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NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | March 4, 1998
I called Harvey Schulweis, the real estate tycoon, at his 50th-floor office in New York City early yesterday morning, and he answered the phone himself. And then he answered my first question: "Can you really do this, Harvey Schulweis?""Yes," he said. "We believe in the project."Without benefit of subsidy from the city of Baltimore or a high-five from our mayor, Schulweis plans to build a 600-room, four-star Westin Hotel across from the Inner Harbor. This, of course, separates him from the two other multimillionaires who want to build hotels here with millions of dollars from taxpayers.
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BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | August 10, 2001
A luxury apartment complex planned for an Inner Harbor parking lot would be one of the city's tallest buildings, according to plans presented to the city yesterday. New York developer Schulweis Realty Inc. unveiled designs for the 34-story building - 275 upscale apartments atop a 600-space garage and street-level retail space - to the Design Advisory Panel, the city's architectural reviewers. "We're trying to maximize the spectacular water views," said Thomas L. Brodie, Schulweis' managing director.
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BUSINESS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 7, 1997
Hoping to stop development of any hotel linked to the Baltimore Convention Center, the New York developer who wants to build a Westin on Pratt Street plans to offer to buy the city-owned site where Orioles owner Peter G. Angelos has proposed an 850-room Grand Hyatt.Harvey Schulweis, whose Schulweis Realty Inc. controls the former News American site, confirmed yesterday that he plans to offer the city at least $10 million for the 4-acre Camden Yards parking lots, for which the city is seeking development proposals.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | August 9, 2001
New York developer Harvey Schulweis plans to abandon his quest to bring a hotel to the former News American site in downtown Baltimore and, instead, build apartments and a garage. Schulweis is scheduled to present his vision today for housing at 300 E. Pratt St. to the city's Design Advisory Panel, the city's architectural reviewers. A spokesman for Schulweis did not return phone calls, and details of the project were not immediately learned. The site is currently used as a parking lot, but Schulweis had been trying to bring a $128.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | March 3, 1998
Shut out of city subsidies for his hotel, a New York developer has vowed to go ahead and build a 600-room downtown hotel without so much as a dime of public money.The decision by developer Harvey Schulweis to build a four-star Westin Hotel directly across from the Inner Harbor on Pratt Street by the fall of 2000 adds a new wrinkle to the city's controversial attempts to add more hotel rooms for the newly expanded Convention Center.The city has given the nod to proposals for two new hotels: a 750-room Wyndham at Inner Harbor East by baking mogul John Paterakis, which would get $50 million in tax breaks and public money; and an 800-room Grand Hyatt by Orioles owner Peter G. Angelos, which would connect to the Convention Center and get similar subsidies.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | August 9, 2001
New York developer Harvey Schulweis plans to abandon his quest to bring a hotel to the former News American site in downtown Baltimore and, instead, build apartments and a garage. Schulweis is scheduled to present his vision today for housing at 300 E. Pratt St. to the city's Design Advisory Panel, the city's architectural reviewers. A spokesman for Schulweis did not return phone calls, and details of the project were not immediately learned. The site is currently used as a parking lot, but Schulweis had been trying to bring a $128.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1998
When a New York developer abruptly declared last week that he would build a large hotel in downtown Baltimore with no public money, some city officials expressed doubt that it could be done.But as the City Council begins public hearings today on whether to approve $25 million in tax breaks to construct the long-debated, controversial Wyndham hotel, Harvey Schulweis' bid raises an important question:If a developer can shoulder the entire cost of building a large downtown hotel, why is the city willing to plunk down millions in grants and loans and forgo up to $45 million in tax breaks for both the proposed Wyndham and Grand Hyatt hotels?
NEWS
March 4, 1998
EVER SINCE the Schmoke administration gave the go-ahead to the taxpayer-subsidized Inner Harbor East Wyndham hotel a year ago, rival developer Harvey Schulweis has been acting like a jilted suitor. He has now dropped a bombshell by vowing to construct a 28-story hotel on Pratt Street, directly across from Harborplace, without any public subsidies whatsoever.Mr. Schulweis says he hopes to start construction of a 600-room Westin hotel and its 200-space underground garage in late summer and complete the project by the fall of 2000.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | August 10, 2001
A luxury apartment complex planned for an Inner Harbor parking lot would be one of the city's tallest buildings, according to plans presented to the city yesterday. New York developer Schulweis Realty Inc. unveiled designs for the 34-story building - 275 upscale apartments atop a 600-space garage and street-level retail space - to the Design Advisory Panel, the city's architectural reviewers. "We're trying to maximize the spectacular water views," said Thomas L. Brodie, Schulweis' managing director.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | November 20, 1997
Give Harvey Schulweis some credit: It's rarely easy to criticize your own company, especially when you're the president."Basically, we were in a death spiral," said Schulweis of Town & Country Trust's performance over the past few years.Schulweis may not be shy in his confession, but he's at least being honest.The Baltimore real estate trust specializes in apartment properties, but since going public in August 1993 it has been riddled with troubles surrounding debt maturity. This restricted its ability to buy new apartment complexes, which in turn hurt its stock price.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | May 8, 1998
Backing up his pledge to build a luxury hotel in downtown Baltimore without a dime of public money, New York developer Harvey Schulweis unveiled his design for the $124 million project yesterday and announced plans to break ground this fall.Schulweis and his architects released drawings for the former News American site that depict the hotel rising 12 stories along Pratt Street and 27 stories on the north side of the downtown property, a configuration that would give most of the 602 guest rooms unobstructed views of Baltimore's Inner Harbor.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | April 29, 1998
New York developer Harvey Schulweis, who pledged to bring a downtown hotel to Baltimore without a dime of public money, will take his latest design plans for the $124 million Westin hotel to the city's Architectural Review Board next week."
