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NEWS
April 4, 2014
I find it appalling that letter writer J. Robert Clark, a school bus driver, regards teachers as lazy for requesting respite from the inordinate number of make-up days that would be required this year to reach a magic 180 days ( "Waivers are for lazy teachers," March 29). As a parent of a city school student, my experience has been that teachers are extremely hardworking and dedicated to their students. My son's class sizes are usually 30 to 32 students. Teachers have multiple classes which means that when students go home their work continues with corrections of papers and preparation for the next day's classes.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jonathon Rondeau | September 4, 2014
Throughout the Baltimore City school year, student success will be measured in the traditional ways, through test scores and grades, and, for high school seniors, by whether or not they graduate. While tracking such standards is vital to understanding student achievement and progress as well as the success of our school system as a whole, another key indicator deserves far more focused attention: attendance. For students to succeed in school, they have to be in school. And not enough of Baltimore City students are attending school as much as they should.
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NEWS
August 27, 2013
As the dog days of summer give way to school buses and homework, kids and families had one last chance to play in the park with the abandonment of a summer day at the Back to School Summer Jam Aug. 24 at Granville Gude Park. The Earth, Wind and Fire Tribute Band gave a free concert and DJ Aggie, stage name of Laurel's James Agbai, executive director of Winning in Sports and Education, mixed music. Several young musicians displayed their vocal talent on the stage with help from Breasia Studios and 98.6 Sound.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
Hannah Sheats raises goats, makes clothes and bakes items with the 4-H to show at the Maryland State Fair. But the 11-year-old Parkton girl hasn't been to the State Fairgrounds in Timonium as much as she'd like since Baltimore County public schools opened Wednesday. Hannah, who attends Hereford Middle School, thinks she'd be learning more at the fair. "At school, in the first couple of weeks you don't do anything. It's kind of pointless," she said. "With 4-H, you always learn something new. You never stop.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2010
A crowd of about 800 Baltimore County school administrators gathered at Perry Hall High School on Friday to face a question from their boss. Superintendent Joe A. Hairston asked how they can continue "making the right things happen" for nearly 104,000 students. As he delivered the 11th opening address of his tenure as superintendent of the 173-school system, which has about 17,000 employees, he did not expect an answer. "The complete answer to that question is revealed only as our former students become adults — as we see who they become and what they achieve," said Hairston, who took over leadership of Maryland's third-largest school system in 2000, when this year's senior class began first grade.
EXPLORE
April 18, 2012
The school year for Baltimore County's public school students will end on Friday, June 8 -- four days earlier than originally scheduled, county schools announced today. The 2011-2012 school year had been scheduled to end Thursday, June 14. County schools were in a position to end school early this year because of the mild winter, which meant schools were not closed due to snow, and because the school system has effectively managed built-in emergency closing time. The schedule for the final days are as follows: • Wednesday, June 6: Assessment Day: High schools will close three hours early; teachers will remain on duty.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2011
As schools opened Tuesday in Anne Arundel County with a record 76,600 students, Bates Middle School sixth-grader Londell Owens said he's looking forward to learning much in his classes "and having fun doing it. " Among those who were in attendance at Bates on Tuesday morning were Superintendent Kevin Maxwell, several board of education members and interim state Superintendent Bernard Sadusky, who took over when long-time superintendent Nancy S....
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2012
Here's fair warning for students: Monday isn't just the first day of school in Baltimore City and the surrounding five counties, it's the beginning of life with a whole new set of expectations from teachers. There's going to be a lot more writing, more researching and more emphasis on being able to argue a point, even in math and science classes. And math classes will likely go more in-depth and cover less material. For the first time in a decade, what gets taught in classrooms across the state is shifting under a new set of standards for reading and math adopted by 45 states and the District of Columbia.
NEWS
May 13, 2013
Harford County's Board of Education on Monday named the system's current executive director of middle school performance to become the interim superintendent for the 2013-2014 school year. Barbara P. Canavan, who came to the county as an assistant teacher 40 years ago, will fill a vacancy being left by Robert M. Tomback, who is leaving the system at the end of June after a four-year term. Canavan first came to Harford County Public Schools in 1973. She taught at various middle schools in the county through 2010, when she took the middle school performance position, which included oversight of curriculum and instructional programming.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2014
Last year, the Common Core was debated by everyone from conservative talk show hosts to parents flooding state capitals, and teachers rebelled against a new evaluation system they believe is unfair. Now it's year two for the phase-in of controversial education reforms. And while students returning to Maryland classrooms this week may be blissfully unaware of the debate, they will see more changes. First, they can forget about the MSA (Maryland School Assessment) and learn the name for new state tests: PARCC, or Partnership for Assessment for Readiness for College and Careers.
