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By Karen Brandon and Karen Brandon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 18, 2003
ENCINITAS, Calif. - The yellow school bus is emerging as a casualty of budget crises in states and school districts across the nation. Cash-strapped districts throughout California are likely to eliminate bus service to neighborhood schools next year, and several states and districts, including some in Illinois, are taking similar steps to cut school bus routes. Ana Rebollo and Blanca Fitz, standing with their elementary school-age daughters at a bus stop in Encinitas, north of San Diego, wondered how their children and others in the neighborhood will get to and from school next year, when the school bus no longer is an option.
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NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2012
Now that the governor's proposal to expand gambling in Maryland has passed at the ballot box, some state senators and delegates who backed the controversial measure are looking to collect. Call it casino capital. Those who stuck out their necks for Gov. Martin O'Malley and the General Assembly's presiding officers would like to bring home something to show for it. Baltimore wants to increase the school system's credit limit so it can renovate buildings, and the city's delegation in Annapolis is hoping to deliver.
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NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Sheridan Lyons and Jennifer McMenamin and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | March 9, 2002
Stella N. Tsourakis, the Carroll school bus driver who was embroiled in a dispute for leading her middle school passengers in a recitation of the Lord's Prayer for the victims of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, has been told she cannot drive for the county any longer. Tsourakis has been decertified -- effectively firing her by revoking her permission to drive a school bus for the county -- by Carroll school officials, who say they are concerned about the safety of her passengers. She is still employed by Schaffer's Mulch and Bus Co. near Westminster and will continue to drive for it on private charter runs.
NEWS
By Robert Maranto and Dirk C. van Raemdonck | October 22, 2012
As the presidential election counts down to (despite recent tightening in the polls) a likely Obama victory, even moderate Republicans despair that America is going the way of "social democratic" Western Europe, with a smaller private sector, more power in the hands of political and technocratic elites, and unlimited government. For their part, liberals cheer that America will finally catch up with the more "advanced" lands across the Atlantic. The fears of the right and hopes of the left reflect popular misconceptions about European realities.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | March 18, 1993
Baltimore County schoolchildren may one day be able to cross the street as children in every other Maryland county do -- under the protection of their school bus's flashing red lights.The county's Senate delegation to the General Assembly has overwhelmingly approved a local bill to end the county's practice of requiring students to cross the street before their bus arrives in the morning and after it pulls away in the afternoon.If the House delegation also approves the legislation, the full General Assembly would likely pass the bill as a local courtesy.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2011
Baltimore City Council members called Thursday for strengthened policies and supervision of school transportation for special-needs students — a discussion spurred by the death of a 6-year-old who fell from the back of a moving school bus last month. In a hearing called by the council's education committee, experts and parents also criticized school bus practices and procedures as insufficient in meeting the needs of special-education students, who make up the majority of students carried by city-owned and -contracted yellow school buses.
NEWS
January 19, 1994
Harford County's shopping list for this year's General Assembly is a short one, after its productive trip to the state legislature last year. Schools, taxes, and crime and punishment are chief concerns for the county delegation, all of whose members are focused on the fall elections.Election year posturing is likely to dominate this current session's activity. No one expects, or dares to propose, any measures that will raise major taxes or throw the budget out of kilter. "I think it's going to be a caretaker session," bluntly predicts Del. David R. Craig of Havre de Grace.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,STAFF WRITER | December 17, 1998
Some parents in a Severna Park community, worried that their children might be hit by a car as they walk to school along busy Jones Station Road, are demanding that the school officials build a sidewalk or provide a bus."The only thing that separates the children from the road is a single white line on the pavement," said Luanne Kerrigan, whose first-grader attends Jones-Oakhill Elementary School."There is no curb, no nothing, nothing to stop a car from hitting a child."Starting next month, Kerrigan's son and five other children will have to walk to Jones Elementary School on Hoyle Lane from their homes on Snellings Court.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | November 8, 1992
No matter what the wording, the news from the state about school funding will be bad, says R. Edward Shilling, superintendent of Carroll County schools.The latest talk is of eliminating state money for school transportation, which would result in a loss of about $3.2 million for Carroll schools, Mr. Shilling has told the school board.More than 91 percent of Carroll students ride buses, and the county spends $8 million a year to provide that service.Slashing transportation is the third course of action proposed since September, when the governor unveiled his plan to cut $150 million from county aid and let regional officials apportion the losses among their departments.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2001
Acting on the recommendations of government and education specialists, the Carroll commissioners asked an oversight committee yesterday to analyze the school system's $13.1 million transportation budget. "I have a lot of questions about that area and how it's being run," said Commissioner Robin Bartlett Frazier. "Maybe we can figure out how to make it more efficient." According to a report prepared by KPMG Consulting and presented to the commissioners and school board last week, the Carroll school system spends more per pupil on transportation than neighboring counties.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2011
