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NEWS
February 19, 2014
If city lawmakers "were shocked" by school violence, I'm shocked by our lawmakers ( "City Council plans hearings on violence directed at teachers," Feb. 18)! What rock do they live under? I'd heard rumblings about attacks on teachers, but I had no idea it was so prevalent in Baltimore. This is unacceptable. On a number of occasions, I've offered to volunteer at neighborhood schools but never had a reply. I felt badly at the time but now see why I wasn't wanted around. The Sun's report states during in the last fiscal year teachers filed "more than 300 workers' compensation claims … related to assaults or run-ins.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 19, 2014
It is time to get our heads out of the sand if we are going to have a serious conversation about the problem of violence against teachers in the classroom ( "Painful lessons," Feb. 16). For years, this has been a well-known fact. I have taught in Baltimore schools for 25 years. I am now retired but still work in a private school as a teacher. We can look back decades and see a pattern of suppression of the facts pertaining to violence toward teachers. Politicians and administrators are too concerned with their careers to be open and honest.
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NEWS
September 19, 2012
I must disagree with your editorial recommending that a better approach to the problem of children bringing guns to school would be having students alert authorities to troubling behavior by their peers ("Guns in schools," Sept. 16). It is the adults who must learn to interpret the warning signs given off by troubled youngsters before they lead to violence in the home and at school - parents, teachers, school counselors and staff. The adults are the ones who should be learning and working together more pro-actively.
NEWS
Luke Broadwater, Erica L. Green and Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2014
City lawmakers said Monday that they were shocked by newly published reports of school violence and plan to hold hearings to address the hundreds of injury claims filed by teachers. Mary Pat Clarke, chairwoman of the City Council's education committee and a former teacher, said she was taken aback by a Baltimore Sun investigation that included firsthand accounts of teachers who were assaulted in the city's schools. In the last fiscal year, more than 300 workers' compensation claims were related to assaults or run-ins with students, according to data obtained by The Sun. School employees suffer more injuries than those in any city agency except the Police Department, the data show.
NEWS
Luke Broadwater, Erica L. Green and Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2014
City lawmakers said Monday that they were shocked by newly published reports of school violence and plan to hold hearings to address the hundreds of injury claims filed by teachers. Mary Pat Clarke, chairwoman of the City Council's education committee and a former teacher, said she was taken aback by a Baltimore Sun investigation that included firsthand accounts of teachers who were assaulted in the city's schools. In the last fiscal year, more than 300 workers' compensation claims were related to assaults or run-ins with students, according to data obtained by The Sun. School employees suffer more injuries than those in any city agency except the Police Department, the data show.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2013
U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan told parents, students and educators in Baltimore County on Wednesday that while Americans might not agree on gun control legislation, they must work together so that children can grow up without fear of violence in schools. At a town hall-style meeting before a packed auditorium at Loch Raven High School, Duncan said communities must have tough conversations to address the violence that has hit schools across the country - including those in the county that hosted him Wednesday.
NEWS
November 23, 1994
The National League of Cities this month released a study weighted down with gloomy but not surprising news: Violence is a growing problem in U.S. public schools, practically shoving aside academics as the main concern of many school officials, teachers, parents and students.According to the NLC survey of 700 big cities and small towns throughout the United States, 40 percent of the respondents said school violence has climbed "significantly" during the past five years. In 70 percent of the surveyed communities, local police officers routinely patrol the schools.
NEWS
August 3, 1993
By creating a committee to study school violence, Carroll Superintendent R. Edward Shilling is tackling a subject too often swept under the rug. For many county residents, school violence occurs only in inner city schools, but the sad reality is that attacks on teachers and students are increasing in every school system. Weapons are also appearing in schools with greater frequency.School yard bullies and playground fights are not unique to this generation of students. But the character of the violence has changed.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2014
School districts across the nation will be able to apply for competitive grants to develop or update their school safety plans, U.S. Sen. Barbara Mikulski announced Wednesday in Baltimore County. The new Comprehensive School Safety Initiative will provide $50 million to school districts across the country who want to train and hire school personnel and buy equipment to improve school safety. Another $25 million will be used for research into analyzing the causes of school violence, including the gaps in mental health for students and their exposure to violence.
NEWS
Ruswv13@gmail.com | October 29, 2013
Recent tragic incidents of school violence continue to place the issues of bullying, cyber bullying and school safety at the top of nearly every education agenda around the country. Towson-area schools and organizations are establishing environments where kindness, wellness, and self-respect are pillars of their respective institutions. West Towson Elementary School has established a Character Crew comprising five fifth-grade students who work as a team to brainstorm and collaborate on ways to define and identify positive behavior traits and practices.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | June 2, 2013
"I know this sounds racist, but ... " So goes the subject line on last week's email from Bill, a reader. It seems Bill has an idea. Given that "all of the radical terrorists have been Muslims," he wants the government to mount a program to surveil every follower of Islam who immigrates to these shores. We are, claims reader Bill, "faced with a population who swears an oath to God to kill Americans -- not Canadians, not Mexicans, but Americans. " It is, he says, "time we protect ourselves.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2013
U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan told parents, students and educators in Baltimore County on Wednesday that while Americans might not agree on gun control legislation, they must work together so that children can grow up without fear of violence in schools. At a town hall-style meeting before a packed auditorium at Loch Raven High School, Duncan said communities must have tough conversations to address the violence that has hit schools across the country - including those in the county that hosted him Wednesday.
EXPLORE
Letter to The Aegis | December 20, 2012
Editor: Returning to another Monday morning at work after a horrifically violent attack. I will pray for my students and for my own strength as we try to learn in the midst of grieving for the loss of so many. Maybe diagraming sentences will occupy their minds or maybe we can get lost in a story. Teachers like me all across the country will pretend to our students that it isn't on our minds. We will close our classroom doors and think we will be safe; we want to believe we will be safe but we can't really think it. Not after Columbine.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | December 20, 2012
On Friday, in his moving and heartfelt statement in response to the horrific shooting in Newtown, Conn., President Barack Obama said, "As a country, we have been through this too many times. ... And we're going to have to come together and take meaningful action to prevent more tragedies like this, regardless of the politics. " There's just one problem: In a democracy, politics is a synonym for "democracy. " It is through politics that people with strong feelings and strong interests peaceably hash out their disagreements.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2012
Children clutching onto each other as they are hustled out of an elementary school. Parents weeping together in a school parking lot, police cars and ambulances flashing behind them. Police brandishing machine guns racing to a school. While the images from Friday's school shooting in Newtown, Conn., will haunt many, it is children - those who attend elementary schools much like the one where 20 students and six adults were killed - who may be the most profoundly affected, experts say. "Children are going to be shaken by this because it was at a school, a place that is supposed to be safe and comforting," said Dr. Patrick Kelly, a psychiatrist at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center.
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