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NEWS
May 28, 2013
I am grateful that we have people who care enough about our vulnerable children, youth and their families to try a variety of ways to reach them and encourage them. I am also grateful that there are people checking to ensure that tax dollars are used correctly ("Harris calls for expanded audit of school funds," May 24). May we all come together and work together to be sure that we are taking care of every child and young person, and her or his family. Muriel Berkeley
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Letter to The Aegis | August 6, 2013
Editor: As you probably have noticed, the subject of education funding in Harford County has been a hot topic of late. And with good reason, since the education of our children and grandchildren is one of the most consequential responsibilities we have as a society. Sadly, there has been a great deal of confusion regarding how education is funded and administered in the state of Maryland, which itself is a situation that needs drastic change. In Maryland, local Boards of Education are independent bodies created by the state to administer local public education.
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NEWS
May 29, 2013
It's easy to bash Baltimore schools for wasting federal money on extravagant chicken dinners when that money was supposed to serve some of the neediest children in the state, but this type of behavior, in a slightly more tame fashion, is routine ("Audit faults schools over federal funds," May 23). Public schools routinely spend money on activities that do not increase what students learn - that was the conclusion of a 2012 Harvard University study considering whether increasing school spending also increases student achievement.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | August 2, 2013
Kohl's Department Stores is giving away prizes in a promotion to spur back-to-school spending. The "Win Great Things Back-to-School Sweepstakes" promotion will run through Sept. 2. Starting Sunday, shoppers will get one scratch-off game piece for every $30 spent for a chance to win items such as Keurigmini-coffee brewers, JanSport backpacks,  iTunes gift cards, movie tickets, Shutterfly prints and other merchandise. The discount department store, which operates 1,155 stores in 49 states,  also will be giving away 50 gift cards totaling $1,000.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2011
Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold's proposals to step up oversight of school board spending are being denounced as "unnecessary" by the county schools chief. At a county House delegation meeting Friday morning, Superintendent Kevin M. Maxwell, who has long butted heads with Leopold, spoke out against the legislation and hinted that the proposals are personally motivated. School officials said the legislation would impose rules on Anne Arundel that no other school system is required to adhere to. The proposed legislation, in the form of two separate bills, is being discussed by the county's delegation, though no lawmakers have agreed to sponsor the bills.
NEWS
March 1, 2005
AFTER SCRAMBLING to deal with a $58 million shortfall last year, Baltimore city's school system is now underspending - by $30 million so far this year in its operating budget. It's not that the system is suddenly flush with cash, as school officials point out that they are still wading in red ink. But those officials also admitted recently that $97 million in approved construction money had not been spent over the past five years. School officials need to figure out exactly what is happening and why. The discovery of last year's shortfall led to a partial bailout by the city and a promise by the school system to erase the deficit in two years.
NEWS
By Michael J. Clark and Michael J. Clark,Howard County Bureau of The Sun | March 7, 1991
Howard County Executive Charles I. Ecker received a legal opinion from the state attorney general's office yesterday that will allow him to trim about $2.9 million from the education budget.The superintendent of schools has said such a cutback could affect class sizes or the previously negotiated 6 percent pay raise for teachers, which Mr. Ecker has criticized as unnecessary in a time of "financial crisis."At issue was a state regulation that requires local jurisdictions to maintain at least the same level of spending per pupil as the previous year.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | May 14, 1997
Nearly 600 people turned out for last night's County Council hearing on next year's school spending, applauding opposition to a plan to trim the budget by moving school health workers into the county health department and requests to spend more money on textbooks.Two groups of parents made references to the prospect of lawsuits against the county, one over providing for children with special health and education needs, the other over whether North County sixth-graders still in elementary schools are being shortchanged by missing out on middle school courses.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | August 12, 1997
The county's budget director wants to hire an analyst to review spending by Carroll County schools, but the analyst would report to him rather than the school board.The move could heal or worsen relations between the County Commissioners and Board of Education, which have debated spending and construction needs for years.The commissioners contend the school could find ways to trim expenses. School officials counter that Carroll spends less than the state average per student. They say that even though Carroll's population is rising, the state has consistently rated the county's as one of Maryland's top three performing public school systems.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | May 25, 2001
Despite one member's concerns about Carroll's property tax rate, the Board of County Commissioners unanimously approved yesterday a spending plan for fiscal year 2002. "We're in a much better financial position than we were a couple years ago," said Commissioner Robin Bartlett Frazier, who voted against the Carroll property tax rate but in favor of the spending plan. "I think we can afford to give the citizens back a portion of their tax dollars." Frazier suggested last week that the board decrease the county property tax rate by 1 cent, but Commissioners Julia Walsh Gouge and Donald I. Dell balked at the idea.
