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By Daniel Gallen and The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2013
Infielder Jonathan Schoop, the Orioles' top position player prospect who has missed the past two months with a stress fracture in his lower back, returned to action earlier Thursday in the Gulf Coast League. Schoop went 0-for-2 with a walk in six innings in his first game action since May 12. He was hitting .268/.331/.386 with three home runs and 18 RBIs for Triple-A Norfolk at the time of his injury. Manager Buck Showalter said the 21-year-old will spend about a week in the Gulf Coast League before rejoining Norfolk.
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SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
KANSAS CITY, Mo. - Even if the Orioles end up losing to the Kansas City Royals in the American League Championship Series this week, there's a sense that the experience itself will help the club going forward - especially for the younger players who didn't participate in the 2012 postseason. "It's huge, especially because I hope we are back here next year and the near future, and hopefully I am starting one of these games," rookie right-hander Kevin Gausman said. "Any time you have success in the postseason, it definitely helps, not only yourself but your confidence level and also says a lot about your career.
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SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2013
Rookie second baseman Jonathan Schoop came to Camden Yards on Saturday afternoon feeling sore in several areas, prompting team doctors to check him out. Schoop twisted his lower torso awkwardly in a rundown while playing second base Friday night. He remained in the game and was fine, but it was a different story Saturday morning, Orioles manager Buck Showalter said. Schoop missed several weeks this season because of a stress fracture in his back, and the Orioles want to make sure his soreness is not related to that injury.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2014
TORONTO -- Moments after their 1-0 victory over the Toronto Blue Jays on Sunday, the Orioles finally found out who they would face in the American League Division Series. It had been a 12-day wait since the Orioles clinched the AL East. But inside the visiting clubhouse of the Rogers Centre, as the Orioles packed their bag for the trip home to Baltimore - it wasn't baseball, but NFL football on the televisions. The Orioles believe they are ready for the Detroit Tigers, who will travel to Camden Yards to open the ALDS on Thursday.
NEWS
By Scott Higham and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1996
The star witness in the maritime union corruption case against Harry Seidman is heading to federal prison -- despite helping prosecutors and investigators crack an elaborate kickback scheme that cost union members more than $800,000.Ronald Schoop, 60, was ordered to serve eight months behind bars yesterday for his role in the scheme, which siphoned the money from the International Organization of Masters, Mates and Pilots in Linthicum Heights for nearly 15 years.Sending a signalU.S. District Judge Benson E. Legg said he wanted the sentence to send a signal that white-collar corruption is a serious crime, and Schoop and Seidman betrayed the trust of of the 7,000-member union that represents ship captains and deck officers around the world.
NEWS
By Scott Higham and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | September 19, 1996
A hard drinker. A heavy gambler. A turncoat who would betray his best friend to save himself from a federal prison term.Defense lawyers for Harry Seidman -- accused of embezzling $800,000 from an international maritime union based outside Baltimore -- had some harsh words yesterday and Tuesday for the government's star witness.Attorney Mark J. Biros tried to show jurors in U.S. District Court in Baltimore that the prosecution's case against Seidman, a former financial officer for the union, rests on the unreliable word of one man: a tough-talking New Yorker named Ronald Schoop.
NEWS
By Scott Higham and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | September 27, 1996
The man who controlled the finances of an international maritime union for nearly 35 years was found guilty yesterday of skimming more than $800,000 in an elaborate embezzlement kick-back scheme he ran with his former friend.Jurors in U.S. District Court in Baltimore wasted little time returning their verdicts against Harry Seidman. After hearing dozens of witnesses and seeing more than 1,000 exhibits during the 2 1/2 -week trial, they took less than five hours to find Seidman guilty on all 13 embezzlement counts.
NEWS
By Scott Higham and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | September 17, 1996
During their 20-year friendship, Ronald Schoop did plenty of favors for Harry Seidman, who held the purse strings of an international maritime union headquartered outside Baltimore.Schoop gave him a Cartier watch. He served as best man at his wedding. And when Seidman's daughter graduated from law school, Schoop paid for the party, according to court records and testimony.But the favors finally ran out yesterday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore. Schoop took the stand as the government's star witness against Seidman, 64, who faces 13 embezzlement counts for allegedly skimming more than $800,000 from the union in Linthicum Heights.
NEWS
By Scott Higham and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | January 11, 1997
His daughter tearfully pleaded for mercy. So did his brother.Then, with his family members sobbing in the gallery of a federal courtroom in Baltimore yesterday, Harry Seidman took the stand to say he was innocent of embezzling more than $900,000 from an international maritime union in Maryland and didn't deserve a tough prison term."
