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NEWS
November 19, 2013
Teachers and administrators do not like suspending students. It is always a balancing act trying to weigh the interests of the larger student body vs. that of the individual student ( "The folly of pre-K suspensions," Nov. 12). That said, criticism of suspensions with no mention of funding "in-school" interventions represents the height of hypocrisy. Most of the children involved in violent behaviors need love and support, which will rarely be found in a suspension. Schools need to create internal programs and alternative curricula for many, many of these children, but there is no money to do so. Thus, schools are left with one tool to deal with highly-disruptive, often violent students: suspension.
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NEWS
By Jane Sundius | January 9, 2014
The nation's top cop and principal visited Frederick Douglass High School in Baltimore this week, but not for reasons you think. U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder and U.S. Department of Education Secretary Arne Duncan visited Douglass to release federal recommendations on school discipline policies that aim to lower out of school suspensions and ensure that they are no longer handed out to children of color at rates that are double or triple the...
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NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Sun Staff Writer | October 26, 1994
Black males in Baltimore County middle and high schools were suspended at twice the rate of white males last school year, according to statistics presented to the county school board last night.During the 1993-1994 school year, nearly one-third of the black males in the county's secondary schools were suspended for a variety of offenses compared with only 15 percent of white males, said Jessie Douglas, the school system's ombudsman who presented the report.Black students make up about 25 percent of county enrollment.
NEWS
November 19, 2013
Teachers and administrators do not like suspending students. It is always a balancing act trying to weigh the interests of the larger student body vs. that of the individual student ( "The folly of pre-K suspensions," Nov. 12). That said, criticism of suspensions with no mention of funding "in-school" interventions represents the height of hypocrisy. Most of the children involved in violent behaviors need love and support, which will rarely be found in a suspension. Schools need to create internal programs and alternative curricula for many, many of these children, but there is no money to do so. Thus, schools are left with one tool to deal with highly-disruptive, often violent students: suspension.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff writer | January 30, 1991
The number of students suspended for various infractions at Carroll's five high schools in 1989-1990 is down 32 percent from the year before, and educators attribute the fall to the Saturday School and other programs.Total suspensions for all Carroll high school students dropped from 1,916 during the 1988-1989 school year to 1,348 in 1989-1990, said Edwin Davis, director of pupil services and special programs.Reasons for suspensions include truancy, class-cutting, fighting, smoking, drug and alcohol possession, and insubordination.
NEWS
By Gregory P. Kane | December 8, 1994
BLACK MIDDLE and high school students in Baltimore County get suspended at a rate twice that of their white counterparts, a recent report in The Evening Sun noted. Who's ** to blame?There's enough guilt to go around for all parties to get a plate full and then go back for seconds. A number of factors and people contribute to the disproportionate suspension rate for black students.While the charge of "white racism" has recently become, in some cases, the first refuge of the scoundrel, it may play a part in the suspension rate of black students.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff writer | September 11, 1991
More students drew more suspensions from county high schools last year than in either of the two previous school years, despite school officials' efforts to use alternatives that will keep students at theirbooks.A report that traces high school suspensions for the last three school years shows that the effort to substitute in-school alternatives "is not working," said Dana F. Hanna, school board vice chairman. "(The report) addresses the fact that we are not achieving the goal, so we've got to deal with it more intensely."
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2013
A state senator told colleagues Wednesday that a bill to prohibit school systems from suspending children who make gun gestures or have objects that look like a gun is needed because "this has gotten out of hand. " Sen. J.B. Jennings filed his bill after the recent two-day suspension of 7-year-old Joshua Welch at Park Elementary School in Anne Arundel County for nibbling a pastry into what a teacher believed was a shape of a gun. B.J. Welch, the boy's father, was in Annapolis to testify in support of Jennings' bill before the Senate Education, Health and Environmental Affairs Committee.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | September 20, 2001
In the behavior department, Howard County students did a flip-flop last school year. The number of suspensions in middle schools increased while suspensions in elementary and high schools declined, according to a report that will be presented to the Board of Education tonight. That's the opposite of the previous school year, when middle school incidents dropped and the county's older and younger children were suspended more often. What gives? "The numbers go up and down every year," said Alice Haskins, the system's director of middle schools.
