tanks. Zwally is a science whiz, a Centennial High School senior driven since youth to solve problems in biology.
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NEWS
By Matthew Bobrowsky | September 26, 2014
Now that Congress is back from its summer recess, members are considering a number of appropriation bills. Priorities are being weighed, and I hope - given our increasingly technological society - scientific research and science education are high on the list. The development of innovations and new products, particularly in medicine and electronics, depends heavily on scientific research. Besides expanding the sum of human knowledge, federally funded scientific research grows our economy and improves the quality of life for all Americans.
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NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2011
The eight handmade race cars that successfully zoomed down the 5-foot wooden ramp in the hallway at Sarah M. Roach Elementary on Friday not only highlighted the work of a diligent group of Baltimore third-graders, but marked the beginning of a revved-up effort by the city school system to get a long-derailed academic program back on track. Students at the school celebrated the culmination of a four-week science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) summer program by showcasing their projects, which included race cars made of recyclables, wind turbines powered by generators and boats that clean up oil spills.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2014
Professor James Gates delivers his big ideas in analogies and metaphors. Setting lax standards for schoolchildren in science classes is like teaching them to dunk a basketball on a 9-foot-high hoop, when kids the next town over play with one 10 feet high, the state school board member says. Without diversity of thought and perspective among collaborating scientists, you get nothing but classical music, the physicist argues. "When you let different people create different music, you get things like rock 'n' roll, jazz," Gates said.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2011
Maryland has joined a multi-state campaign to improve science education — a move that will lead to a greater emphasis on analytical and conceptual thinking. As part of the 20-state effort led by the National Academy of Sciences, Maryland will help write new standards that determine what is taught in schools from kindergarten through high school. The new science teaching will encourage students to examine concepts that cross the boundaries of physics, biology and chemistry, said Stephen Pruitt, vice president of content, research and development at Achieve, a nonpartisan, nonprofit that is coordinating the effort.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2013
Students across Maryland would see revamped science classes under curriculum standards the state school board will consider Tuesday - part of a broader effort by educators, researchers and businesses to kindle innovation in children well before they enter the workforce. The proposal seeks to turn school science into a reflection of real science by emphasizing the process of discovery and encouraging students to ask questions, rather than requiring them to memorize facts. Maryland was one of 26 states that helped several science and education groups write the standards.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 30, 2004
ATLANTA - Georgia students could graduate from high school without learning much about evolution, and may never even hear the word in class. New middle and high school science standards proposed by state Schools Superintendent Kathy Cox strike references to "evolution" and replace them with the term "biological changes over time," a revision critics say will further weaken learning in a critical subject. Outraged teachers have told the state it is undercutting the science education of young Georgians.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2011
Students at Parkville Middle School & Center of Technology have lots of high-tech equipment at their disposal — laptops on which they can make educational videos, for example, and labs in which to study hydraulics and aeronautics. But for this particular project, they used lower-tech materials such as crumpled aluminum foil, powdered drink mix, soil, water and a baking pan to show how pesticides, construction dirt and rain can run off to pollute the Chesapeake Bay watershed. "That's nasty," their visitor said Monday morning of the resulting orange-tinted sludge.
NEWS
By RICHARD SIMON and RICHARD SIMON,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 13, 2006
WASHINGTON -- A year ago, when President Bush's domestic priority was to restructure the Social Security program, the proposal sank amid partisan dispute. Now Bush has all but abandoned his Social Security overhaul in favor of a much less ambitious plan. His "American competitiveness initiative," designed to prevent the United States from falling behind its economic competitors in Asia and elsewhere, would provide federal support for math and science education, and basic research in the physical sciences.
