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By Susan Reimer | August 31, 1999
THE FIRST day of school rather than the first day of the new year has always meant a fresh start to me.Nothing seems as "new" on Jan. 1 as it does on Sept. 1: new shoes; stiff, new jeans; a clean backpack; a fresh haircut; unsharpened pencils, fresh paper. What does New Year's Day have to compare with these things?My back-to-school days are far behind me, but my children approach the first day of school with a kind of anticipation matched only by Christmas Day, and their excitement vibrates in some long forgotten place inside of me.Like them, I begin each new school year with fresh resolutions.
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NEWS
September 3, 2014
For decades, schools, teachers and families were very happy with schools starting after Labor Day ( "Late start a non-starter," Sept. 2). It meant that families did not have to end a vacation early to come home for three days of school and then have three days more vacation! There is plenty of time in the school calendar to put those three days back in where they used to be - or another place if preferred. As for "forcing a longer summer break," I doubt that most families would regret the change back.
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NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,Sun Staff Writer | April 7, 1994
Touching, name-calling and unwanted attention are increasingly prevalent in schools, students say, and one Harford County teen has decided it's time to fight back.Nicole Bonis is setting up her own feminist group to address a variety of topics from sexual harassment to women's health."I've wanted to do this since starting high school," says Nicole, an 11th-grader at Bel Air High School who says she has experienced sexual harassment at school."It's so rampant," the 17-year-old says. "I try not to let it get to me."
NEWS
August 25, 2014
The majority of Maryland public schools are slated to start the week of Aug. 25 after this year's summer break. While I was on the Baltimore City school board, whenever I spoke with families regarding the opening day of school the question invariably arose: "Why does school start a week before Labor Day?" A changed start date for school shouldn't be mandated by the state. But local jurisdictions should certainly seek input from students, parents, teachers and stakeholders for feedback on district school calendars.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,arin.gencer@baltsun.com | August 29, 2009
Sitting at the desk that would be hers for the school year, Casey Burton peered inside the new, black backpack she found hanging on the back of her chair and smiled. "Look, you got a notebook this year," said her mother, Rebecca West. The 7-year-old's smile grew wider as West pointed out other materials: a new pencil box, fresh pencils, crayons and scissors. "And," the second-grader said, holding them up with a grin, "I got glue sticks." She and hundreds of others had poured into Dundalk's Sandy Plains Elementary on Friday afternoon for "Sneak a Peek at Your Seat," during which they met their teachers, explored their classrooms and glimpsed some of the classmates they would be rubbing elbows with Monday, when school starts in Baltimore County.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Sun Staff Writer | August 26, 1994
The spell of summer began to break yesterday, as Jessica Rennenkampf admired Sleeping Beauty's castle at the Enchanted Forest theme park in Ellicott City.And these were the magic words: "School starts Monday.""I'm sort of excited, and sort of not," said Jessica, 7, who will be a second-grader at Jeffers Hill Elementary School in Columbia. "I'm not going to have as much time to read, and I won't be able to horseback-ride much, and we won't be able to take four-day weekends."You could almost hear the collective sigh this week, as thousands of students in Howard, Carroll and Anne Arundel counties thought briefly about going back to school on Monday -- and savored their last few days of summer vacation.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | July 13, 2000
Less than eight weeks before school starts, the city needs six principals and more than 400 teachers, despite an effort launched two years ago to do more hiring earlier. As of last week, 505 teachers had been hired to fill 934 vacancies, Theodore E. Thornton, human resources director, told the school board Tuesday night. The number of remaining vacancies, now 429, could grow by Saturday, the deadline for teachers to tell the school system whether they are leaving. "We've got a daunting task," J. Tyson Tildon, school board president, said yesterday.
