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By MIKE PRESTON | January 7, 2008
I'm not disappointed that New England Patriots offensive coordinator Josh McDaniels will not interview with the Ravens. McDaniels is only 31, and that would have been a major factor if the Ravens had hired him as head coach. How could a coach that young walk into the Ravens' locker room and tell players such as Ray Lewis, Derrick Mason and Chris McAlister what to do? The Ravens just need to be patient. So many times, teams go after the hot coach, or look to find the candidate who coaches an area where they were weak in the previous season.
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By From Sun news services | December 8, 2008
The Cleveland Browns are formulating a plan that ultimately could lead to the return of Marty Schottenheimer (right) as their coach for the 2009 season, ESPN reported, citing anonymous sources. The Browns would also be open to considering Bill Cowher if he sends stronger signals that he's ready to return, the sources said. The Browns plan to fire coach Romeo Crennel after a disappointing year, the sources said. Publicly, owner Randy Lerner has said only that he will evaluate Crennel after the season.
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By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,Sun reporter | January 12, 2008
The Ravens have recently talked with veteran NFL coach Marty Schottenheimer about their head coaching vacancy, Schottenheimer's agent said yesterday. "There's been some discussion but nothing substantive," said Trace Armstrong, a former NFL player who represents Schottenheimer. Schottenheimer, 64, is expected to wait until the Ravens are done with the first round of interviews before speaking with them again. The hiring of Schottenheimer would entail the least amount of risk in replacing Brian Billick.
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By MIKE PRESTON | January 18, 2008
If the Ravens want to regain respect around the NFL, their only recourse now is to hire Marty Schottenheimer as head coach. Dallas Cowboys offensive coordinator Jason Garrett turned down the Ravens' offer yesterday, putting the Ravens in the same embarrassing class as the Atlanta Falcons, another team that can't find a head coach. The offensive coordinators from the New England Patriots and Cleveland Browns have declined to interview for the Ravens' job. Iowa coach Kirk Ferentz and former Pittsburgh Steelers coach Bill Cowher weren't interested.
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By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | January 11, 1999
The Ravens' search for a new head coach promises to intensify quickly, starting with a visit today by Pittsburgh defensive coordinator Jim Haslett, then continuing when the team interviews Jacksonville offensive coordinator Chris Palmer by midweek.And the effort to replace Ted Marchibroda could get especially interesting if Kansas City Chiefs coach Marty Schottenheimer becomes available.Schottenheimer, 55, coming off his first losing season since he took over in Kansas City in 1989, could resign this week, according to television reports yesterday.
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By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | September 27, 2001
ASHBURN, Va. - In a move that was stunning in its alacrity, Washington Redskins coach Marty Schottenheimer yesterday decided that Jeff George wouldn't be his starter, then elected to waive him from the roster. Schottenheimer, who benched George in the third quarter of the season opener against San Diego, then watched him guide the Redskins' offense in the franchise's worst shutout loss in 40 years in a 37-0 defeat Monday night in Green Bay, had seen enough. "I reached the point where I just didn't feel that the Washington Redskins could win with Jeff George as their starting quarterback," said Schottenheimer.
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By Glae Thien and Glae Thien,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 10, 2001
SAN DIEGO -- Washington Redskins quarterback Jeff George wouldn't comment on a budding controversy over his starting job after he was pulled in the third quarter of a 30-3 loss to the San Diego Chargers yesterday. In fact, he didn't say anything at all in departing the locker room after the season opener. After he was replaced by former Raven Tony Banks with the Redskins trailing 20-0, George had an animated discussion with Washington coach Mary Schottenheimer. But Schottenheimer refuted that it was a heated exchange.
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By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | October 30, 2001
ASHBURN, Va. -- Perhaps the larger lesson in the Washington Redskins' mini-turnaround is that the words just have to sink in before they can take hold. Since the beginning of training camp, coach Marty Schottenheimer has been saying that his system would work and that things would get better. While outsiders were laughing too hard at Washington's 0-5 start to hear Schottenheimer, his players were seeing enough incremental improvement to believe that something good was on the way. "We'd see things.
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By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | August 21, 2001
CARLISLE, Pa. -- Dave Szott did not need to be convinced by Washington Redskins coach Marty Schottenheimer to come out of semiretirement to shore up the team's fragile situation at left guard. Szott, 33, an 11-year veteran who signed late Sunday for the veteran's minimum of $477,000, thought the arm injury that forced him to miss all but one game with the Kansas City Chiefs last season cost him the proper ending to a pretty good career and was hoping for a chance to keep playing. That's why when Schottenheimer called last week to inquire about his interest, Szott, a seventh-round pick out of Penn State in 1990 who played for Schottenheimer for the first eight years of his career, was more than receptive.
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By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | August 24, 2001
It's too early in his tenure to place the genius label on Washington Redskins coach Marty Schottenheimer, especially since the team hasn't played a regular-season game and has looked occasionally sloppy on defense and special teams and downright inept on offense. But, heading into tonight's third preseason game with the Cleveland Browns, it may be fair to at least call Schottenheimer lucky, at least in the context of finding available veterans to come in and plug some of the holes that opened up in the preseason.
