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NEWS
January 4, 2005
On January 2, 2005, MARTINSCHWARZKOPF; beloved husband of the late Else Martha Schwarzkopf (nee Stoole); devoted father of Martha R. Gagalski and the late John R. Schwarzkopf; loving grandfather of Susan A. and her husband Duane E. Hufman and Tammy A. Dressel; great-grandfather of Amanda and Brittany Hufman. Services at the family owned Evans Chapel of Memories - Parkville, on Wednesday, at 11 A.M. Interment Parkwood Cemetery. Visiting Tuesday, 2 to 4 and 6 to 8 P.M.
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BUSINESS
Patrick Maynard and The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2012
Why is “Trouble Maker,” a K-pop song that's been around for a year, suddenly getting worldwide Twitter love? I blame end-of-year lists and an upcoming awards ceremony. On a less global scale, residents along the East Coast continue to be curious about this weekend's weather, and Maryland residents are getting antsy about whether Congress will manage to avoid the fiscal cliff. Additionally, there's national attention focused on what lawmakers decide to do regarding guns. Finally, a member of Australia's Janoskians has given opinions on his favorite foods.
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NEWS
March 5, 2003
On March 3, 2003, GRACE M. (nee Smith), beloved wife of the late Charles W. Schwarzkopf, loving mother of Charles T. Sr. and Wayne P. Schwarzkopf, loving grandmother of Charles Schwarzkopf, Jr., Brian Schwarzkopf, Amanda Gilmer and Dean Schwarzkopf and great-grandmother of Ethan, Christopher and Morgan GilmerFriends may call at the Johnson Funeral Home, P.A., 8521 Loch Raven Blvd. (beltway exit 29B) on Tuesday and Wednesday from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 P.M. Family and friends are invited to attend a Funeral Mass on Thursday in The Church of The Immaculate Heart of Mary at 10 A.M. Interment Most Holy Redeemer Cemetery.
FEATURES
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,Sun reporter | May 10, 2008
On a warm, sun-drenched morning this week, Stefan Schwarzkopf stood in a clearing near the historic pagoda in Southeast Baltimore's Patterson Park, gazed across the emerald-colored slope on which he had been working and gave a satisfied sigh. "It's awesome to be able to get out of the normal routine ... and just be out of doors for a while," he said.
NEWS
May 5, 1991
Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf commander of U.S. forces in the Persian Gulf, recently received a teddy bear, compliments of Send-A-Friend Inc. of Pasadena.His new "friend" was decorated in Army fatigues and displayed a yellow ribbon that said. "Welcome Home" on the front.Send-A-Friend Inc. for customizes teddy bears for any occasion as an alternative to flowers and other gifts.The company has shipped the 14-inch bears all over the world.A full set of accessories, including hats, balloons and 200 other items are available for customizations.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 21, 1991
RIYADH, Saudi Arabia -- Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf, outspoken architect of the U.S.-led victory in the Persian Gulf war, bade an emotional farewell to Saudi Arabia yesterday and headed home.Marking the formal end to the U.S. combat role in the Persian Gulf, General Schwarzkopf saluted his troops and departed from Riyadh Air Base, saying that his mission was completed despite personal disappointment that Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein rTC remains in power and dismay over the plight of refugees.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | March 27, 1991
The meteoric rise of Gen. Norman Schwarzkopf to mythological status doesn't get slowed down at all by the hour-long "Talking with David Frost" interview that will air on PBS tonight.While Frost doesn't adopt the hem-kissing, hero-worshiping posture that has become so common among those who dare to approach the military hero of the Persian Gulf, he clearly tries to steer clear of the confrontational style that so many in the press adopted during the war.Instead, he conducts the interview -- taped in Saudi Arabia a week ago, airing tonight at 8 o'clock on Maryland Public Television, channels 22 and 67 -- with something of a diplomatic mein, a we're-above-it-all-now approach, trying to get himself up onto Schwarzkopf's cushy cloud instead of attempting to get the general to descend to the land of mere mortals once again.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor | October 5, 1992
Washington -- When Norman Schwarzkopf sat down last year to write his autobiography, he had a good idea of what he wanted to present. It would be a straightforward account of his 35 years of service in the U.S. Army, something like "The Personal Memoirs of U.S. Grant" -- a book he admired greatly and one considered one of the best memoirs by a military man.The bulk of the book, of course, would deal with Mr. Schwarzkopf's own role as commander-in-chief of...
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 24, 1991
NEW YORK -- After a hotly contested auction, Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf has sold the world rights of his planned book to Bantam Books for a sum estimated at more than $5 million.In a statement yesterday, Bantam said the four-star general, who commanded the allied forces in the Persian Gulf war, would begin work on his autobiography immediately after his retirement from the Army on Aug. 31.The writer who will work with him on the book, which has no title yet, has not been chosen.Marvin Josephson, the general's agent, said that competition among publishers for the book had been intense but that the final choice had been between Bantam and Random House Inc. A senior editor at Random House said the company had bid $5 million, suggesting that Bantam paid more.
FEATURES
By Peter Honey and Peter Honey,Washington Bureau | March 12, 1993
Retired Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf was back in front of the cameras yesterday with the same gravelly voice and the familiar 6-foot-3-inches of ruddy, cow-licked ebullience that characterized his command of the Persian Gulf War.This time, though, he was campaigning for nature conservation and, instead of camouflage-print military fatigues, he wore a $600 pin-stripe suit and navy tie flecked with tiny, luminous green leaves.The general, who retired after the gulf war victory with a $5 million book contract and seemingly endless speaking and touring engagements, appeared at a catered press conference here yesterday to publicize an ambitious effort by the Nature Conservancy to raise $300 million for coordinated conservation projects, including protection of thousands of acres of Chesapeake Bay watershed.
