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NEWS
By Katherine S. Newman | August 28, 2012
"It can't happen here. " From the safety of suburban Maryland, it is only natural to think that random shootings erupting in movie theaters in Colorado will not visit our neighborhoods. Safe, quiet, stable communities are not the places we imagine when we think of kids and guns, the excitement of the first day at school and the terror of "code red," the evacuation of our children and debates over whether to charge a 15-year-old shooter as a kid or an adult. But it did happen at Perry Hall High School on Monday, and so we must follow the self-examination that other communities, from Littleton, Colo.
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FEATURES
By Kristine Henry,
The Baltimore Sun
| January 25, 2014
When a tragedy strikes -- whether it's a shooting like the one at The Mall in Columbia, or one of the seemingly endless string of school shootings across the country -- it's often difficult to know how to discuss these incidents with your children. Tell them too much and you could add to their anxiety. Tell them too little and they may be confused and scared without the reassurance they need. The Johns Hopkins Children's Center's website offers these tips from child psychiatrist Patrick Kelly, M.D. and child  psychologist Renee DeBoard-Lucas, Ph.D.: "Deal with your own anxiety first: Do not start a conversation with your child until you have calmed down and the initial shock has worn off. Children have perfect radars for parental moods and can easily sense when something is off. Anxious parents can transmit their own anxiety to children, a phenomenon known as “ trickle-down anxiety .” Timing is everything: Start out by finding out how much the child knows already.
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NEWS
September 14, 2012
There is a connection between the disheartening events of Baltimore County students bringing weapons to school and the violence we see overseas ("School safety promised," Sept. 12). We are the richest, most powerful nation in the world. We are also the most violent nation. The nightly television news is filled with violence from across the country. Wonder why? Look at how the U.S. resolves its racial problems at home: More arrests, incarceration and capital punishment. Abroad, the county solves its issues with foreign governments with attacks that kill civilians.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2013
In the wake of the deadly bombings in Boston and the fertilizer plant explosion in West, Texas, the Maryland State Board of Education on Tuesday approved new emergency planning guidelines meant to help local school systems better prepare for disaster. "It's very timely that we're here today, given the events that occurred last week," said Chuck Buckler, executive director of the student services and strategic planning branch of the Maryland State Department of Education. The 218-page document updates safety guidelines developed a decade ago and emphasizes the creation of individualized plans that address multiple hazards, from school shootings to tornadoes.
EXPLORE
February 11, 2013
The biggest flaw of democracy is that politicians would say anything and do anything to fool the "majority. " If you subscribe to the concept that smartest constituents constitute top 10 percent or so, democratically elected politicians represent the wishes of the "majority" not the wishes of their "smartest" constituents. Take the opportunistic response of Gov. Martin O'Malley to the Connecticut school shooting. Nothing in his proposal would have prevented the Sandy Hook shooting, including limits in size of the magazines.
NEWS
By Joseph Gasper | April 19, 2007
This week's shooting incident at Virginia Tech has spawned intense media coverage, much of which has served to perpetuate myths about school shootings. The first myth is that this latest shooting is a point in an escalation of such incidents. Although rampage school shootings increased during the 1990s, after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, school shootings virtually came to a halt. One explanation is that school officials have gotten better at foiling shooting plots before they materialize.
NEWS
April 22, 1999
Here are excerpts of reactions to the Littleton, Colo., school shootings from some of the nation's newspaper editorial pages:Los Angeles Times -- Why is it that other kids seem to recognize a volatility in troubled youths that adults seem to miss? There are no answers yet. There's only the continuing fatal mix of hormones, hurt feelings and high-powered firearms.Seattle Times -- The first rash of shootings prompted disbelief that such a thing could happen at a school. By Springfield, Ore., last May, the disbelief had narrowed.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2001
Faced with increasing threats of violence in school, Carroll County education officials are teaming up with the state's attorney's office to increase awareness of a 2-year-old anonymous tip line aimed at preventing school shootings that have struck other parts of the country. School administrators plan to distribute hundreds of posters and thousands of business cards this month with the phone number - 410-386-2045. Carroll State's Attorney Jerry F. Barnes also has added a toll-free number - 866-332-7363, which spells out "fear end" on the telephone - to accommodate South Carroll residents for whom the tip line has been a long-distance call.
