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NEWS
By Harold Jackson | December 20, 1998
MY WIFE says I hate to be wrong. But I know that I'm not always right. People who have read this column know it, too. If I had my way, this single declaration of fallibility would serve as apology for errors, past, present and hence. Any future mea culpa would be understood without being said. Unfortunately, it doesn't work that way.Errors not admitted too often become errors not corrected. Take the Howard County school tuition waiver policy. A flaw in it should be corrected, but won't be unless the Board of Education admits its mistake.
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NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2014
The Baltimore school board is considering a more than 20 percent tuition increase next year for students who are not residents, which would make the city's rates higher than Baltimore County's and competitive with some Catholic programs. Officials have proposed raising tuition for middle and high school students to $7,500. Elementary-age students would pay $7,000. Currently, the district charges $5,900 for middle/high school tuition and $5,670 for elementary tuition. School officials said the increase would make its tuition rates, currently among the lowest in the state, more competitive.
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BUSINESS
March 31, 1999
Members of the Maryland Association of Certified Public Accountants are answering readers' tax questions through April 15.My employer pays private school tuition for my child as part of my benefits package. It is not reported on my W-2. Is this taxable? If so, how do I report it?The private school tuition is taxable as compensation. Your employer should issue an amended W-2, including the tuition as additional compensation. Otherwise the amount should be reported as other income on Line 21 of Form 1040, as well as on Line 2 of Schedule SE.Gabriel Massuda, CPA, Reznick, Fedder & SilvermanThe above advice is for general purposes only and is not intended as legal, accounting or tax advice.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | March 7, 2014
A New Jersey high school senior, who claims she was kicked out of the house but whose parents claim she left rather than abide by their rules, has filed suit against them demanding financial support. Rachel Canning, who is now 18, moved in with a friend in October. She is asking a judge to require her parents to pay more than $650 a week in support, to pay the remainder due on her Catholic high school tuition and to give her access to a college fund they have for her. In addition, she wants them pay $12,000 in attorney's fees to the father of the friend she now lives with, who filed the suit on her behalf.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Sun Staff Writer | May 24, 1995
In a break with state education policy, Baltimore County schools will continue to give standardized tests to third-, fifth- and eighth-grade students next year.Beginning in the 1996-97 school year, county schools will give the tests in second, fourth and sixth grades, administrators told the county school board at a meeting last night.The state Department of Education, seeking to reduce the amount of testing, announced recently that those standardized tests, the California Test of Basic Skills, would not be required next year.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2014
The Baltimore school board is considering a more than 20 percent tuition increase next year for students who are not residents, which would make the city's rates higher than Baltimore County's and competitive with some Catholic programs. Officials have proposed raising tuition for middle and high school students to $7,500. Elementary-age students would pay $7,000. Currently, the district charges $5,900 for middle/high school tuition and $5,670 for elementary tuition. School officials said the increase would make its tuition rates, currently among the lowest in the state, more competitive.
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN STAFF | September 8, 1996
"Divorce the Baltimore County Public Schools," bellowed the RTC billboard that parents erected on Liberty Heights Avenue last month, summoning residents to yesterday's meeting at Maximum Life Christian Church.It was a signal that a group of African-American parents, known as the Education Coalition of Organizations, had reached the breaking point in its effort to reduce the 30-point gap in test scores between black students and their peers in other ethnic groups.Yesterday in Woodlawn, there was talk among the 30 parents and educators of forming a private school based on African ideals, charter schools -- independent schools run with public money -- and promoting taxpayer-financed vouchers for private school tuition.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 14, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Refusing to end the spreading confusion over the constitutionality of school vouchers, the Supreme Court turned aside yesterday a plea by parochial school students and parents in Vermont seeking equal access to tuition aid.Within the past 13 months, the court has refused to hear four separate cases on public support for parochial school tuition. Those actions have come amid a rising number of conflicting rulings on the issue by lower courts.The action yesterday on the Vermont case stressed anew that the justices are mainly willing to let the issue be decided state by state.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 24, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Seeking an election-year agenda on education, Republicans are pushing a bill that would allow parents to set aside money in tax-deferred college savings accounts for elementary and secondary school costs, including private school tuition.A key procedural vote is set for today on the Senate measure, which would allow parents to deposit money for tuition, books, tutors and other expenses and shield the income it generates from taxes. If the legislation can surmount that hurdle, political observers say, it has a good chance of gaining congressional approval, although President Clinton is likely to veto it.Both sides acknowledge that the importance of the tuition proposal is largely symbolic.