SPORTS
By HEATHER A. DINICH | August 16, 2007
I can't wait until school starts at Maryland. Why? Because the only thing open in the student union - where I spend a majority of my time these days - is McDonald's. So I was cranky and hungry when we walked into Ralph Friedgen's office Tuesday afternoon, and he was a little feisty himself. This is probably why: "The defense played very well. They kicked the offense's [butt]," he said. "Outhustled them, out-toughed them. Just kicked them all over the field." I asked him if he has added a second player to his 105-man practice roster.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Sun Staff Writer | August 6, 1994
The Baltimore County school system is reclaiming another school, the former Inverness Elementary at 8301 Lynch Road in Inverness on the county's east side.Beginning this fall, the school will become Inverness Center, an alternative middle school for students considered too disruptive for their home schools.It will house the alternative program started last year at Eastwood Center, a former special education school on Westham Way in the Dundalk area.In June, the school system took back the old Campfield Elementary School building from the county, also for use as an alternative school.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | August 16, 1998
County school officials have barred any use of the auditorium at North County High School because several 15-pound ceiling tiles fell to the floor recently, and other tiles are starting to come loose. No one was in the auditorium when the first tiles fell during the last week in July, said Principal Patricia Gronkiewicz.Officials are reviewing contractors who could remove all the tiles so the auditorium can be reopened as soon as possible, said Ed Almes, school system maintenance supervisor.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2014
Last year, the Common Core was debated by everyone from conservative talk show hosts to parents flooding state capitals, and teachers rebelled against a new evaluation system they believe is unfair. Now it's year two for the phase-in of controversial education reforms. And while students returning to Maryland classrooms this week may be blissfully unaware of the debate, they will see more changes. First, they can forget about the MSA (Maryland School Assessment) and learn the name for new state tests: PARCC, or Partnership for Assessment for Readiness for College and Careers.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2014
As Baltimore County prepared for a major shift in education to take effect this school year, Superintendent Dallas Dance promised that the system's 53,000 elementary students would be taught with a "world-class" curriculum. But the initial multimillion-dollar effort to develop course plans for language arts collapsed as complaints flew in both directions between school officials and a Washington-based company hired for the project, according to email and other documents obtained by The Baltimore Sun in a public records request.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2013
Annapolis High School student Dajuan Gay left an after-school job early Wednesday so he could petition the Anne Arundel County Board of Education for later school start time. The junior than left the board meeting to resume his regimented daily schedule - which he said usually ends with bedtime at 1 a.m. "I'm getting around four hours of sleep every night … and that's with work, homework, school track and other extracurricular activities," said Gay, whose comments to the school board culminated two hours of public testimony from students, administrators, parents and advocates, all pressing for later high school start times in Anne Arundel County.
NEWS
October 3, 2013
Any parent of a teenager in high school probably already knows how hard it is to get their child out of bed in the morning for that 7:35 a.m. Algebra II class. Their teachers know it too: At that hour kids are slumped over their desks, sleepy, grumpy and apparently incapable of paying attention to much of anything, let alone to the mysteries of logarithmic functions. Kids who are asleep in class obviously won't learn much, but the truth is that it's not necessarily their fault that they can't stay awake.
NEWS
rusvw13@gmail.com | September 12, 2013
Immaculate Conception School in Towson kicked off the new year with a visit from the Most Rev. William E. Lori, archbishop of Baltimore, who celebrated the school's expanding population and programs
 by welcoming its 560 students to the first day of classes. "It was an honor for him to choose our school," said sixth-grader Danielle Escobal. Joined by Dr. Barbara McGraw-Edmondson, superintendent of Catholic schools for the Archdiocese of Baltimore, the archbishop toured the newly renovated campus and visited with teachers and students.
NEWS
August 22, 2013
The report by Maryland Comptroller Peter Franchot on the economic benefits to Maryland from a post-Labor Day school start deserves far more respect, attention and consideration than given to it in a recent editorial in The Sun ("One week and counting," Aug. 19). The comptroller's report follows approval of legislation in the last General Assembly session to establish a task force to study a post-Labor Day start date for Maryland public schools. It is worth noting that following public hearings in both the House and the Senate, the legislation calling for this study passed the Senate 46 to 1, passed the House of Delegates 124 to 6 and was signed into law by Gov. Martin O'Malley.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,SUN STAFF | October 20, 1995
Teachers, administrators, parents and students touted last night what they described as recent improvements in safety in Baltimore City public schools.Their remarks came at a community forum at Harford Heights Elementary School in East Baltimore called by the school board and Superintendent Walter G. Amprey.The forum, attended by about 125 people, was held two weeks after a grand jury faulted the school system's "piecemeal" approach to curbing crime. The panel said the system has failed to reduce the growing problem of student violence.
NEWS
August 20, 2000
Advice and strategies to help your children read Easing back in to school days The build-up to the first day of school is filled with excitement, anticipation and, sometimes, apprehension. As a parent, you are your child's first teacher. Positive attitudes toward school can help the transition from summer back to school go more smoothly. Before school starts Ease the change from vacation to school time by setting an earlier bedtime each night. Set a goal to be on a regular bedtime schedule by the time school starts.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2013
Comptroller Peter Franchot's campaign to push back the start of the public school year until after Labor Day picked up the cautious support of Gov. Martin O'Malley Wednesday. After Franchot opened a meeting of the Board of Public Works by laying out the case for an extended summer vacation, O'Malley said he hopes a task force studying the proposal support the idea. "I'm for that. Hopefully the task force will come out our way," said O'Malley, who generally doesn't show much enthusiasm for the comptroller's ideas.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2013
Eastern Shore and Western Maryland lawmakers joined Comptroller Peter Franchot on Thursday in calling for school to start after Labor Day. The proposed change, hailed as a way to promote family time and extend the tourist season, would have a $74.3 million economic impact, the Bureau of Revenue Estimates said in a new report. School starts this year in most school systems around the state Aug. 26, a week before Labor Day. "It's one of the traditions we should bring back," Franchot said on the Ocean City boardwalk.
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