BUSINESS
June 8, 1996
The owner of a defunct Columbia printing company pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court in Baltimore yesterday to charges of conspiring with a maritime union official to embezzle nearly $400,000 from the union.Ronald Schoop was charged last month with Harry Seidman, former comptroller of the International Organization of Masters, Mates and Pilots, with conspiring to embezzle union money. The charges were contained in a criminal information, rather than an indictment, suggesting that Schoop cooperated with the government.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
The Orioles go for the sweep against the Cincinnati Reds tonight at Camden Yards and their two newest arrivals will start together for the first time. Outfielder Alejandro De Aza, who started Tuesday, is batting second and playing left field. Kelly Johnson will get his second consecutive start at third base Thursday. It's the first time the two veterans, who were acquired in separate trades Saturday night, are starting together for the Orioles. Otherwise no real surprises in the Orioles lineup.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
Manager Buck Showalter stood in the Orioles dugout Tuesday night talking to player development director Brian Graham about the distinct sound that the bat makes when Jonathan Schoop squares up a pitch. Moments later, Schoop sent a pitch into the Reds bullpen for a solo home run in the Orioles' 5-4 win over the Cincinnati Reds. “You stand around the cage, and there are certain guys who have that different sound off their bat,” Showalter said “About that time I said that, it was, 'Yeah, that sound,' as it was leaving the park.” In the Orioles' 6-0 victory over the Reds on Wednesday, Schoop bettered himself.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2014
CLEVELAND -- Televisions in the Orioles' clubhouse have shown the Little League World Series recently, and the major leaguers have been paying attention. But no Orioles player may be more interested than 22-year-old second baseman Jonathan Schoop. This month marks the 10th anniversary of when Schoop's Pabao Little League club from his native Curacao beat Thousand Oaks, Calif., 5-2, to become the first Caribbean team to win the Little League World Series. Schoop picked up the save in that title game.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
After his eighth-inning homer tied the game Wednesday night in the Orioles' eventual 5-2 win, Jonathan Schoop struggled to explain the magic that seems to be in his bat when he faces the New York Yankees. While Adam Jones' three-run blast -- the 12th of his 23th homers this season that has given the Orioles the lead -- was the difference in the game, Schoop's homer was monumental in the comeback. And in nine games against the Yankees this season, Schoop is hitting .380 (11-for-29)
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2014
If you weren't certain before, Wednesday night at Camden Yards confirmed it: The American League East is officially on its ear. It was the Orioles who bided their time against a filthy starter, battered the underbelly of the opposition's bullpen and moved further ahead in the division standings. With a 5-3 comeback victory paced by eighth-inning home runs from Jonathan Schoop and Adam Jones, the Orioles pulled a Yankee on the New York Yankees. “We are just playing good baseball,” said Jones, whose two-out, three-run blast landed in the Orioles' bullpen.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2014
Tonight is Crush Davis Action Figure night at Camden Yards, with the first 10,000 fans 14 and under getting a plastic action figure of Chris Davis as a caped crusader. The real Davis will begin the game on the bench. Last year's Most Valuable Oriole is hitting just .196 with 125 strikeouts in 321 at-bats this year. With Seattle's tough, young left-hander James Paxton on the mound, the left-handed-hitting Davis wasn't in the starting lineup. The first baseman also has been dealing with a flu virus that caused him to miss two full games earlier this week.
NEWS
By Scott Higham and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | September 10, 1996
At the maritime union's headquarters on the outskirts of Baltimore, not much was sacred.Prosecutors said in court yesterday that double-billing was rampant. So were kickbacks, gifts, trips, even visits to massage parlors. And when the union wanted to publish copies of its constitution for its 7,000 members, a kickback allegedly was part of the plan.The claims came during opening statements in the federal corruption trial of Harry Seidman, 64, former comptroller of the International Organization of Masters, Mates and Pilots, a union that represents ship captains and deck officers in seaports in the United States and abroad.
NEWS
By S. Mitra Kalita and S. Mitra Kalita,SUN STAFF | June 8, 1996
The owner of a now-defunct printing company pleaded guilty yesterday to charges of conspiring with the former comptroller of a Baltimore-based maritime union in an embezzlement scheme that cost the union more than $376,000.Mercury Graphics Inc. owner Ronald Schoop, 60, could be sentenced to up to five years in prison and be fined $250,000 for conspiring with Harry Seidman, 64, former comptroller of the International Organization of Masters, Mates and Pilots, to misappropriate the union money.
SPORTS
By Alejandro Zuniga and The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
When first base coach Wayne Kirby asked Jonathan Schoop to clear his locker Saturday, he hoped it would help the second baseman snap out of his struggles at the plate. So Schoop carried his belongings out of Camden Yards and then turned around and brought everything back in, pretending like he had just gotten called up from the minor leagues. “I was trying to refresh my mind,” Schoop said. “I was coming in like my season was just starting out. Tried to refresh, you never know.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
Not a lot to see here Friday in the Orioles' lineup against the Toronto Blue Jays at Camden Yards. Steve Pearce is batting second and Caleb Joseph starts again. Those are the only slight changes - and they really aren't surprising at this point. Ubaldo Jimenez is on the mound tonight and he is looking for his first win at Camden Yards. Not really a good thing considering it is mid-June and he was paid $50 million over four years to be the Orioles' ace. And one last thing: Yes, the tarp was on the field here.
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