NEWS
By E. L. STERNBERG | May 24, 1992
Rutland, Vt. -- "No negotiation -- there is no negotiation!" A woman in business suit and silky blouse lets her harsh words sink in to the crowd gathered to hear her in a school gymnasium. But this isn't a seminar about how to deal with hostage-takers or with union leaders during a strike or even with used car salesmen. She's talking about school tuition to a group of parents at a Catholic school.The women is Sister Patricia Houlihan, R.S.M. She advocates a system that abolishes fixed tuitions and lets parents set what they think is the appropriate amount to pay. She is speaking at Christ the King, a parochial elementary school in Rutland.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, Liz Bowie and Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2014
- Newly named to head Baltimore's public schools, Gregory E. Thornton has unfinished business in the district he is leaving behind after 31/2 tumultuous years. Wearing a red T-shirt, he arrived Friday at a school where, to peals of laughter, the 59-year-old would join kids in a "jump rope-a-thon. " But, as so frequently happened during his tenure, there were political hoops to jump through first. "How are we doing?" Thornton asked a state senator he spied in the welcoming crowd.
NEWS
November 26, 2012
The Baltimore City Police Department employs more people than any other department of city government, yet most of its officers live outside the city. Many residents like the idea of police officers living in their communities because they view them as a deterrent to crime and because they believe officers would have a better understanding of neighborhood problems if they had homes in the area. But if Baltimore hopes to encourage more officers to live where they work, it must develop more effective strategies for getting and keeping them here.
NEWS
By LIZ F. KAY and LIZ F. KAY,SUN REPORTER | April 8, 2006
Although tuition will stay the same, students at Maryland's public university campuses will pay up to 8 percent more for housing next year. The university system's Board of Regents approved charges for room, board, parking and other services at its meeting yesterday at the University of Baltimore. Charges for room and board will go up at all but one of the state campuses that offer housing. There will be no increase at Bowie State. The housing increases vary depending on the campus and the type of room.
NEWS
By William Wan and William Wan,SUN STAFF | January 28, 2005
It was the low tuition that persuaded Alex Nowodazkij to enroll at Howard Community College in Columbia. But for the past three years, the cost of attending HCC and other community colleges statewide has shot up, leaving Nowodazkij and other students scrambling to pay for their education. HCC announced this week that tuition for 2005-2006 would increase again, by $5 a credit. Other community colleges are contemplating similar action as they prepare next year's budgets. "Some of the students work two jobs to make a living," said Nowodazkij, 21, president of the student body.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | January 27, 2005
The Board of Regents approved tuition increases averaging 5.8 percent yesterday for University System of Maryland campuses, the lowest rise in three years. The increases for the 2005-2006 academic year mean annual undergraduate tuition and fees for in-state students will range from $8,520 at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County to $4,714 at Coppin State University. System officials had raised tuition by nearly 30 percent during the previous two years, when the schools received no increase in state aid. Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. included an extra $43 million in state general funds for the system in his budget for next year, which he submitted to the General Assembly last week.
NEWS
April 8, 2000
Shorting public schools I read with utter disgust that the state House and Senate passed bills granting $6 million in state funding to private schools to purchase books ("Aid to private schools passes on close vote," March 24). I have two children, an 11-year-old daughter and a 6-year-old son. My daughter attends Edgewood Middle School, a Harford County public school, and my son attends Harford Day School, a private school. My daughter has a math book that is more than five years old. She doesn't have any other textbooks that she can use outside of school because the school does not have enough books for each student.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Sun Staff Writer | November 4, 1994
Glenelg High School teacher James P. Mundy would rather not spend class time coordinating fund-raising efforts, but he says it's necessary if his school is to have enough computers to teach students technological skills for the future.That's just one reason the Democratic state Senate candidate says funneling taxpayers' money to private schools through tax credits or other schemes is "irresponsible" and a "knee-jerk reaction" to the public schools' problems."To take away money from public schools to subsidize private schools -- to teach the best and forget the rest -- is not only ethically, but fiscally, irresponsible," said Mr. Mundy, a former Howard teachers union president.
NEWS
November 26, 2012
The Baltimore City Police Department employs more people than any other department of city government, yet most of its officers live outside the city. Many residents like the idea of police officers living in their communities because they view them as a deterrent to crime and because they believe officers would have a better understanding of neighborhood problems if they had homes in the area. But if Baltimore hopes to encourage more officers to live where they work, it must develop more effective strategies for getting and keeping them here.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 14, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Refusing to end the spreading confusion over the constitutionality of school vouchers, the Supreme Court turned aside yesterday a plea by parochial school students and parents in Vermont seeking equal access to tuition aid.Within the past 13 months, the court has refused to hear four separate cases on public support for parochial school tuition. Those actions have come amid a rising number of conflicting rulings on the issue by lower courts.The action yesterday on the Vermont case stressed anew that the justices are mainly willing to let the issue be decided state by state.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | November 16, 1999
WILL THE LAST family to leave public schools please turn out the lights?It is the election season, and this campaign's list of hollow promises is topped by pledges from the candidates to improve public schools or give parents the money to go elsewhere.In 1992, it was the economy, stupid. This time around, it is education, stupid. The economy is robust, so the presidential candidates are looking for that other tender spot on the psyche of the American voter. If it isn't the paycheck, it has got to be the kids.
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