NEWS
May 29, 2013
It's easy to bash Baltimore schools for wasting federal money on extravagant chicken dinners when that money was supposed to serve some of the neediest children in the state, but this type of behavior, in a slightly more tame fashion, is routine ("Audit faults schools over federal funds," May 23). Public schools routinely spend money on activities that do not increase what students learn - that was the conclusion of a 2012 Harvard University study considering whether increasing school spending also increases student achievement.
NEWS
May 28, 2013
I am grateful that we have people who care enough about our vulnerable children, youth and their families to try a variety of ways to reach them and encourage them. I am also grateful that there are people checking to ensure that tax dollars are used correctly ("Harris calls for expanded audit of school funds," May 24). May we all come together and work together to be sure that we are taking care of every child and young person, and her or his family. Muriel Berkeley
NEWS
May 23, 2013
Among the expenditures by the city school system that U.S. Department of Education auditors found inappropriate: $4,352 spent by two elementary schools for dinner cruises at Baltimore's Inner Harbor $2,413 spent on fried chicken, potato salad, coleslaw, biscuits, cookies and soda for 28 attendees at a PTA meeting to discuss a school's budget $1,336 spent to take 30 people to a theater performance downtown that included dinner, dancing and...
NEWS
By Erica L. Green and Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2013
The Maryland State Department of Education may have to pay back up to $540,000 in federal money intended to help the state's poorest schools after a scathing audit found that Baltimore City was one of two school districts that misspent the funds, using the money for dinner cruises, makeovers and meals. The report, reviewing grant expenses from 2009 and 2010, was conducted by the Office of the Inspector General for the U.S. Department of Education. It found similar misspending in Prince George's County schools.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2012
State and city lawmakers sharply criticized the Baltimore school system Monday after a searing audit called attention to a lack of oversight on school spending. Elected officials said they were deeply concerned by the preliminary audit report, which showed that the system failed to collect millions of dollars of debts, could not substantiate the bulk of overtime payments, and paid contracts and bills without verifying them. "There needs to be accountability in the school system," said Del. Keiffer Mitchell, a Baltimore Democrat whose two children attend city schools.
NEWS
August 28, 2012
I was very troubled as I read the article by Erica L. Green ("City schools officials play lose with credit," Aug. 26), not for the issue of expenses but for the pattern of negativity I see routinely by The Sun toward the school district and the people who work so hard to move our children forward. I work for a charter operator, Baltimore Curriculum Project, so I see daily the efforts our school leaders, efforts led by Andrés Alonso and his staff. Ms. Green's article, following on the heels of an earlier piece on replacing principals, is without deep analysis, offers innuendo without facts and provides a platform to chastise our leaders with no real substance or foundations.
NEWS
November 8, 1996
MARYLAND'S GENERAL ASSEMBLY passed a school spending law a decade ago called "maintenance of effort." It has a simple premise: To ensure that localities spend as much on each student's education as they did the previous year. It did not seem such an onerous request of local government.Today, the assembly's Joint Committee on Administrative, Executive and Legislative Review will hear arguments in favor of riddling that declaration with various loopholes. The result could be a setback for Maryland public school students.
NEWS
February 4, 1996
LAST FALL, county leaders in Maryland complained that Gov. Parris N. Glendening was poised to cut the income tax rate to make himself look good to voters at their expense. They worried this would mean less state aid and higher local taxes. But the governor listened to them and in his budget increased both local aid and education aid, even as he was laying off hundreds of state employees and cutting other programs.But that's not enough for the counties, which are trying to reduce projected future spending on schools by rolling back the state's 10-year-old "maintenance of effort" law. This statute now requires jurisdictions to spend at least as much per pupil as they spent the year before.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and Glenn Graham, The Baltimore Sun | July 6, 2012
With high temperatures soaring above 90 degrees across the Baltimore region in recent weeks, it wouldn't be surprising to see high school students relaxing in their air-conditioned homes for the entire summer, playing video games and other indoor activities as they await the start of a new school year. But these local athletes are finding different ways to beat the heat - from spending time on the water to traveling out of the country to caring for animals and more. Tasmine Prater, Parkville Track, cross country Nia Williams, Patapsco Track, basketball, cheerleading With their summer jobs, Tasmine Prater and Nia Williams can't stay inside as the temperature climbs, but they're in the next best place - on the water, sailing near the Inner Harbor.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2012
Baltimore school employees would be forced to take furlough days if the district has to absorb millions of dollars in education cuts outlined in the state's "doomsday" budget, city schools CEO Andrés Alonso said Tuesday as he prepared to present the fiscal year 2013 budget. In preparation for a massive cut to public education should lawmakers fail to approve higher taxes in a special session starting Monday, the school system has developed a plan to negotiate with labor unions to have employees take four unpaid days off. Alonso said the system found that the four furlough days, which would not include instructional days, would yield enough savings to hold school budgets untouched, a guiding principle of the system's budget.
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