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NEWS
By DONALD G. GIFFORD and LAURENCE M. KATZ | November 13, 1992
These are tough times for public legal education in Maryland. One newspaper story tells us that the state is facing another massive budget shortfall, there will be draconian budget cuts, and higher education will bear a disproportionate share. Another article describes a Baltimore law firm laying off 10 to 18 associates. At the highest level, our nation's leaders attack the legal profession.Even some people with good faith and good intentions might ask why the State of Maryland should pay for two public law schools within two miles of each other in the city of Baltimore.
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SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
Documents filed Friday in the University of Maryland's legal battle with the Atlantic Coast Conference show that subpoenas have been issued to at least 10 ACC schools - plus various broadcast media partners - seeking information about the ACC's $52 million exit fee and a number of other topics. In accompanying court filings, Maryland, which is contesting the exit fee as it prepares to join the Big Ten Conference in July, accuses the ACC of seeking to withhold information, along with more than $20 million in shared conference revenue.
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NEWS
By CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | March 7, 1996
The majority of Marylanders support mandatory random drug testing of high school students, according to a University of Maryland Research Center poll.Of 1,002 people surveyed, 76 percent said all high school athletes should be tested for drugs, and 61 percent said all students should be tested. The poll was conducted between Oct. 30 and Dec. 31.No schools in Maryland conduct random drug testing. The Supreme Court decided in June that schools can randomly test student athletes, but the constitutionality of randomly testing all students is unclear.
NEWS
October 2, 2013
Severna Park High School came in No. 8 and was the among four Anne Arundel County public schools in the top 30 Maryland high schools on a list compiled by U.S. News and World Report. The rankings were based on reports conducted by the magazine that measured: student/teacher ratios; how seniors performed on their Advanced Placement tests; and how they performed in the subjects of math and reading on state exit exams. “I am very proud of our students and community for their continued commitment to education,” said Severna Park High School Principal Patrick Bathras in a release from the county school system.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | September 9, 2000
In a statewide inspection of school buses suspected of having faulty brakes, six buses were found to have frayed wiring that could render anti-lock braking systems ineffective, state education officials reported yesterday. The wiring problems were found in buses in Anne Arundel, Garrett and Prince George's counties. Repairs were made and the buses put back in service. The inspections in Maryland's 24 school systems were prompted by alerts issued this week by Bendix Commercial Vehicle Systems about its anti-lock braking system and air brakes installed on buses made beginning in 1998.
NEWS
January 19, 1996
Sister Augustine, 91, Seton High School teacherSister Augustine Troy, a member of the Daughters of Charity who taught history and home economics for 28 years at Seton High School in Baltimore, died Sunday of congestive heart failure at Villa St. Michael in Emmitsburg. She was 91.The former Mary Pleasants of Long Green graduated from Seton High and entered the Daughters of Charity in 1923. She earned a bachelor of science degree in social studies from St. Joseph College in Emmitsburg and a master's in education in guidance and psychology from Loyola College in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Mick Rood and Mick Rood,States News Service Norris P. West contributed to this story | September 20, 1990
Trinity School in Ellicott City and seven other elementary schools in Maryland have been honored as "blue ribbon" schools, a program of the Bush administration to improve the quality of education across the nation.The schools were among 180 public and 41 private schools recognized at a ceremony hosted by President Bush earlier this week on the south lawn of the White House.Gov. William Donald Schaefer and three other governors attended the ceremony as Bush sought to emphasize federal cooperation with the states in improving elementary schools.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,Sun reporter | October 7, 2007
River Hill High and Burleigh Manor Middle were honored by the U.S. Department of Education as two of seven No Child Left Behind-Blue Ribbon Schools in Maryland and two of 287 in the country. The National Blue Ribbon award recognizes academic excellence or major gains in achievement. Clarksville Middle School was a winner of the award last year. River Hill and Burleigh Manor will be recognized next month at a ceremony in Washington. "Their selection is very exciting," said Patti Caplan, county schools spokeswoman.
NEWS
December 8, 2007
Some of the methods used to improve failing schools in Maryland have not worked, according to the Center on Education Policy, a Washington-based research group. In a new report, the center concludes that one of the most common options - a turnaround specialist - is often ineffective. The same seems to be true of wholesale staff replacement, another increasingly popular solution. There's nothing easy or quick about fixing failing schools. But at a time of decreasing financial resources, thoughtful planning and careful monitoring are critical.
NEWS
January 7, 1993
It's one thing for the government to pay tuition for students to attend private schools, but it's another to transport those children safely to their schools -- be they public or private.That's the argument of some parents with children in Harford's 11 private schools who want the General Assembly to authorize free county school bus transportation for those pupils.Beyond the safety issue, however, is the matter of the cost of bus transportation, estimated between $380 and $680 per pupil annually.
