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BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 28, 2003
Four schools in Howard County closed by 11 a.m. yesterday - sending more than 2,500 students home - after it became clear crews would not be able to restore electrical power knocked out by Tuesday's storm. "[Baltimore Gas and Electric] was successful in restoring power in so many schools that there was optimism about the prospect of their being able to restore power in our school as well," said Napoleon Saunders, assistant principal at Reservoir High School, which had to close at 10 a.m. Schools spokeswoman Patti Caplan said 17 schools lost power Tuesday night, but 13 of them had regained it by early morning.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2012
Howard County school officials are investigating an incident involving an 11-year-old autistic boy who was handcuffed by police officers on a school bus after he allegedly bit several adults and students. The child, who does not speak and has limited social skills, according to his mother, was being transported from the Kennedy Krieger Institute in Baltimore, which accepts students whose severe learning disabilities require specialized education not provided by public school systems.
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NEWS
By Michael J. Clark and Michael J. Clark,Howard County Bureau of The Sun | December 22, 1990
Howard County School Superintendent Michael E. Hickey proposed yesterday what he called a budget that reflected "the new realities" -- a $201.5 million package that calls only for a longer high school day and enough new employees to keep pace with rising enrollment.Dr. Hickey's budget for next year would raise spending by $20.9 million, roughly 12 percent. It must be adopted by the Board of Education and reviewed by the county executive before it is sent to the County Council for approval.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2011
Norbel School, a private, nonprofit school in Elkridge for children with learning differences, will close July 1 because it has "insufficient enrollment and money to begin another school year," according to officials. The enrollment at the school, which served grades one through 12, has steadily declined over the past five years and this past year was 40 percent lower than five years ago, said Harry Siegel, attorney for the Norbel school board. Because of its struggles with enrollment and funding, the school's goal was to complete the academic year to allow seniors to graduate, officials said in a news release.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | January 7, 2003
The four days that Howard County public schools have been closed because of inclement weather have been added to the end of the school year. Instead of getting out June 12, students' last day of school is now June 18. Two more such closures could end up affecting spring break. "We have five [snow] days indicated on the calendar," schools spokeswoman Patti Caplan said. "If we go to six days, we'll need to go back to the Board of Education for a decision." Schools must provide 180 days of instruction.
NEWS
By Dana Klosner-Wehner and Dana Klosner-Wehner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 23, 2003
Howard County is known for its fine public school system. But for those parents who feel private school is the best option, many choices are available within the county lines. Although the words private school often conjure the image of the rich and elite, the families of those who attend say that is a stereotype. The dozens of nonpublic schools, as they are called by the State Department of Education, are as varied as the students who attend. The county is home to schools steeped in tradition, newer schools with fresh ideas, schools affiliated with religious organizations and schools for children with learning differences.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | March 17, 1997
Mary Williams of Elkridge teaches in a public school and grew up attending public schools in Howard County. But -- as long as she has the money -- she will never, ever send her 7-year-old grandson Chapman Kittrell to a public school.Even in Howard County? Especially in Howard.Even though the county's public school system continues to rack up the state's highest test scores, parents are increasingly rejecting Howard's public schools in favor of private schools and schooling their children at home.
