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By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | October 31, 1999
Delma Gordon, a retired social worker who wrote the words to the Paul Lawrence Dunbar High School song, died Tuesday of a pulmonary ailment at Northwest Hospital Center. She was 76 and lived on Ellamont Street.As a member of Dunbar's first graduating class in 1940, she wrote words to the song that was sung by the students who received their diplomas at the school's original location in East Baltimore. The song is still sung at school functions.In the days of racial segregation, Dunbar was the city's second all-black high school, attended by students who lived in East Baltimore.
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NEWS
August 19, 2014
If Baltimore County residents had any doubts about the wisdom of moving toward a hybrid appointed/elected school board rather than the all-appointed version we have now, they were likely erased last week when the board voted to hand Superintendent Dallas Dance what amounts to a $27,000 raise. Not only did the board employ what is at best linguistic sleight of hand to provide Mr. Dance a bigger raise than his contract would allow, but it also shut down any public discussion of whether the raise was warranted.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2012
If Notre Dame or Michigan decided to change their school fight songs, the moves would likely spark objections from students, alumni and faculty. At St. John's College, however, it's a bit different. On April 28, at its 30th annual croquet match against the U.S. Naval Academy, the school planned to introduce a new fight song. And it appears people on the college's Annapolis campus don't seem to mind. That's partly because few can recall the current fight song. "I don't know if any students at the school know what our current official song is," said student John Fleming of Gaithersburg, an imperial wicket (or a captain)
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2012
If Notre Dame or Michigan decided to change their school fight songs, the moves would likely spark objections from students, alumni and faculty. At St. John's College, however, it's a bit different. On April 28, at its 30th annual croquet match against the U.S. Naval Academy, the school planned to introduce a new fight song. And it appears people on the college's Annapolis campus don't seem to mind. That's partly because few can recall the current fight song. "I don't know if any students at the school know what our current official song is," said student John Fleming of Gaithersburg, an imperial wicket (or a captain)
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | February 3, 1999
One second-grader wanted to write a song about John Travolta, another about "my stinky little brother." Other suggestions included "rotten little sisters," Russia, outer space and, well, "everything."The writing of the national anthem, it wasn't. But, for dozens of pupils at North Laurel's Gorman Crossing Elementary School, the music they composed yesterday was equally important.Under the auspices of local singer and songwriter Sue Trainor, who has been serving as Gorman's artist-in-residence this week, pupils in five classrooms began writing verses for class songs -- and a school song -- that they will perform at an assembly this month.
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | December 14, 1990
FROM SONGS can come love, strength, friendship and hope. From certain songs, like "One Little Candle," comes hope. There was a lot of hope the other day at Chizuk Amuno Congregation.Two choruses of 32 children, seven of them from the Chimes School for retarded children in Mount Washington, sang the song of hope to more than 100 students and teachers at the Solomon Schechter Day School at the congregation. And they sang it beautifully.Eight were soloists out front. Miriam Stewart from Schechter's fifth-grade chorus started with "One little candle burning bright."
NEWS
By ESTHER R. COOPER | May 20, 1993
''We will always do our best for dear old 59,Dear old 59, dear old 59,We will try to measure up to every kind of testAll for 59.We will push, push, push all the clouds away,And watch them all roll by.With a cheerful heart,We will do our part,While we smile, gaily smiling all the while.''start CMjust found textjust loaded one line As innocent elementary-school students, we did not see the deeper meaning of those words in our school song. How could we possibly realize how many of those clouds we really would have to push away and the need to face life's trials and tribulations with a positive attitude?
NEWS
August 19, 2014
If Baltimore County residents had any doubts about the wisdom of moving toward a hybrid appointed/elected school board rather than the all-appointed version we have now, they were likely erased last week when the board voted to hand Superintendent Dallas Dance what amounts to a $27,000 raise. Not only did the board employ what is at best linguistic sleight of hand to provide Mr. Dance a bigger raise than his contract would allow, but it also shut down any public discussion of whether the raise was warranted.
NEWS
By Natalie Harvey and Natalie Harvey,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 13, 1997
MUSIC IS in the air from Thunder Hill Elementary School, beginning at 2 p.m. Sunday, when the fourth-grade chorus will present "Music Around the World" in the courtyard of the Oakland Mills Village Center.Herbrette Richardson will direct the chorus.The next day, students at Thunder Hill will attend performances by soprano Mary Ann Evangelista at the school.Sponsored by Thunder Hill's Parents Teachers Association, the East Columbian will perform skits -- " 'Liza Doolittle" and "Star & the Birdcatcher."