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By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,Sun Reporter | January 18, 2008
After getting stiff-armed by Jason Garrett yesterday, the Ravens regrouped for the next phase of their head coaching search, which could eventually include veteran coach Marty Schottenheimer, an NFL source said. Schottenheimer, who would be the biggest name attached to the Ravens' search, is not expected to get involved until the Ravens are done with this coming round of talks, the source added. Schottenheimer, 64, is the sixth-winningest coach in NFL history with 200 career regular-season victories, and only two losing seasons in 21 years.
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By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,Sun reporter | January 13, 2008
Marty Schottenheimer is the opposite of all that the Ravens seem to want in a head coach. He is old, narrow-minded and stubborn - a tired retread who has bounced around the NFL, irritating owners and players with his arrogant style and old-school tactics. Schottenheimer, 64, is the antithesis of all the young up-and-comers on the Ravens' wish list. But the Ravens appear interested - Schottenheimer's agent confirmed Friday that the two sides have spoken - because his system works. His teams win football games.
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By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,Sun reporter | January 12, 2008
The Ravens have recently talked with veteran NFL coach Marty Schottenheimer about their head coaching vacancy, Schottenheimer's agent said yesterday. "There's been some discussion but nothing substantive," said Trace Armstrong, a former NFL player who represents Schottenheimer. Schottenheimer, 64, is expected to wait until the Ravens are done with the first round of interviews before speaking with them again. The hiring of Schottenheimer would entail the least amount of risk in replacing Brian Billick.
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By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN REPORTER | January 8, 2008
Brian Schottenheimer, the New York Jets' offensive coordinator, became the fifth candidate to interview for the Ravens' head coaching position, spending more than four hours yesterday at the team's headquarters. Next on their interview list is Philadelphia Eagles secondary coach John Harbaugh, who has been granted permission to speak to the Ravens and will visit with team officials today. Though Schottenheimer is considered a long shot, Harbaugh is an intriguing candidate. Harbaugh, 45, the brother of former Ravens quarterback Jim Harbaugh, is considered one of the rising assistants in the NFL. A longtime special teams coach, Harbaugh switched to defensive assistant in order to better position himself for a head coaching job. For Schottenheimer, this is the second straight year he has interviewed for a head coaching job. Schottenheimer, 34, was a finalist for the Miami Dolphins' opening last year before withdrawing from consideration to remain with the Jets.
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By MIKE PRESTON | January 8, 2008
Some time soon, the Ravens should huddle with Marty Schottenheimer and try to reach an agreement for him to become their new coach. Schottenheimer has what this franchise needs. He's a good leader, a proven winner and has a strong overall knowledge of the game. But here's what the Ravens, and other teams Schottenheimer has worked for, don't like: He's too old-school, a control freak and a divisive force among the coaching staff, front office and players. He's like the old Tom Coughlin, the New York Giants coach.
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By MIKE PRESTON | January 7, 2008
I'm not disappointed that New England Patriots offensive coordinator Josh McDaniels will not interview with the Ravens. McDaniels is only 31, and that would have been a major factor if the Ravens had hired him as head coach. How could a coach that young walk into the Ravens' locker room and tell players such as Ray Lewis, Derrick Mason and Chris McAlister what to do? The Ravens just need to be patient. So many times, teams go after the hot coach, or look to find the candidate who coaches an area where they were weak in the previous season.
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By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,SUN STAFF | January 15, 2002
The revolving door that turned out Norv Turner, Terry Robiskie and Marty Schottenheimer spun once more yesterday, and finally delivered a coach Washington Redskins owner Dan Snyder can live with. Steve Spurrier, who made Gainesville, Fla., a mecca for college football, will arrive today at the Redskins' training facility in Ashburn, Va., with a similar design as their new coach. "Steve Spurrier will bring a supercharged, exciting and dynamic brand of football to our great fans," Snyder said.
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By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | November 14, 2001
ASHBURN, Va. - With a three-game winning streak and a new lease on postseason life, things are getting serious for the Washington Redskins as they return to work after an open date. The easiest way to tell is the effort Redskins coach Marty Schottenheimer is applying in saying as little as possible. Presented the opportunity yesterday to be definitive about the roles and health of some key players heading into Sunday's game in Denver, Schottenheimer took the road less clear on just about every occasion.
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By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,Sun reporter | January 2, 2008
The Ravens' search committee engaged in an all-day meeting yesterday to discuss potential coaching candidates. While team officials aren't about to mention possible successors to Brian Billick, they do have one prediction. "I think that any potential head coach that looks at Ozzie Newsome's history of drafting Pro Bowl players and sees the Pro Bowlers [already on the team] ...
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By MIKE PRESTON | November 30, 2007
During his nine-year tenure in Baltimore, coach Brian Billick often has delivered a great nugget of information, but the Ravens' front office obviously wasn't paying attention. Billick would say that the shelf life of an NFL head coach is 10 years, and that makes you wonder why the Ravens signed him to a four-year contract extension at the end of last season. We all know why Billick signed. He couldn't wait to complete an agreement that reportedly pays him $5 million per season. But it was a mistake to sign Billick to an extension of that length.
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