SPORTS
By Matt Bracken and The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2012
CBSSports.com's Jeff Goodman posted his amazingly comprehensive Division I basketball transfer list this morning. With 300-plus names and counting, there were sure to be tons of local guys mentioned. Sure enough, eight players from the Baltimore area and 11 from Maryland DI schools were listed. Perhaps the most surprising name among former high school stars here is Jamar Briscoe , a 5-foot-10 guard from Charlotte. The Cardinal Gibbons grad was No. 15 on The Sun's inaugural Sweet 16 ranking after averaging 12.8 points, 3.9 rebounds, 3.0 assists and 1.5 steals and starting 28 games as a sophomore.
NEWS
April 3, 2011
The announcement that Maryland schools Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick will retire in June after 20 years on the job marks a watershed for public education in the state, whose history could fairly be divided into two eras — before and after Ms. Grasmick. Her extraordinary leadership raised the bar on what was possible for schools across the state and won Maryland national recognition as an education powerhouse. She's been called "the heart and soul" of Maryland schools. Whoever succeeds her will have big shoes to fill.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,Laura.vozzella@baltsun.com | September 24, 2009
A minor revolution, in the form of cheese lasagna, had come to the cafeteria at Hampstead Hill Academy, but the struggle had only just begun. Kitchen staff accustomed to heating pre-made meals had to wrestle with sticky pasta noodles, then brace for balky eaters on this, the first "Meatless Monday" for Hampstead Hill and other Baltimore public schools. On Mondays throughout the year, cafeteria menus will be all vegetarian - a first for city schools and, it's believed, any large school system nationwide.
NEWS
August 29, 2009
Abuse investigation should target Bush officials As someone who has protested outside the Department of Justice calling for an investigation of the Bush administration's use of torture, I was glad to hear that the attorney general has appointed a special prosecutor to probe CIA abuses. Thus I read with interest the editorial "Torture is un-American" (Aug. 25). However, we must be skeptical of the reach of the special prosecutor in this investigation. When the Abu Ghraib scandal exploded, there was an investigation.
NEWS
May 6, 2009
When Gov. Martin O'Malley shuttered five schools in Maryland last week after the discovery of several suspected cases of the swine flu, the closures seemed prudent given how little was known about the virulence of the disease and its ability to spread. Most of what we did know was ominous: It was a strain that had never appeared before in humans, it struck healthy, young adults, it appeared nearly simultaneously in countries around the world, and it was already responsible for more than 20 deaths in Mexico and one in the United States.
NEWS
By Matt Zapotosky and Jenna Johnson and Matt Zapotosky and Jenna Johnson,Washington Post | April 10, 2009
At least 14 of the 20 officers and crew aboard the U.S. container ship hijacked by Somali pirates in the Indian Ocean Wednesday attended union-run maritime schools in Maryland, and many received classroom training on how to handle a pirate or terrorist attack, school and union officials said Thursday. Nine of the twelve members of the Seafarers International Union who were aboard the Maersk Alabama attended the union's maritime school in the St. Mary's County town of Piney Point, the school's education director said.
NEWS
September 30, 2007
As reported Sept. 27, 1942, in The Sun: The high school students of Maryland and their 6,000,000 cohorts in the nation who will answer the President's call to mobilize for victory can see a preview of their share in the war effort at The Ellicott City High School. Starting a Victory Corps there will be only a matter of form. Every one of its 274 students is already participating in wartime service. Boys belong to the State Guard, the Maryland Minute Men or the Naval Militia. In apple orchards they are replacing men called to the armed forces.
NEWS
October 18, 1996
A man armed with a pistol robbed the High's convenience store in Hampstead on Wednesday, fleeing with an undisclosed amount of money, police said.An immediate search of the area near the South Main Street convenience store by Hampstead officers and state troopers was unsuccessful.Police said the man entered the store at 10: 40 p.m., flashed the gun and demanded money.Witnesses gave police a sketchy description of the robber, described as a white man about 30 years old.Anyone with information is asked to call Hampstead police at (410)
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,john-john.williams@baltsun.com | December 21, 2008
Hammond Middle School was one of six in the state to be selected as a 2008 Maryland Blue Ribbon School of Excellence. "This is such an honor and wonderful affirmation for the Hammond staff, students and parents," Principal Kerry McGowan said in a statement. "Everyone has worked so hard to make sure our students are achieving. We feel like we just got the very best holiday gift possible, tied up with blue ribbon." Hammond was able to distinguish itself after 95 percent of the school scored at proficient or advanced levels in reading on the 2008 Maryland School Assessments, a 6-point increase from 2007.
NEWS
September 14, 2008
The number of failing schools in Maryland is rising, and more than 60 percent of them are in Baltimore, where nearly a third of the schools are in dire need of improvement. A report by the Washington-based Center on Education Policy found that 63 schools in Baltimore were undergoing some form of restructuring because they failed to show adequate progress for two years in a row under the federal No Child Left Behind law. That's a wake-up call for citizens that despite the progress Baltimore has made, including this year's dramatic rise in test scores, much remains to be done.
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