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By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2011
Bryant Woods Elementary School third-grader Ramal West, who recently moved to Columbia from Frederick, wasn't about to let Hurricane Irene dampen his spirits on the first day of school. "The hurricane was big, but now school's ready; everybody has brand-new clothes. I'm happy," said Ramal, who joined other Howard County students beginning the school year on Tuesday, one day later than scheduled because of power outages and other damage left in Irene's wake. However, 10 county schools did not have power and were not open.
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EXPLORE
August 28, 2011
Baltimore County Public Schools will be closed on Monday, Aug. 29, delaying the start of the new school year due to what officials called, "the continuing effects of Hurricane Irene. " By Sunday afternoon, 65 BCPS schools were without power, and safety concerns prompted school officials to close schools on what would have been the first day of the 2011-12 school year for students. "The passage of this storm had a widespread impact on our area, leaving many homes and schools without power, flooding many roadways, and creating conditions that would pose a hazard for many children," said Joe Hairston, superintendent of Baltimore County Public Schools.
NEWS
August 4, 2011
There is ample evidence that Baltimore County's school board has been failing to do its job of representing the community and holding the superintendent accountable. In just the last few years, we've had the debacle of an overheated Ridgely Middle School, ethics questions surrounding the system's use of a former top administrator's proprietary grading system and software, no-bid contracts with a firm run by a former colleague of Superintendent Joe A. Hairston, the uproar over the system's sudden crackdown on outside groups using the schools for fundraising, and the district's decision to fill administrative jobs instead of classroom positions.
NEWS
By Laurie Taylor-Mitchell and Lois Hybl | July 19, 2011
The recent reports on suspected cheating on standardized tests at some Baltimore City schools included the statement that school officials worry they might "have hit a wall in educating children. " Some of those walls have been in place for a long time in Maryland public schools - and they are dilapidated and moldy. Baltimore City and Baltimore County have the oldest school buildings in the state, and fewer than half of their schools have decent climate control, either in the hot months or the cold months.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2011
A charter network that has two schools in Baltimore has a high level of student attrition and of private and public funding that have positioned it to be successful, according to a national report published Thursday. The report on Knowledge is Power Program (KIPP), which opened its first school in Baltimore about a decade ago and recently reached a long-term deal to remain in the city for another 10 years, suggests that the national charter school network's high performance is a result of having advantages over its public school counterparts.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2011
A hearing scheduled for Wednesday on proposed legislation aimed at helping KIPP charter schools remain in Baltimore has been rescheduled for next week as the organization continues negotiations with the Baltimore Teachers Union about how to pay its teachers for extended school days. According to Jason Botel, executive director of KIPP Baltimore, the union requested the postponement for one week in hopes of reaching a long-term agreement that would allow KIPP's rigorous model — which includes mandatory 9 1/2-hour school days, Saturday school and summer school — to be implemented in the city without violating the teachers' union contract.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green and Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | March 2, 2011
Mary Jefferson became the legal guardian of her granddaughter when the child was 2 years old to save her from a life of instability after her parents became addicted to drugs and ended up in jail. A decade later, Sonya Moss is excelling as a student at KIPP Ujima Village Academy, a public charter that is one of the highest-performing middle schools in Baltimore and the state. Jefferson credits the school's structure and support for helping the seventh-grader overcome her childhood obstacles and described KIPP "as a gift from God. " But the rare educational opportunities Sonya and other low-income students receive at the Northwest Baltimore school could come to an end this summer.
NEWS
By Baltimore Sun staff | February 11, 2011
President Barack Obama on Monday will visit Parkville Middle School and Center of Technology in Baltimore County, where he will discuss his 2012 budget priorities aimed at preparing students "to be competitive in the global economy," the White House announced Friday. U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan and Jack Lew, the White House budget director, will join the president at the school, which focuses on educating students in the subjects of science, technology, engineering and math, especially through hands-on projects.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2011
Five adults and one child were hospitalized for evaluation after a carbon monoxide leak Tuesday morning at Dickey Hill Elementary/Middle school, a Baltimore fire spokesman said. The evaluations were a precautionary measure, according to fire Capt. Roman Clark. "It doesn't appear to be anything life-threatening," he said. The source of the leak at the school, in West Baltimore's Wakefield neighborhood, was reported just after 8 a.m., identified by Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. crews and contained, Clark said.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2010
A 6-year-old special-needs student was in serious condition after he fell out of the back of a moving school bus Wednesday afternoon, city schools and Baltimore County police said Thursday. Baltimore County paramedics responded to the incident shortly after 3 p.m. Wednesday, where they found the injured boy after he fell off a bus that was taking him to his West Baltimore home from a Baltimore County special-education school. The student was taken to Johns Hopkins Hospital, where he remains in serious condition, according to Lt. Rob McCullough, spokesman for the Baltimore County Police Department.
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