Baltimore City Council members called Thursday for strengthened policies and supervision of school transportation for special-needs students — a discussion spurred by the death of a 6-year-old who fell from the back of a moving school bus last month. In a hearing called by the council's education committee, experts and parents also criticized school bus practices and procedures as insufficient in meeting the needs of special-education students, who make up the majority of students carried by city-owned and -contracted yellow school buses.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,Sun reporter | August 10, 2008
Fuel costs and a shortage of certified drivers will make this a trying year for transportation providers and the Howard County school system. Soaring diesel prices have resulted in an $800,000 shortfall for the school system's Department of Transportation. As a result, the number of buses will be cut and buses will run longer routes with more students. Fuel prices are higher than the school system had projected last year when the Howard County Board of Education approved its budget. In September, diesel fuel cost $3.038 a gallon.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun reporter | November 2, 2007
The yellow buses hauling Maryland's suburban and rural students to public school are going 25 percent farther than they did 15 years ago and at more than twice the cost, according to an anti-sprawl group, which contends that poorly planned development is partly to blame. In a report released yesterday, 1000 Friends of Maryland says bus fleets in the state's counties traveled more than 117 million miles last year, with some counties experiencing increases in overall mileage of 30 percent to 50 percent since 1992.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | May 29, 2004
Vallen Luther Emery Sr., a retired city public schools transportation manager for disabled children who helped found a Northwest Baltimore church, died Monday of complications of cancer and heart failure at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Ashburton resident was 80. Born in Vacherie, La., and educated in New Orleans, Mr. Emery enrolled in Tuskegee Institute in 1941. He interrupted his studies to serve in the Army in the Pacific during World War II, serving as a staff sergeant in the medical corps.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | March 3, 2004
The transportation chief for the Baltimore school system is being abruptly transferred in the midst of a state investigation and widespread complaints from school bus contractors. Valencia Baker, who had headed the transportation unit for more than two years, is being replaced Monday by Francis Aning, a longtime employee of the same agency, school officials confirmed. Vanessa Pyatt, a spokeswoman for the school system, said Baker was being reassigned to the special-education unit, where she previously worked.
NEWS
By Karen Brandon and Karen Brandon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 18, 2003
ENCINITAS, Calif. - The yellow school bus is emerging as a casualty of budget crises in states and school districts across the nation. Cash-strapped districts throughout California are likely to eliminate bus service to neighborhood schools next year, and several states and districts, including some in Illinois, are taking similar steps to cut school bus routes. Ana Rebollo and Blanca Fitz, standing with their elementary school-age daughters at a bus stop in Encinitas, north of San Diego, wondered how their children and others in the neighborhood will get to and from school next year, when the school bus no longer is an option.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Childs Walker and Sheridan Lyons and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | December 13, 2001
Stella Tsourakis thought she was helping when she led a busload of Carroll County middle school pupils in the Lord's Prayer on Sept. 12, the morning after hijacked airplanes crashed into the Pentagon and the World Trade Center. Now, Tsourakis, a driver, is afraid she'll lose her new job because the Hampstead-area children attending Shiloh Middle School - now joined by those attending North Carroll High School - will not stop praying before they get off the bus at school. Tsourakis was told by a school transportation official Nov. 16 to stop leading the prayers or she could lose her job. Tsourakis said she stopped.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | January 18, 2000
A new system for pedestrian, car and bus traffic at Taneytown Elementary School will begin Thursday and may reduce dangers that prompted parents to ask the City Council for a crossing guard in November. The Taneytown City Council decided against hiring a crossing guard for Kings Drive in front of the school because county school transportation officials developed a plan that would keep most pedestrian traffic separate from vehicles, said Mayor Henry C. Heine. "We'll dismiss the walkers first," said James Doolan, supervisor of transportation for Carroll County schools.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | February 23, 2003
When the buzzer sounds on his clock radio at 3:30 Tuesday morning, Charley Taibi doesn't even think about five minutes' more sleep. There's no time. His feet hit the floor and the first thing he does is look out the window, across the pond toward his neighbor's home in the Todd Lakes development. He's a bit nervous. He doesn't like what he sees and immediately dials 410-838-6600 - the Harford County Sheriff's Office. He is not reporting a suspicious character in the neighborhood. Taibi is one of four supervisors with the Harford County public schools' transportation department, and it's his day to get up early and start the process of gathering information that will determine whether schools are delayed or closed by inclement weather.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2002
GAITHERSBURG - Republican Gov.-elect Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. reached out to Maryland's largest Democratic stronghold yesterday, promising a partnership to back such common interests as local education funding and a long-stalled highway project. Speaking to a breakfast audience of about 350 Montgomery County community leaders, Ehrlich and Lt. Gov.-elect Michael S. Steele pledged full funding for the Thornton Plan to increase education spending and delighted in the County Council's vote Tuesday to reverse its long-held position and support a study of the east-west Intercounty Connector.
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