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By Janene Holzberg | March 21, 2013
When Debra Buczkowski was 7, in 1976, NASA's Viking space probes were landing on Mars and sending images of the red planet back to Earth as part of their $1 billion mission. “I realized that no matter where I went on this planet, I couldn't pick up anything in those photos,” the New York native says, recalling how that mesmerized her. Her early appreciation for the wonders of astronomy led to a career mapping structures on other rocky bodies like Earth, such as Mercury and Mars, as opposed to the gas giants, like Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune, she says.
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By Arthur Hirsch and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
In the age of smartphones and tablets, delivering restaurant food can be more than just taking calls, making the stuff, bagging it and sending a guy out in a rundown Toyota. On the fourth floor of a refurbished broom factory in Canton, a room full of young men in T-shirts, polo shirts and Orioles caps work at a long table laden with computers on OrderUp, a food service with a technology twist. They're busy with the further development of the technology that their company combined with logistical calculation to create a formula that's delivering in 36 markets from Maryland to California.
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NEWS
December 2, 2012
It's wonderful that in our age of instant communication, digital reality and unmanned aerial warfare, there are still those who believe in miracles. And yes, miracles are very real, though infrequent. I'm one who's also hoping for the complete recovery of Teresa Bartlinski ("Call for a miracle," Nov. 29). However, it is important to credit the "miracle" of modern science that has made this adopted girl's survival possible. I also consider it a "miracle" that the Bartlinski family can pay for all the medical care and upcoming operation out of pocket and were able to go into enormous debt doing so. It's refreshing and humbling the Bartilinski's have not relied on any help from the government or taxpayer funded programs.
NEWS
September 29, 2014
Most people who kill themselves do so from a place of great pain, hopelessness, self-worthlessness and despair. But suicide is best explained not with reference to the concepts of philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre (as was done in the Sept. 24 commentary, "Explaining the inexplicable: suicide" . That's like trying to explain why people die from malaria by quoting Aristotle. Severe depression is an illness. Everybody should know that. States with the highest rates of people taking their own lives have many characteristics in common, including a shortage of facilities for the treatment of mental disorders; proportionately larger populations of groups most prone to suicide, including Caucasians, Native Americans and men; higher rates of alcohol abuse, unemployment, poverty, geographic and social isolation; widespread gun ownership; and the "cowboy mentality" in which self-reliant individualism is lauded and help-seeking is eschewed, and as a result, psychology, psychiatry and mental health practitioners often are looked upon with suspicion or distain.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2013
Former Baltimorean Katherine Bouton abruptly lost the hearing in her left ear at age 30. One minute she could hear, and the next, she could not. Over the decades, her impairment worsened. By the time she was 60, she was functionally deaf. But her reluctance to disclose her ailment only increased. And who can blame her? She worked in a highly competitive environment, as a senior editor at The New York Times. In retrospect, Bouton says, remaining silent was a mistake; her hearing impairment contributed to her abrupt departure after 22 years at the newspaper.
NEWS
August 18, 1995
Science is a discipline that unravels so many mysteries of the world around us. Yet the field always seemed stumped by this quandary: How not to be so boring.If ever a subject glazed young eyes, it was science. The teacher with slide rule in the breast pocket monotoning his or her way through a presentation on the overheard projector; that's how science was typically presented in the past.Now there seems to be recognition that science wasn't being conveyed in its best light, that a numbing presentation of facts masked its appeal, even drama.
NEWS
By Wendy Wagner and Rena Steinzor | March 30, 2009
President Barack Obama's order this month striking down Bush-era barriers to embryonic stem cell research overshadowed his perhaps larger announcement on science that day: He directed his science adviser to develop a comprehensive plan to protect science from politics in his administration. That's a worthy enterprise, and it will be a challenge given the vast scope of the problem. During the Bush years, it was all too common for administration political appointees to suppress or reshape scientific findings.
NEWS
October 31, 2011
The letter from Donald Boesch, "Climate change is real" (Oct 29) seems to typify for me the problem underlying many of these science vs. special interest debates that constantly roil public opinion in the U.S. and prevent the effective implementation of common sense public policy. Climate change and environmental policy is not the only example. Evolution and the origins of the universe are other famous examples which have affected education policy, and we see the first glimmers of new issues arising regarding vaccination and health policy.