NEWS
William Chin | August 27, 2014
This month more than 50 million American children will report to our public and elementary school systems to begin another school year, bringing with them not only new books, laptops, smartphones and iPads, but also their parents' hopes and dreams for a bright and healthy future. Unfortunately - and often all too tragically - a growing percentage of students enter or return to school without the most important back to school requirement: vaccinations. These students are part of a new generation vulnerable to childhood diseases that have long since been under control but are now making a comeback due to parental misinformation and bad science.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2014
Last year, the Common Core was debated by everyone from conservative talk show hosts to parents flooding state capitals, and teachers rebelled against a new evaluation system they believe is unfair. Now it's year two for the phase-in of controversial education reforms. And while students returning to Maryland classrooms this week may be blissfully unaware of the debate, they will see more changes. First, they can forget about the MSA (Maryland School Assessment) and learn the name for new state tests: PARCC, or Partnership for Assessment for Readiness for College and Careers.
NEWS
August 22, 2014
Event at Annapolis Elementary celebrates revitalized facility Along with anticipation for the new school year, students at Annapolis Elementary School have something extra to be excited about: new classrooms, new computers and, in many ways, a new school. Students, administration, and staff of Annapolis Elementary School will join Monday to mark the opening of the school after a $28.8 million renovation and expansion project. An open house and ribbon cutting will be held Monday from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Students will have an opportunity to tour the building, meet teachers, and see their new classrooms a day before classes begin — the school is opening one day later than most other AACPS facilities.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
Anne Arundel County public schools will launch a pilot program in the new school year giving some elementary school students instruction in specific themes, including global studies, arts and the humanities, and the use of science and technology in society. Superintendent George Arlotto said Thursday each of the nine elementary schools that feed into North County High School will take part in the program, dubbed Triple E: Enhancing Elementary Excellence. It will begin Sept. 29, about a month after Monday's start of the school year.
NEWS
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2014
On Friday morning, in the auditorium of Loch Raven High School, more than 300 school administrators closed their eyes for 30 seconds. Baltimore County schools Superintendent Dallas Dance had asked them to think about what could make schools "opportunity rich" for all students. "Those are the types of conversations we're going to have over the course of this year," Dance said in the school system's administrative and supervisory meeting to kick off the school year, which begins Aug. 25. The meeting for administrators and principals focused on equity, opportunity, engagement and relationships in county schools.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
OCEAN CITY - Squinting into the August sun at Ocean City's boardwalk Thursday, Comptroller Peter Franchot formally launched his petition drive to require Maryland schools to start after Labor Day. Franchot wants to deliver 10,000 signatures under the banner “Let Summer Be Summer” to Maryland lawmakers in January, when he will kick off lobbying for a new law that would forbid school districts from beginning classes before September. While the petition itself is symbolic, it continues the state comptroller's more than yearlong campaign to push back the first day of school.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2014
Most years, the last day of school comes with a sigh of relief, but this year what students and teachers describe is more akin to the body-draining feeling of finishing a marathon. "If I could frame it in one word I would just say 'exhausted,' " said Anna Gannon, a technology teacher at Gorman Crossing Elementary School in Howard County. "Whew. This has been the longest year ever," said Blair Todd, an eighth-grade history teacher at Charles Carroll Middle School in Prince George's County.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
Baltimore school officials are working to fill hundreds of teacher vacancies in the weeks before the school year starts, according to information presented to the school board Tuesday. With less than one month before the first day of school Aug. 25, the district was actively recruiting teachers to fill 211 vacancies. The high-need areas are in science, math, and special education. The city's number of vacancies far exceeds other area districts. In Baltimore County, which recently held a large job fair, officials reported 32 teacher vacancies, and Anne Arundel currently has 88. City school officials did not respond to inquiries about this year's vacancies.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and new schools CEO Gregory Thornton will kick off a listening tour around the city on Monday, as part of a back-to-school campaign scheduled throughout the month that will include hearing out parent concerns and expectations for the upcoming school year. The effort will kick off in Cherry Hill, where Rawlings-Blake and Thornton will begin canvassing the neighborhood, knocking on doors and listening to residents. The first education forum will be held at Cherry Hill Elementary/Middle School on Thursday, when the mayor and new schools chief will talk about progress and challenges and their plans for the new school year.
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