NEWS
By Nancy S. Grasmick | March 14, 2011
Science education in the U.S. faces many challenges. Our national school reform effort, crystallized in No Child Left Behind in 2002, concentrated first on mathematics and language arts. Science has not been emphasized in our teacher preparation programs. Building state-of-the art science labs for middle and high school students is expensive. Our state has recognized the importance of improved science education, and has been working to strengthen instruction for the past several years.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2013
Maryland became the fourth state in the nation Tuesday to adopt new science standards that will require teachers to emphasize the process of doing science rather than memorizing facts, a move designed to get more children interested in science and science careers. A revamped science curriculum must be taught in classrooms beginning in the fall of 2017, but school systems around the state can choose to put it in place earlier. Tests linked to the new curriculum will be given in the spring of 2018 and will replace the current science tests.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2013
Students across Maryland would see revamped science classes under curriculum standards the state school board will consider Tuesday - part of a broader effort by educators, researchers and businesses to kindle innovation in children well before they enter the workforce. The proposal seeks to turn school science into a reflection of real science by emphasizing the process of discovery and encouraging students to ask questions, rather than requiring them to memorize facts. Maryland was one of 26 states that helped several science and education groups write the standards.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin, For The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2013
These days, libraries offer much more than books. Most people know they can check out videos, music, video games, books on tape and toys. But in the Harford County Public Library system, patrons can also check out educational kits, filled with games, toys, suggested activities and sometimes even costumes. The library has been offering kits in one form or another for decades, said Melissa Harrah, the system's Learning and Sharing Collection librarian. The first ones, still in circulation, were created to help children go through scary experiences or life transitions, such as getting a new sister or brother, or having surgery.
EXPLORE
By Janene Holzberg | March 21, 2013
When Debra Buczkowski was 7, in 1976, NASA's Viking space probes were landing on Mars and sending images of the red planet back to Earth as part of their $1 billion mission. “I realized that no matter where I went on this planet, I couldn't pick up anything in those photos,” the New York native says, recalling how that mesmerized her. Her early appreciation for the wonders of astronomy led to a career mapping structures on other rocky bodies like Earth, such as Mercury and Mars, as opposed to the gas giants, like Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune, she says.
NEWS
By Brian Gaines | January 22, 2013
This month Marylanders learned that Education Week had named our state's schools the best in the nation for the fifth year in a row. Credit goes to our students, educators, parents and policy makers for this exciting recognition. But as CEO of a nonprofit dedicated to science education, I would caution against excess celebration. A closer look at recent test scores reveals that we must improve how we educate our students in science, a discipline that is vital to success in the 21st century economy.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2012
Teachers in Maryland are about to get new help and encouragement to talk about the touchy topic of global warming in their classrooms. The National Science Foundation announced Wednesday that it is awarding $5.8 million for improving climate-change education in Maryland and Delaware through a partnership including universities and school systems from both states. The two-state initiative is one of six such education projects the foundation is funding across the country and in the nation's Pacific island territories.
NEWS
November 2, 1992
Russell A. Poch, professor of physical science at Howard Community College, is the 1992 winner of the Maryland Association of Science Teachers (MAST) Award for Excellence in College Science Education.Professor Poch was selected because of his leadership in science education, service to students and colleagues, commitment to personal growth and contributions to improvements in science education.For the past three years he has taught elementary science teachers in a summer grant program funded by the Maryland Higher Education Commission.
NEWS
March 10, 2011
There are so many things that Maryland schools can do to make the science education better and easer for students ("Deficient in science," March 10).They could do more hands-on experiments and research at an earlier age. They could get a science specialist teacher in the schools, more lab work and help with studying. Plus, they just need to make it more fun then everyone would want to learn about science. Pedro Santana
HEALTH
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | August 10, 2012
Gaming is hot right now — even in the lab-coat world of science education. The MdBio Foundation, a private charitable organization for promoting science learning and workforce development, is building an online video game for high school students. They plan to build a half-dozen games that can reach millions of students across the state and the country. The group sees science-based video games as a way to help improve education in the STEM fields, or science, technology, engineering and mathematics.
NEWS
April 1, 2012
The article "Conservatives confidence in science declines" (March 30) describes how better educated conservatives' confidence in science and in the reality of climate change has declined precipitously in recent years. This confirms what I have long maintained, that education by itself is no assurance of intelligence or knowledge. I guess we now need a new category - the stupid educated class. Jack Kinstlinger, Baltimore
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