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1998
When a New York developer abruptly declared last week that he would build a large hotel in downtown Baltimore with no public money, some city officials expressed doubt that it could be done.But as the City Council begins public hearings today on whether to approve $25 million in tax breaks to construct the long-debated, controversial Wyndham hotel, Harvey Schulweis' bid raises an important question:If a developer can shoulder the entire cost of building a large downtown hotel, why is the city willing to plunk down millions in grants and loans and forgo up to $45 million in tax breaks for both the proposed Wyndham and Grand Hyatt hotels?
NEWS
March 4, 1998
EVER SINCE the Schmoke administration gave the go-ahead to the taxpayer-subsidized Inner Harbor East Wyndham hotel a year ago, rival developer Harvey Schulweis has been acting like a jilted suitor. He has now dropped a bombshell by vowing to construct a 28-story hotel on Pratt Street, directly across from Harborplace, without any public subsidies whatsoever.Mr. Schulweis says he hopes to start construction of a 600-room Westin hotel and its 200-space underground garage in late summer and complete the project by the fall of 2000.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | March 4, 1998
I called Harvey Schulweis, the real estate tycoon, at his 50th-floor office in New York City early yesterday morning, and he answered the phone himself. And then he answered my first question: "Can you really do this, Harvey Schulweis?""Yes," he said. "We believe in the project."Without benefit of subsidy from the city of Baltimore or a high-five from our mayor, Schulweis plans to build a 600-room, four-star Westin Hotel across from the Inner Harbor. This, of course, separates him from the two other multimillionaires who want to build hotels here with millions of dollars from taxpayers.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | March 3, 1998
Shut out of city subsidies for his hotel, a New York developer has vowed to go ahead and build a 600-room downtown hotel without so much as a dime of public money.The decision by developer Harvey Schulweis to build a four-star Westin Hotel directly across from the Inner Harbor on Pratt Street by the fall of 2000 adds a new wrinkle to the city's controversial attempts to add more hotel rooms for the newly expanded Convention Center.The city has given the nod to proposals for two new hotels: a 750-room Wyndham at Inner Harbor East by baking mogul John Paterakis, which would get $50 million in tax breaks and public money; and an 800-room Grand Hyatt by Orioles owner Peter G. Angelos, which would connect to the Convention Center and get similar subsidies.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | September 19, 1997
Harvey Schulweis, the heavy hitter from New York in Baltimore's downtown hotel game, doesn't like sitting on the bench. He's glum about it. "Not much amuses me these days," he says from his 50th-floor office on West 57th Street, which goes to show that even millionaire real estate tycoons can get a little blue in the gills.Schulweis has a good location for a hotel here -- the old News American site on Pratt Street across from the World Trade Center -- but he's been knocked out of the action because of our mayor's lame decision to subsidize John Paterakis' hotel at Inner Harbor East, way south of Little Italy, about a mile from the Convention Center.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,Sun Staff Writer | August 19, 1995
Town and Country Trust, the Baltimore-based apartment owner, said yesterday that it received $62 million in loans from First National Bank of Maryland that will be used to retire existing bank debt it carries at a much higher interest rate.The loans, which mature on Aug. 15, 1998, will retire in full a $52.5 million loan from NationsBank, which has a scheduled maturity of Feb. 1, 1996."We think it is an excellent transaction for us," said Harvey Schulweis, president of Town and Country, which owns and manages 13,631 units in 35 multifamily properties in the mid-Atlantic states.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | November 20, 1997
Give Harvey Schulweis some credit: It's rarely easy to criticize your own company, especially when you're the president."Basically, we were in a death spiral," said Schulweis of Town & Country Trust's performance over the past few years.Schulweis may not be shy in his confession, but he's at least being honest.The Baltimore real estate trust specializes in apartment properties, but since going public in August 1993 it has been riddled with troubles surrounding debt maturity. This restricted its ability to buy new apartment complexes, which in turn hurt its stock price.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | September 19, 1997
Harvey Schulweis, the heavy hitter from New York in Baltimore's downtown hotel game, doesn't like sitting on the bench. He's glum about it. "Not much amuses me these days," he says from his 50th-floor office on West 57th Street, which goes to show that even millionaire real estate tycoons can get a little blue in the gills.Schulweis has a good location for a hotel here -- the old News American site on Pratt Street across from the World Trade Center -- but he's been knocked out of the action because of our mayor's lame decision to subsidize John Paterakis' hotel at Inner Harbor East, way south of Little Italy, about a mile from the Convention Center.
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