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By Baltimore Sun reporter | March 16, 2010
Transparency should be the rule, especially with organizations supported by public funds. It seems as if the officials and governing body of the Baltimore City Public Schools raised the draw bridge without granting public access regarding the obvious and odorous actions of a principal who was pressuring Filipino teachers to purchase Mary Kay cosmetics ("School system defends response," March 16). Who will watch the watchers? McNair Taylor, Baltimore
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NEWS
October 4, 2014
State lawmakers and educators are right to be concerned about how much time it presently takes to clear or dismiss teachers accused of misconduct. When teachers are yanked out of their classrooms for months or even years while allegations of wrongdoing are investigated, both they and their students suffer from the absence. Maryland's school districts need to expedite the process by which such cases are resolved, but they must do so in a way that is fair to teachers while protecting the vulnerable young people entrusted to their care.
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EXPLORE
August 24, 2012
I was sorry to read of Mamie Perkins' retirement from the Howard County Public Schools. She proved her ability when she was deputy superintendent during the absence of Sydney Cousin. I heard no complaints about her leadership, ability or loyalty to the educational system of Howard County. In reading the article ("Deputy superintendent retires from school system," Aug. 9), I was amazed that a person with her experience (39 years) was not promoted to the position of superintendent and feel that Howard County lost an extremely qualified leader.
NEWS
By Joe Burris and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
Over and again, Freeman A. Hrabowski called Howard County's African-American community fortunate to be living in "the richest county in the richest state in the richest country in the world. " Speaking at a "parent empowerment and engagement forum" in Columbia this week, the president of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County then implored African-American parents to seize opportunities and resources within the county to help their children succeed. "A lot of people would like to live in Howard County," Hrabowski said.
EXPLORE
May 6, 2013
The Board of Education of Harford County is seeking applications from interested county citizens to fill one opening on the school system's Audit Committee. The purpose of the five-member committee is to assist the board in fulfilling its fiduciary oversight responsibilities. The committee serves as an independent and objective party to monitor the school system's financial reporting process and internal controls. The committee meets at least quarterly to review financial performance and may meet annually, in separate sessions, with management, the internal auditor and the external auditor.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2010
Principal Rhonda Richetta can vividly recall days when students have come to her office door at City Springs School gasping for air. The school has a large population of asthmatic elementary- and middle-school-age students who receive critical services — including daily breathing treatments — from a nurse practitioner in its health center. Richetta fears that could change next year if the school is one of six that are slated to reduce their health care services because of proposed funding cuts from the city.
EXPLORE
June 4, 2012
As Dr. Cousin's duty as school superintendent comes to a close, I wanted to recognize his leadership over the past eight years. Dr. Cousin has always had a commitment to continuous improvement for central and building administration. His clear and explicit goals have increased student achievement across the county. What stands out the most to me is Dr. Cousin's belief that all students can achieve under the right conditions. His leadership has provided adequate support services to make schools an overall learning environment for both students and employees.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
Anne Arundel County public schools will launch a pilot program in the new school year giving some elementary school students instruction in specific themes, including global studies, arts and the humanities, and the use of science and technology in society. Superintendent George Arlotto said Thursday each of the nine elementary schools that feed into North County High School will take part in the program, dubbed Triple E: Enhancing Elementary Excellence. It will begin Sept. 29, about a month after Monday's start of the school year.
