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By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | January 9, 1995
The same whiz-bang computer magic that has compressed encyclopedias onto CD-ROM disks is about to be applied to the dusty rituals of browsing library shelves and reading jacket flaps.An interactive program that will allow teachers, parents and youngsters to quickly find just the right children's science books among 3,000 recent titles is under development at the University of Maryland Baltimore County."It's work that would take hours, and we can do it at lightning speed," said Dr. Wendy Saul, an associate professor of education at UMBC.
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | January 9, 1995
The same whiz-bang computer magic that has compressed encyclopedias onto CD-ROM disks is about to be applied to the dusty rituals of browsing library shelves and reading jacket flaps.An interactive program that will allow teachers, parents and youngsters to quickly find just the right children's science books among 3,000 recent titles is under development at the University of Maryland Baltimore County."It's work that would take hours, and we can do it at lightning speed," said Dr. Wendy Saul, an associate professor of education at UMBC.
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | January 9, 1995
The same whiz-bang computer magic that has compressed encyclopedias onto CD-ROM disks is about to be applied to the dusty rituals of browsing library shelves and reading jacket flaps.An interactive program that will allow teachers, parents and youngsters to quickly find just the right children's science books among 3,000 recent titles is under development at the University of Maryland Baltimore County."It's work that would take hours, and we can do it at lightning speed," said Wendy Saul, an associate professor of education at UMBC.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | January 9, 1995
The same whiz-bang computer magic that has compressed encyclopedias onto CD-ROM disks is about to be applied to the dusty rituals of browsing library shelves and reading jacket flaps.An interactive program that will allow teachers, parents and youngsters to quickly find just the right children's science books among 3,000 recent titles is under development at the University of Maryland Baltimore County."It's work that would take hours, and we can do it at lightning speed," said Wendy Saul, an associate professor of education at UMBC.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Staff Writer | January 3, 1993
Anthropologist Wilbur Norman's field is just about anywhereToday's multiple choice quiz . . . Wilbur L. Norman is:(A) A rare book dealer,(B) A pawn shop broker,(C) A scholar gone awry.Try all of the above. But whether he's buying a book by Sir Isaac Newton, inspecting a used VCR or reminiscing about his research in East Africa, the end is the same: seeing humanity, up close and personal."Anthropologists," he says, "can do people-watching in any kind of sphere."After getting his Ph.D and studying overseas, he left the field to fulfill a lifelong dream: owning a book store.
NEWS
By Dolly Merritt | November 3, 1991
Alan Kramer is the master of fizz and pop.He knows what happens when you take a jar and add a little bit of vinegar, warm water and baking soda: a volcano-like eruption that foams and sputters out of its container."
NEWS
July 5, 1995
Bruce Hlibok, 34, a deaf actor who played on Broadway, died June 23 of pneumonia at his home in Jersey City, N.J. He wrote several plays that ran off-Broadway, including "Going Home" in 1980, "WomanTalk" in 1984 and "The Deaf Mute Howls" in 1988. He gained notice in 1978 when he portrayed one of the children from broken homes in the Joseph Papp production of the Elizabeth Swados play "Runaways."Frederick M. Supper, 78, former chairman and owner of Alexander Proudfoot Co., a management consulting firm in West Palm Beach, Fla., died of complications from emphysema Sunday at his home in Palm Beach.
NEWS
By Omar Tyree | October 13, 1996
"The Island of Dr. Moreau," by H.G. Wells. After seeing the movie, I was so angry I had to read the book again. [In the current movie version] so much of the storyline was lost. Being an author, I would rather see a movie with an interesting storyline than one with tons of special effects. In this case, the book is much, much better. I'm also reading "Patternmaster," by Octavia Butler. She's one of my favorite authors - her "Wildseed" is probably my favorite book. She writes black science fiction, that's science fiction with black characters.
NEWS
August 29, 2005
Gray Johnson Poole, a journalist and author of books for youth, died Aug. 21 of natural causes at the Kensington Episcopal Home in Alhambra, Calif., where she lived. She was 98. Born Elizabeth Gray Johnson in Pennsylvania, Mrs. Poole preferred to use her middle name. She attended the Johns Hopkins University for three years before leaving school to care for her ailing father. Mrs. Poole was a writer since childhood and published her first short story when she was 11. In the 1930s and 1940s, Mrs. Poole was a reporter and society editor for The Evening Sun. In 1941, she married Lynn Poole, who served as Johns Hopkins' first director of public relations from 1946 to 1966 and developed one of television's first educational programs.
NEWS
By Jennifer Vick and Jennifer Vick,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | March 3, 1997
A pair of computer-animated, wandering eyes encourages young readers to look at Mona Kerby's Web site, "The Author Corner: Mid-Atlantic Authors."The site introduces middle school students to mid-Atlantic authors and illustrators of children's books. Kerby, an assistant professor of library science at Western Maryland College, is among them."I did this for the sheer love of it. When you've been a teacher for so long, you're always looking for ways to make students read," said Kerby, a teacher at Western Maryland College for three years.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Staff Writer | January 3, 1993
Anthropologist Wilbur Norman's field is just about anywhereToday's multiple choice quiz . . . Wilbur L. Norman is:(A) A rare book dealer,(B) A pawn shop broker,(C) A scholar gone awry.Try all of the above. But whether he's buying a book by Sir Isaac Newton, inspecting a used VCR or reminiscing about his research in East Africa, the end is the same: seeing humanity, up close and personal."Anthropologists," he says, "can do people-watching in any kind of sphere."After getting his Ph.D and studying overseas, he left the field to fulfill a lifelong dream: owning a book store.
NEWS
By Dolly Merritt | November 3, 1991
Alan Kramer is the master of fizz and pop.He knows what happens when you take a jar and add a little bit of vinegar, warm water and baking soda: a volcano-like eruption that foams and sputters out of its container."
NEWS
February 27, 1999
WHAT IF physicians had ignored death rates that suggested bloodletting wasn't such a great cure? What if mapmakers kissed off sailors' stories that disproved the Earth is flat? What if astronomers had evidence that Pluto isn't really a planet but decided to keep calling it one anyway? Hold it, that's where we are.The International Astronomical Union says it will continue to list Pluto as our solar system's ninth planet even if it doesn't measure up. The IAU has gone medieval by placing tradition over science.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | March 17, 1998
Robert F. Frantz, a teacher in Baltimore for nearly 40 years, died of heart failure Friday while visiting relatives in Atlanta. He was 70.A resident of Hamilton in Northeast Baltimore, he taught history and science, and was chairman of the science department at several schools in a teaching career that began in 1952 and ended in 1989."
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