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NEWS
May 22, 1994
There is a direct relationship between America's crumbling competitive position in the world marketplace and the pervasive weakness of students in science and mathematics. The problem is not exclusive to urban public schools; it extends to private and suburban schools as well. But it is in the cities where scientifically and mathematically illiterate students are concentrated.This means, of course, that blacks and Hispanics have the worst achievement levels. It means, too, that too many of these students leave the academic pipeline because of failure or lack of interest.
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By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2013
The LGBT community at Johns Hopkins University seems to be getting more organized by the minute. Since the spring, three new efforts to connect lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender students and community members have launched -- one led by university students, one by university alumni and one by the university itself. "It's the outcome of a lot of work from a lot of people," said Demere Woolway, 30, hired in July to be the first director of the university's new LGBTQ Life program . "There's sort of a confluence of things.
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NEWS
By Madison Park and Madison Park,Sun Reporter | May 27, 2007
Like many other 16-year-olds, Michelle Guignet enjoys pop music, dancing and soccer. She also enjoys organic chemistry. Her eyes widen as she talks about the titration lab in her Advanced Placement chemistry class. And the high school junior doesn't care how nerdy that sounds. Guignet attends the Science and Math Academy, a Harford County public schools magnet program. In the three years since the high school academy opened, each class has had nearly equal number of boys and girls. "It's not a coincidence," said Donna Clem, the program coordinator.
NEWS
September 7, 2012
I was encouraged by Mike McGrew's recent commentary about the value of arts education, a topic that is close to my heart ("The value of arts in education," Sept. 5). It reminds me of a three-year stint I did at Glenmount Elementary School in Northeast Baltimore in the late 1990s as an arts specialist. At the time, I was a folk musician specializing in culturally diverse children's music, dance and singing games. Due to the tremendous insight of then-Principal Vera Newton, I was brought on part-time to help augment the K-4 curriculum using the arts (drama, music and folk arts/literature)
BUSINESS
By Jon Van and Jon Van,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 17, 2005
Taking a step toward halting the decline of America's leadership in technology, International Business Machines Corp. said yesterday that it will help its veteran employees launch new careers teaching math and science. IBM will give the employees salaries and benefits while they take necessary courses to become teachers. It will also pay tuition costs up to $15,000. The effort will begin in January with a pilot program in New York and North Carolina that will include up to 100 IBM employees.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | December 5, 1999
SUGAR AND SPICE and everything nice. They read better, too.If you look at the seven-year record of the Maryland School Performance Assessment Program (MSPAP), you'll see that girls have consistently outpaced boys in all six subjects tested.But here's an interesting distinction: The male-female gap is much wider in reading and writing than it is in math and science. This year, Maryland's third-grade girls scored 8.6 percentage points higher in reading than third-grade boys, and the gap in writing was nearly 11 percentage points.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | February 6, 1992
The wonderful lost city of Ubar has been found, but don't everybody move there at once.They want to build a Giant in a park, for the folks who play ball in the supermarket.Congress is very good about extending jobless benefits, as if that is all it can do.Syria is buying up surplus Czech and Soviet tanks. To make peace with?Never ride a motorcycle without a helmet, or serve in the legislature without thick skin.Cheer up. American 13-year-olds score higher in science and math than Irish and Jordanian 13-year-olds.
NEWS
March 16, 2011
Like so many other articles in recent months, Nancy Grasmick's opinion piece that appeared in The Sun on March 14 emphasized the most recent buzz term in education, STEM ( "Maryland: The state of science" . Her statement, "Our nation has ignored science and math education for far too long," rang painfully true to me as a parent. When my daughter entered the Baltimore County school system as a kindergartner in 2006, at what was touted as one of the county's top schools, complete with excellent Maryland standardized test scores, I expected something more academically.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | December 9, 2001
THE FIRST major international study of reading in a decade shows that American 15-year-olds are about as proficient at reading as they are at mathematics and science. They're adequate but not very good - the definition of mediocre. In a new test given last year, U.S. teens performed about in the middle of the pack of 15-year-olds from 27 countries, most of them industrialized. Teen-agers in Canada, Finland and New Zealand significantly outperformed them. American students substantially outshone peers in only seven countries, among them Mexico.
NEWS
March 6, 1991
Business administration, which was not among the top five choices ofcounty residents asked about their higher education plans in 1985, surged to the top of the list in a 1990 Howard Community College survey.The random telephone survey asked 400 county residents age 16 and older what and where they wanted to study and what services were needed to allow them to continue their education beyond high school.The survey did not ask residents the reasons for their choices.John Bouman, associate professor of business and economics at HCC, says he hasn't done a formal study, but he is seeing more interest among students in programs that allow them to transfer to four-year colleges and less interest in traditional two-year programs.