EXPLORE
Editorial from The Aegis | June 13, 2013
Harford County Public Schools leadership has left the realm of reality as it applies to budget management. The decision that no doubt will be getting the most attention in the coming weeks is a recommendation by the administration, and approved by the board of education, to levy fees against students who participate in after school programs ranging from athletics to band to yearbook. This is a terrible idea, and one that could well result in less money being collected through extracurricular activities than comes in at present.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2012
The Baltimore County school board Tuesday night voted to approve numerous retirements and resignations, including those of two employees who signed contracts with the former superintendent that a union official and others have questioned. But the board did not discuss in public the fact that those two employees had negotiated a settlement and will be paid more than $150,000 total. The Sun reported last month that Baltimore County school Superintendent Joe A. Hairston had given two top aides employment contracts that promised them severance of almost a half-million dollars if they were fired when the new superintendent chose his own leadership team.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
A limit should be set on the time it takes to clear or dismiss a teacher accused of misconduct so that employees do not remain out of their schools for months and even years, legislators and education advocates said this week. While two legislators suggested action by the General Assembly, an education advocate said some agreement could be reached between unions and school systems on how to expedite a process that is expensive to taxpayers and detrimental to children whose classrooms are staffed by substitutes.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
While Baltimore County officials were deciding whether Michael Williams was fit to continue teaching, he was assigned to a dusty, windowless room at a Pulaski Highway warehouse that held old textbooks, surplus computers and other materials. He, along with a dozen or so employees, sat at a long table reading detective novels and playing Trivial Pursuit. Sometimes they would fall asleep until supervisors, watching from a security camera, came in to wake them up. Williams, who had been accused of touching a girl on the cheek with a yardstick, was paid his full salary plus benefits for more than a year to show up at the warehouse when school was in session.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell and The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2014
When Baltimore city schools and the Maryland Stadium Authority adopted a plan to update the city's aging school buildings in January 2013, they hoped to rebuild or restore 30 to 35 schools in the first phase of renovations. But studies to identify the schools' needs determined that the $977 million in bond funding the system expects to receive would cover only 23 to 28 schools. The city school commissioners at their board meeting Tuesday night reviewed a hotly contested recommendation to defer renovations to some of Baltimore's most dilapidated schools because they would be the costliest to renovate.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Colin Campbell and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
The chief financial officer of Prince George's County public schools and his wife resigned Monday, after the Maryland Insurance Administration found that the couple committed fraud on their personal insurance. The school system is also ordering "external independent auditors to confirm there are no improprieties" relating to its $1.8 million budget, according to a statement issued by board chairman Segun Eubanks and schools chief executive Kevin Maxwell. The Baltimore Sun informed school officials Friday of the insurance agency's findings that chief financial officer Colby White, and his wife, Keisha White, an auditor for the schools, knowingly submitted false information to an insurance company last year in an attempt to receive payment for a lost diamond ring that another insurer had covered six months earlier.
NEWS
Doug Donovan and The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2014
Buying a diamond ring is always a costly expense. Claiming to lose it — twice — came at an even steeper price for Colby White, chief financial officer for Prince George's County public schools. The Maryland Insurance Administration has ruled White and his wife, Keisha, who works as an internal auditor for the school system, committed insurance fraud by filing a claim for a lost diamond ring that another insurer had already paid $16,313 to replace months earlier. The agency said the couple "knowingly violated" Maryland insurance law in filing two claims for the same loss.
NEWS
By Francois Furstenberg | September 9, 2014
On behalf of Baltimore's stakeholders, I want to express my thanks to Gregory E. Thornton, the new chief executive officer of Baltimore City Public Schools, for his inspiring words (" Much work to be done ," Aug. 25). In case you're wondering, the stake I hold is a house I recently bought in East Baltimore. It's a big row house, built in 1875, so I don't exactly hold it - really it holds me - but I guess that part isn't so important. Let me get to the point: CEO Thornton tells us he will run the city schools like a business.
EXPLORE
Letter to The Aegis | August 6, 2013
Editor: As you probably have noticed, the subject of education funding in Harford County has been a hot topic of late. And with good reason, since the education of our children and grandchildren is one of the most consequential responsibilities we have as a society. Sadly, there has been a great deal of confusion regarding how education is funded and administered in the state of Maryland, which itself is a situation that needs drastic change. In Maryland, local Boards of Education are independent bodies created by the state to administer local public education.
EXPLORE
February 12, 2013
As Carroll County's largest employer, Carroll County Public Schools should be considered a good investment, according to Superintendent Steve Guthriet. During a Tuesday, Feb. 5, budget hearing and forum, one of several scheduled to be held around the county, Guthrie outlined the various issues facing the school system and stressed that the system was an excellent investment. "It is valuable to Carroll County as an entity," Guthrie said to the 75 people gathered in South Carroll High School's auditorium for the evening session.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2014
North Carroll Middle School was flooded with phone calls Tuesday after an erroneous news report that a student had shot and killed herself inside the Hampstead school. A 13-year-old girl at North Carroll Middle had committed suicide off school grounds, and school officials said teachers and counselors were talking to students about the loss of a fellow student during morning classes. Dana Falls, director of student services for Carroll County Public Schools, said that shortly after noon, the school received a flood of calls from parents worried about the reports of violence.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
George Arlotto this week became the third Anne Arundel County superintendent in as many years submitting a capital budget proposal - but he said working within the school system for 10 years helped him hammer out the $163.4 million request. "Not a lot of changes were made, based on what we've done in the past and where we're headed in the future," said Arlotto, who was the system's chief of staff before becoming superintendent in July. Arlotto replaced Mamie Perkins, who served as an interim superintendent for a year while the school district sought a permanent replacement for seven-year Superintendent Kevin Maxwell.
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