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,Staff writer | February 7, 1992
The kindergartners sang, "Grandparents . . . are great" to the chorus of "Sunrise, Sunset." The third-graders led cheers for grandpa and grandma, and the fifth-graders read poems yesterday to honor the 70-some grandparents who came to visit at Solley Elementary School.Grandparents Day is "a tradition in the schools in the county that started years ago," explained Deborah Huey, principal at Solley. "It's one of the most successful activities we have in the school."Yesterday, balding, gray-haired grandfathers and henna-rinsed grandmothers -- some of whom attended Solley Elementary when they were children -- munched cookies and sipped punch before they joined the offspring of their offspring in classrooms.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | October 5, 2000
Cindy Bauchspies always likes to tell her choral students a little something about the people who write the music they sing. For the Christmas concert at Annapolis Area Christian School, where she teaches, Bauchspies chose several pieces by contemporary composer Stephen Paulus. So she scanned the Internet and found www.stephenpaulus.com. What she learned was that the man whose music graces her favorite holiday compact disc would be visiting Annapolis in two weeks. A few emails and phone calls later, the composer agreed to add Bauchspies' class to his itinerary.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | October 31, 1999
Delma Gordon, a retired social worker who wrote the words to the Paul Lawrence Dunbar High School song, died Tuesday of a pulmonary ailment at Northwest Hospital Center. She was 76 and lived on Ellamont Street.As a member of Dunbar's first graduating class in 1940, she wrote words to the song that was sung by the students who received their diplomas at the school's original location in East Baltimore. The song is still sung at school functions.In the days of racial segregation, Dunbar was the city's second all-black high school, attended by students who lived in East Baltimore.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | February 3, 1999
One second-grader wanted to write a song about John Travolta, another about "my stinky little brother." Other suggestions included "rotten little sisters," Russia, outer space and, well, "everything."The writing of the national anthem, it wasn't. But, for dozens of pupils at North Laurel's Gorman Crossing Elementary School, the music they composed yesterday was equally important.Under the auspices of local singer and songwriter Sue Trainor, who has been serving as Gorman's artist-in-residence this week, pupils in five classrooms began writing verses for class songs -- and a school song -- that they will perform at an assembly this month.
NEWS
By Natalie Harvey and Natalie Harvey,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 13, 1997
MUSIC IS in the air from Thunder Hill Elementary School, beginning at 2 p.m. Sunday, when the fourth-grade chorus will present "Music Around the World" in the courtyard of the Oakland Mills Village Center.Herbrette Richardson will direct the chorus.The next day, students at Thunder Hill will attend performances by soprano Mary Ann Evangelista at the school.Sponsored by Thunder Hill's Parents Teachers Association, the East Columbian will perform skits -- " 'Liza Doolittle" and "Star & the Birdcatcher."
NEWS
By ESTHER R. COOPER | May 20, 1993
''We will always do our best for dear old 59,Dear old 59, dear old 59,We will try to measure up to every kind of testAll for 59.We will push, push, push all the clouds away,And watch them all roll by.With a cheerful heart,We will do our part,While we smile, gaily smiling all the while.''start CMjust found textjust loaded one line As innocent elementary-school students, we did not see the deeper meaning of those words in our school song. How could we possibly realize how many of those clouds we really would have to push away and the need to face life's trials and tribulations with a positive attitude?
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,Staff writer | February 7, 1992
The kindergartners sang, "Grandparents . . . are great" to the chorus of "Sunrise, Sunset." The third-graders led cheers for grandpa and grandma, and the fifth-graders read poems yesterday to honor the 70-some grandparents who came to visit at Solley Elementary School.Grandparents Day is "a tradition in the schools in the county that started years ago," explained Deborah Huey, principal at Solley. "It's one of the most successful activities we have in the school."Yesterday, balding, gray-haired grandfathers and henna-rinsed grandmothers -- some of whom attended Solley Elementary when they were children -- munched cookies and sipped punch before they joined the offspring of their offspring in classrooms.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | October 5, 2000
Cindy Bauchspies always likes to tell her choral students a little something about the people who write the music they sing. For the Christmas concert at Annapolis Area Christian School, where she teaches, Bauchspies chose several pieces by contemporary composer Stephen Paulus. So she scanned the Internet and found www.stephenpaulus.com. What she learned was that the man whose music graces her favorite holiday compact disc would be visiting Annapolis in two weeks. A few emails and phone calls later, the composer agreed to add Bauchspies' class to his itinerary.
NEWS
February 7, 1996
C.A. 'Buck' Long, 90, C&P Telephone employeeCharles Arthur "Buck" Long, a retired telephone company employee, died Saturday in his sleep at his home in Towson. He was 90.He joined the Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. of Maryland as a lineman in 1923 after graduating from Polytechnic Institute and retired as an installation instructor in 1970.The Philadelphia native, who moved to Baltimore as a child, told friends that he had climbed every telephone pole on the Eastern Shore, said a daughter, Judith Moss of Virginia Beach, Va.He was a member of the Mount Nebo Masons in Perry Hall, the Scottish Rite of the Masons in Baltimore, the Shriners Club in Ocean City, where he had a summer home, and the C&P Pioneers.
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | December 14, 1990
FROM SONGS can come love, strength, friendship and hope. From certain songs, like "One Little Candle," comes hope. There was a lot of hope the other day at Chizuk Amuno Congregation.Two choruses of 32 children, seven of them from the Chimes School for retarded children in Mount Washington, sang the song of hope to more than 100 students and teachers at the Solomon Schechter Day School at the congregation. And they sang it beautifully.Eight were soloists out front. Miriam Stewart from Schechter's fifth-grade chorus started with "One little candle burning bright."
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