NEWS
September 27, 1993
The following are highlights of student suspension statistics presented to the Howard County Board of Education earlier this month:* The total number of suspensions at all grade levels decreased slightly to 1,049 students in the 1992-93 school year, down from 1,056 in the 1991-92 school year.* Forty-six elementary school students were suspended in the 1992-93 school year. That compares with 66 elementary school students who were suspended the previous school year.* Middle school suspensions rose to 427 students last year, up from 359 the previous school year.
NEWS
November 12, 2013
For years, the Maryland Department of Education has been urging the state's school systems to reduce the number of out-of-school suspensions teachers and principals use to discipline disruptive or troublesome students. Under new guidelines issued last year, state school Superintendent Lillian M. Lowery asked educators to reserve suspension as a punishment of last resort to be used only after every other alternative had been exhausted. Kicking kids out of school rarely solves anything, because when those youngsters return, whatever it was that originally caused their bad behavior is likely to come right back with them.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2013
A state senator told colleagues Wednesday that a bill to prohibit school systems from suspending children who make gun gestures or have objects that look like a gun is needed because "this has gotten out of hand. " Sen. J.B. Jennings filed his bill after the recent two-day suspension of 7-year-old Joshua Welch at Park Elementary School in Anne Arundel County for nibbling a pastry into what a teacher believed was a shape of a gun. B.J. Welch, the boy's father, was in Annapolis to testify in support of Jennings' bill before the Senate Education, Health and Environmental Affairs Committee.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2010
A former cafeteria manager at Frederick Douglass High School is suing the city school system for $300,000, saying that officials denied her due-process rights during an investigation into whether she and another employee had stolen funds from the school. According to the attorney for Bessie Miller, a 12-year veteran of the system, school officials decided to suspend her without pay and threatened her with termination after a $995 discrepancy arose in the school cafeteria's deposits.
NEWS
By Anne Townsend | April 12, 2010
As the executive director of a nonprofit education organization, I have taught anti-bullying workshops for 10 years, but I am still shocked by the tragedies that are a direct result of bullying. Recently, I was shaken by what happened to one particular bullying victim. In January, 15-year-old Phoebe Prince hanged herself in a stairwell of her family's home in South Hadley, Mass. According to officials, Phoebe, a high school freshman, was brutally bullied for months before she killed herself.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie , liz.bowie@baltsun.com | December 11, 2009
The Maryland state school board is beginning a major review of statewide policies on long-term suspensions and expulsions after concerns over a case involving a student who was suspended for nearly an entire school year without being given any access to public education. In reviewing the Dorchester County case earlier this year, the state board decided it was deeply concerned by the failure to provide some education to a student during the suspension. The review comes after the Baltimore school board adopted a hard-line policy giving its CEO the right to permanently expel a student.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | July 1, 2009
Maryland public school officials can no longer suspend or expel students solely for being chronically late or absent under a new state law that takes effect today. The legislation follows a long trend of rising suspensions in Maryland, which resulted from zero-tolerance policies imposed amid increasing violence in communities and high-profile shootings such as that at Columbine High School in 1999. More than 16,500 students were suspended statewide in the 2007-2008 academic year for attendance-related reasons, nearly 10 percent of the total, according to the Maryland State Department of Education.
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Staff Writer | September 10, 1993
The Howard County school board approved exterior renovation plans for Wilde Lake High School yesterday, calling for demolition of nearly everything to modernize the 22-year-old building.Only Wilde Lake's gymnasium would remain in the nearly $20 million, two-year renovation scheduled to begin next summer. Consultants who worked on the plan said breaking down the structure was necessary because renovations based on the school's current design would require too much work to meet safety codes.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | November 26, 1997
Suspensions of Howard County students grew by more than 50 percent from 1995 to 1997, according to school data released yesterday.The largest increase was among elementary school students. In 1994-1995, officials issued 72 suspensions among the more than 16,500 elementary students; some students were suspended more than once. Two years later, that number grew about 110 percent, to 151 suspensions.Middle school suspensions grew by 16 percent, from 983 to 1,138. The number of middle school girls suspended rose 65 percent, according to the information presented at a school board meeting yesterday.
NEWS
May 18, 2008
More suspensions the wrong answer The adage that experience is the best teacher is an appropriate response to those who believe school suspensions are the way to push children who misbehave out of our school systems ("Discipline's Cost," May 11). History demonstrates that the zero-tolerance policy has failed to act as a deterrent to students. Nine percent of the students in Maryland's public schools were suspended in the 2006-2007 school year, and that figure was up from just 6 percent 15 years earlier.
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