NEWS
August 6, 2012
They called it the "seven minutes or terror" for the complex maneuverings and rocket blasts conducted in the final moments of a 354 million mile journey from home, but the Curiosity rover executed its landing flawlessly. Those who doubted U.S. preeminence in space exploration — or even in science and engineering in an era of outsourcing and global competition — should pay heed. Too bad there was no film crew on the surface of Mars (at least as far as we distant earthlings can tell)
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2011
Students at Howard County's Summer Initiatives for Talent Development program think kids shouldn't spend their summers watching television or hanging out with friends when they can extract DNA from fruits and vegetables or debate whether schoolchildren should get paid for good grades. "I thought it would be fun to get an education during the summer," said Cambria Miles, a rising sixth-grader at Murray Hill Middle School in Laurel and one of more than 400 students taking part in the summer program where students engage in courses and activities that cultivate their interests and expand what they've learned during the school year.
NEWS
March 16, 2011
Like so many other articles in recent months, Nancy Grasmick's opinion piece that appeared in The Sun on March 14 emphasized the most recent buzz term in education, STEM ( "Maryland: The state of science" . Her statement, "Our nation has ignored science and math education for far too long," rang painfully true to me as a parent. When my daughter entered the Baltimore County school system as a kindergartner in 2006, at what was touted as one of the county's top schools, complete with excellent Maryland standardized test scores, I expected something more academically.
NEWS
By Jackelyn Lopez | August 16, 2009
Last week, I was in Annapolis when Governor O'Malley received a task force report on the shortage of skilled science and math teachers. The recommendation of the report is to improve education and increase the state's technological workforce in order to stimulate economic growth. This will be beneficial to Maryland's future, and the report's goals are personally encouraging, as they relate directly to my own. This past spring, my goals changed. I was finishing my fourth year of mechanical engineering at the University of Maryland and all of my friends were getting excited about graduation.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Sun | April 20, 2008
A former private investigator, accountant and a sign language instructor are among the 10 finalists for Harford County Teacher of the Year. The finalists who were selected by a panel of educators and community members will be honored at the 14th annual Teacher of the Year banquet Thursday at the Bayou Restaurant in Havre de Grace. Dr. Jon Andes, superintendent of Worcester County Public Schools, will be the speaker and Michelle Sledge, a jazz vocalist, and the Bel Air Pop Choir will perform.
NEWS
By Madison Park and Madison Park,Sun Reporter | May 27, 2007
Like many other 16-year-olds, Michelle Guignet enjoys pop music, dancing and soccer. She also enjoys organic chemistry. Her eyes widen as she talks about the titration lab in her Advanced Placement chemistry class. And the high school junior doesn't care how nerdy that sounds. Guignet attends the Science and Math Academy, a Harford County public schools magnet program. In the three years since the high school academy opened, each class has had nearly equal number of boys and girls. "It's not a coincidence," said Donna Clem, the program coordinator.
NEWS
September 29, 1991
Howard County can claim an elementary and high school teacher among the 216 nationwide recipients of the 1991 Presidential Award for Excellence in Science and Mathematics teaching.Carol Cobb, a science teacher at Elkridge Elementary School, will be recognized during ceremonies in Washington this week.The events include an awards presentation at the Carnegie Institution of Washington, plus a reception at the Air and Space Museum and dinners at the Department of State and the National Press Club.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | September 29, 2001
Linda Jarvis Eberhart, a teacher at Baltimore's Mount Royal Elementary/Middle School, was named Maryland Teacher of the Year yesterday during a ceremony at Martin's West. Selected from a field of seven finalists, Eberhart was recognized for her work teaching science and math to fourth- and fifth-graders. Her efforts helped the school post the highest math scores on the Maryland School Performance Assessment Program the past two years. "At Mount Royal, we eliminated the race and income achievement gap," Eberhart said yesterday after being honored.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to the Sun | October 1, 2006
Ruth Eisenhour opened the padlock on the top of a wooden structure, swiped away some ants on its ledge and slid down into the crate-like contraption. She squatted and lopped off a couple branches of the blooming turtlehead plant. "This is the host plant for the Baltimore checkerspot butterflies," she said, holding a flower in the palm of her hand. "They are becoming more and more scarce, which means the checkerspots have no place to lay their eggs. And therefore their population is decreasing."
BUSINESS
By Jon Van and Jon Van,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 17, 2005
Taking a step toward halting the decline of America's leadership in technology, International Business Machines Corp. said yesterday that it will help its veteran employees launch new careers teaching math and science. IBM will give the employees salaries and benefits while they take necessary courses to become teachers. It will also pay tuition costs up to $15,000. The effort will begin in January with a pilot program in New York and North Carolina that will include up to 100 IBM employees.
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