NEWS
July 13, 2010
The Page One article ("Obama rebuked over science," July 12) addressed concerns by various scientists that the Obama administration is disregarding science in decision-making to the same extent as did the Bush administration. Unfortunately, views of many of the scientists quoted in the article seem based on the false premise that science can provide unequivocal answers to difficult questions, and on the belief that their own answers (which the administration is ignoring) are the correct ones.
NEWS
August 4, 2005
IT'S NOT SURPRISING that, when given the opportunity, President Bush would send sympathetic signals to his Christian conservative followers to show his support for their causes. That may have been what he was doing this week when he endorsed the teaching of "intelligent design" along with the theory of evolution in a wide-ranging interview with a small group of reporters from Texas. Mr. Bush said that both theories should be taught "so people can understand what the debate is about." Well, thanks, Mr. Bush, but there really should be no debate.
NEWS
By Matthew Bobrowsky | September 26, 2014
Now that Congress is back from its summer recess, members are considering a number of appropriation bills. Priorities are being weighed, and I hope - given our increasingly technological society - scientific research and science education are high on the list. The development of innovations and new products, particularly in medicine and electronics, depends heavily on scientific research. Besides expanding the sum of human knowledge, federally funded scientific research grows our economy and improves the quality of life for all Americans.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
He didn't even finish his degree at the University of Maryland, College Park, but entrepreneur Brendan Iribe found other creative geniuses and best friends as he tinkered in the computer science department there. So on Friday, he will give the university $31 million - the largest gift the university has ever received - to build a new computer science building with a focus on virtual reality. "It is transformational for our university and our college. What Brendan Iribe is doing is creating a center.
NEWS
By Kym Byrnes, For The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2014
If a bus-sized iron asteroid traveling at approximately 12 miles per second hit New York City, would Baltimore be spared? The answer to this and other space questions can be found in Discover Space, an interactive learning exhibit on display at the Baltimore County Public Library's Towson branch through Oct. 29. Lisa Hughes, manager of the branch on York Road, said the exhibit will appeal to patrons from elementary aged kids to seniors....
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
Atwater's will open a restaurant at the Science + Technology Park at Johns Hopkins, an 88-acre mixed-use science campus under development in Baltimore's Middle East neighborhood.  Atwater's will take over the space in the Rangos Building that had been Cuban Revolution, which closed late last year. Opened in February 2013, Cuban Revolution was the first new restaurant to open in the emerging district, which is being developed by the Forest City-New East Baltimore Partnership.   The new restaurant will have its formal opening in early October but will be open for business sometime in mid-September, according to a spokesman for the Forest City Enterprises, Inc. This will be the sixth location for Ned Atwater's Catonsville-based group of cafes and markets.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2014
Dr. Richard G. Thomas Jr., a longtime Baltimore County educator who helped in the integration of county public schools in the 1950s, died Thursday of complications of a stroke at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The Harwood resident was 82. The son of Richard G. Thomas Sr., a businessman, and Hattie V. Thomas, a homemaker, Richard Garnett Thomas Jr. was born in Anne Arundel County and raised in Harwood and Lothian. "He was raised in a home that nurtured and inspired educational pursuits, excellence, high morals and service to others," said his sister, Dr. Thelma Thomas Daley of Baltimore, who had been counseling coordinator for Baltimore County public schools.
NEWS
By Will Fesperman, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2014
The Dreambuilder was making slow progress. The 35-foot-long sailboat meandered in the waters off Annapolis on Wednesday as its teenage crew stood on deck and watched in dismay. “I don't think I've ever gone so fast,” Tommy Pipher, 16, said dryly from the helm. “I think the rudder's broken,” said Ellie Wood, 16. Pipher and Wood, rising juniors at South River High School in Edgewater, are part of a group of 13 students who have been learning the ins and outs of sailing and navigation over two weeks at the National Sailing Hall of Fame, a sailing education nonprofit in Annapolis.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | July 14, 2014
New research suggests that Americans aren't obese because we eat too much. It's because we exercise too little. And by too little I mean, not at all. And whatever exercise we get peaks before the age of 10 - and perhaps as early as 2 - and is in steady decline after that, according to another study. Researchers at Stanford University Medical Center examined 22 years of data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, a long-term project of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
NEWS
July 8, 2014
In a recent column in The Sun, Peter Morici states that he cannot be a scientist and a liberal at the same time ( "Why I can't be a scientist and a liberal," July 1). He is correct! The fact is, he can never call himself a scientist because economics is not a science, and economists are not scientists. Embracing political positions has nothing to do with science nor does it qualify you as a scientist. David Mauriello, Severna Park - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
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