NEWS
April 10, 1998
A Good Friday schedule of government offices, services and attractions in the region published in yesterday's editions included incorrect information on Baltimore libraries, Baltimore County offices and the reopening dates for the schools in Howard and Carroll counties.City libraries are closed today, Baltimore County offices are open today, Carroll schools reopen April 17 and Howard schools reopen April 20.The Sun regrets the errors.Pub Date: 4/10/98
NEWS
February 7, 1994
This week designated to appreciate employeesAt its Jan. 27 meeting, the Howard County Board of Education designated this week as Employee Appreciation Week.The resolution, presented by Superintendent Michael E. Hickey, is a means of expressing gratitude and thanks to employees of the Howard County public school system for the service, commitment and dedication to their responsibilities in educating and serving the needs of the children, youth and residents of Howard County.Presidents DayAll public schools in Howard County will be closed Feb. 21 in observance of Presidents Day. All public schools will reopen at their regular times Feb. 22.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | April 20, 2003
Dr. Mary Rockwell Hovet, a former assistant superintendent of schools in Howard County, died in her sleep Wednesday at Brighton Gardens assisted-living community in Columbia. She was 85 and lived in Clarksville. When she retired in 1981, Dr. Hovet had become one of the few women to rise to the superintendent level in Howard County, which led to her induction into the county's Women's Hall of Fame in 1997. "She was far ahead of her time," said Reva Bryant, a retired Howard County administrator who worked with Dr. Hovet in the 1970s.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2011
Centennial High School student Jasmine Holland told about 20 of her friends to try a new dish on the school lunch menu — a chicken salad wrap created by her and other culinary arts classmates that recently took first prize in the Howard County Public Schools' third annual Top Student Chef competition. "I told them they had to buy it. It's the best lunch on there," Holland said. As it turned out, Holland didn't need to spread the word. On a menu that included pepperoni pizza and tacos, many students chose the more healthful alternative — some unaware that their fellow students had created it — and they later said they'd be back for more.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,johnjohn.williams@baltsun.com | September 20, 2009
A number of top-ranking Howard County school system officials say that they like the way the showing of President Barack Obama's speech to the nation's students was handled, despite having little time to adequately prepare for it. The school system was given a couple of days' notice about the speech, which made it difficult to coordinate a better plan to share it, according to Sydney L. Cousin, superintendent of Howard County Public Schools. Most Baltimore-area districts let individual schools determine whether they showed the speech.
NEWS
By JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV | August 17, 2008
Six schools in Howard County fell short of meeting state-ordered progress goals in the past year and were placed on a list of underperforming schools, despite appeals filed by county education officials. The elementary schools were Bollman Bridge in Jessup and Stevens Forest in Columbia. The middle schools were Harper's Choice in Columbia, Patuxent Valley in Jessup, Murray Hill in Laurel and Oakland Mills in Columbia. At Bollman Bridge, students who receive free or reduced-price lunches, and those in special-education programs did not meet the proficiency standard in math, which led to the school's being placed on the Adequate Yearly Progress list.
NEWS
January 28, 2007
Afternoon tea set for female educators The women's giving Circle of Howard County will hold an Afternoon Tea for Women Educators from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Feb. 13 at Ten Oaks Ballroom in Clarksville. Linda Perlstein, journalist and author of a book based on her experiences at Wilde Lake Middle School, will speak. The topic, which is also the title of her book: Not Much Just Chillin': The Hidden Life of Middle Schoolers. Perlstein, who worked as a reporter at The Washington Post from 1994 to 2004, wrote about education and children.
NEWS
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 19, 2006
For the past month, Austin Kopnitsky has been grappling with constitutional issues. Is it OK to ban smoking in Howard County restaurants? Should government officials be allowed to meet in secrecy? Austin and fellow fifth-graders in Todd Garner's class at Atholton Elementary School argued and argued. They had not fully resolved the questions by Wednesday, when he and his classmates - dressed in their formal best - sat behind a table and answered questions before three judges. The event was the Simulated Congressional Hearings, which are taking place in 19 Howard County elementary schools this month and next.
NEWS
By MARINA SARRIS and MARINA SARRIS,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 19, 2006
For parent Anita Smith, Howard County's top-ranked public school system could not compete with what she found at Trinity School: Catholic instruction, a caring community and freedom from redistricting worries. "It's a beautiful, serene campus, and you walk there and feel protected. There probably isn't a teacher I don't know or a parent I don't say `hi' to. You feel like everyone cares," said Smith, who has two children at the school. She is among thousands of parents who send children to about three dozen nonpublic schools in Howard County.
NEWS
February 17, 1999
THE MARYLAND School Performance Assessment Program not only provides snapshots of schools that are successfully teaching, but insight into why others fail. A correlation often exists between test scores and family income.That's evident even in Howard, one of Maryland's most affluent counties, as a two-part series in The Sun recently showed.Howard's Laurel Woods Elementary, for example, more closely resembles an inner-city school than one in a suburban setting.Its North Laurel surroundings include dense population, drug abuse and petty crime.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2005
Howard High School's old auditorium and cafeteria have been knocked down. Scaffolds surround the building, and the main office has been relocated to the media center. The county's oldest high school is undergoing a major, three-year renovation project, which is slated to bring the aging building up to par with the district's newer schools. "It's quite dramatic," said Bruce Gist, the school system's construction program manager. When the multiphase, $30 million project is completed in December 2007, Howard High will have several new or updated features: a 900-seat auditorium, a larger cafeteria, an auxiliary gym, a wrestling room, a girls locker room and a music complex.
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