FEATURES
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | August 8, 2006
There are none left. Well, almost none. The death last week of Elisabeth Schwarzkopf, the German soprano famed for her Schubert and Strauss, continued a sad cycle. In the space of two short years, we've lost Victoria de los Angeles, Renata Tebaldi, Anna Moffo and Birgit Nilsson. (And that's just the sopranos.) One after another, the deaths remind us how good the good old days really were in plenitude and quality of vocal artists. They just don't make them like that any more, the same way they don't make them like Joan Crawford, Barbara Stanwyck, Bette Davis or Katharine Hepburn.
NEWS
August 5, 2006
Elisabeth Schwarzkopf, 90, a famed soprano who won international acclaim for her renditions of Mozart and Strauss, died Thursday in the town of Schruns, Austria. Ms. Schwarzkopf, ranked alongside Maria Callas as a giant of the opera and concert stage, retired in 1975 after captivating audiences and critics alike during a career that spanned four decades. Her leading roles, ranging from Elvira in Mozart's Don Giovanni to the Marschallin in Richard Strauss' Der Rosenkavalier, were immortalized on records and CDs. So were her recitals of lieder - German songs of a lyrical, often popular character.
NEWS
January 4, 2005
On January 2, 2005, MARTINSCHWARZKOPF; beloved husband of the late Else Martha Schwarzkopf (nee Stoole); devoted father of Martha R. Gagalski and the late John R. Schwarzkopf; loving grandfather of Susan A. and her husband Duane E. Hufman and Tammy A. Dressel; great-grandfather of Amanda and Brittany Hufman. Services at the family owned Evans Chapel of Memories - Parkville, on Wednesday, at 11 A.M. Interment Parkwood Cemetery. Visiting Tuesday, 2 to 4 and 6 to 8 P.M.
NEWS
March 5, 2003
On March 3, 2003, GRACE M. (nee Smith), beloved wife of the late Charles W. Schwarzkopf, loving mother of Charles T. Sr. and Wayne P. Schwarzkopf, loving grandmother of Charles Schwarzkopf, Jr., Brian Schwarzkopf, Amanda Gilmer and Dean Schwarzkopf and great-grandmother of Ethan, Christopher and Morgan GilmerFriends may call at the Johnson Funeral Home, P.A., 8521 Loch Raven Blvd. (beltway exit 29B) on Tuesday and Wednesday from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 P.M. Family and friends are invited to attend a Funeral Mass on Thursday in The Church of The Immaculate Heart of Mary at 10 A.M. Interment Most Holy Redeemer Cemetery.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | July 31, 2000
The Republicans all went to Philadelphia. Lock the gate. George took Dick for veep to get Lynne to campaign for the ticket. It is reassuring that Generals Powell and Schwarzkopf are still on the same side. Greenspan is right. The way to keep the boom going is to declare that it ended. Thirty thousand Shriners will descend on Baltimore in 2005. You have had ample warning.
BUSINESS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | September 24, 1999
Brian Schwarzkopf is expecting a big bonus next month, and he's talking about it.He said his friends are jealous but they're listening to his exhortation:Wait until Oct. 9 to do your shopping at Ikea.On Oct. 9, all gross sales at the Swedish home furnishings chain's 152 stores worldwide will be divided among the more than 40,000 employees.Schwarzkopf, 36, a marketplace decorator, is one of 303 IKEA employees at White Marsh."Everyone who is full-time gets an equal amount of the sales, whether they are CEO or work in the warehouse," Joakim Gip, external marketing manager for IKEA, said yesterday.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | March 29, 1991
Washington -- THAT WAS spellbinding television the other night when David Frost interviewed Gen. Norman Schwarzkopf. But at the same time it was very revealing about the perils for the gulf war commander should he yield to entreaties that he enter politics.In two specific areas, Schwarzkopf demonstrated a lack of the political sensitivity essential for anyone seeking high political office in the rough-and-tumble of a campaign covered intensely by the news media.First, in confessing that he was "suckered" by Saddam Hussein into granting permission for Iraq to fly helicopters after the coalition assault was halted, the general displayed admirable but politically damaging candor.
NEWS
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Staff | August 25, 1996
"Elisabeth Schwarzkopf," by Alan Jefferson. Northeastern University Press, 304 pages, $29.95.Although she retired from the stage in the late 1960s, Elisabeth Schwarzkopf will always be the beautiful and gracious Countess Almaviva of Mozart and Marschallin of Richard Strauss.The distinction of Alan Jefferson's useful new biography is that it shows us the relentless ambition that drove Schwarzkopf to become one of the most celebrated sopranos of her time. His portrait is not always pretty and it's easy to understand why the singer did not cooperate with the author, who gives the most complete account so far of Schwarzkopf's Nazi associations.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt | August 18, 1996
A GOODY-GOODY who keeps quiet and always does what she is told in an organization like an opera house, especially one with political affiliations, is not likely to attract much notice," writes Allan Jefferson in his new biography of the much-admired German soprano Elisabeth Schwarzkopf.Schwarzkopf, who in the years immediately after World War II became one of the world's pre-eminent divas, certainly was nobody's goody-goody. Supremely ambitious from the start, she was, Jefferson notes, "determined to be noticed as often and by as many people as possible.
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