TOPIC
By Ishmael Reed | May 30, 1999
THE LATEST SPATE of school shootings has been followed by the same vacuous media commentaries that accompanied earlier trag-edies. Generally, television and movies have gotten the blame for inspiring the young shooters.The commentators ignore the fact that during the nation's bloodiest century, the 19th, neither television nor radio was around when rival white ethnic gangsters in Northeastern cities littered the streets with corpses.On April 20 at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colo.
NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN | May 8, 1998
GREENWOOD, S.C. - It has been 10 years since a deranged gunman killed two of her third-grade classmates at Oakland Elementary School, time enough for Kalynn Ruth to grow from the frightened child who ran from her reading table into an articulate young woman.Ruth, now 17, is president of the Greenwood High School senior class, works on the school literary magazine and is bound for college. When people ask her if she is OK after the shooting witnessed more than half her life ago, she assures them that she is.Perhaps the communities of Jonesboro, Ark.; West Paducah, Ky.; and Edinboro, Pa. - all towns where school shootings in the past few months have done violence to a community's sense of peace - can take comfort in Ruth's quick smile and active life.
NEWS
April 16, 2013
I noticed with all the gun control talk and various politicians knocking each other over for the microphone to create a new law to save lives, those same politicians failed to do the same for the seven inmate deaths in the last seven months ("Senate gives final approval to gun control bill" April 4). How could this be? A controlled environment (government run) where no weapons are allowed, let alone guns, has seven homicides in seven months! Surely, a politician during this most recent session in Annapolis would have sponsored some bill, right?
NEWS
March 11, 2013
It should be obvious to all that the sentence imposed upon Robert Gladden is not due to his actual crimes, heinous as they were, but as a statement in response to the tragedy of Newtown ("High school shooter gets 35 years," Feb. 26). No doubt an extra 20 years was "tacked on" to show the country that Maryland is "tough on crime" and to use the Perry Hall teen-ager as a scapegoat and example for all school shootings. Jim Jagielski, Forest Hill
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun and By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2013
A crush of applications to buy firearms in Maryland has overwhelmed the Maryland State Police, which said Tuesday it has tripled manpower to process more than 26,000 applications made in December and January. Last month alone, 14,000 Marylanders applied to purchase a gun, up from 4,609 in January 2012. The increase is attributed to state and national proposals for tougher gun control laws in the wake of the Newtown, Conn., school shootings in December. The backlog has created a four-week delay in processing the applications.
EXPLORE
February 11, 2013
The biggest flaw of democracy is that politicians would say anything and do anything to fool the "majority. " If you subscribe to the concept that smartest constituents constitute top 10 percent or so, democratically elected politicians represent the wishes of the "majority" not the wishes of their "smartest" constituents. Take the opportunistic response of Gov. Martin O'Malley to the Connecticut school shooting. Nothing in his proposal would have prevented the Sandy Hook shooting, including limits in size of the magazines.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2013
Cameras that stream live to police stations and patrol cars, new entry systems in all schools and a state-of-the-art visitor identification system are part of a $3.7 million plan unveiled Tuesday to improve security in Baltimore County public schools. "We have no greater responsibility as leaders than to protect our children when they go to school each and every day," said County Executive Kevin Kamenetz in announcing the proposal at a news conference in Towson, where he was joined by Superintendent Dallas Dance, Police Chief Jim Johnson and County Council members.
EXPLORE
Letter to The Aegis | December 20, 2012
Editor: Returning to another Monday morning at work after a horrifically violent attack. I will pray for my students and for my own strength as we try to learn in the midst of grieving for the loss of so many. Maybe diagraming sentences will occupy their minds or maybe we can get lost in a story. Teachers like me all across the country will pretend to our students that it isn't on our minds. We will close our classroom doors and think we will be safe; we want to believe we will be safe but we can't really think it. Not after Columbine.
NEWS
July 9, 1998
THE LESSON we should have learned from recent school shootings across the country is that though these tragedies are anomalies, we cannot take our own schools' safety for granted.Today, for reasons no one fully understands but which probably are rooted in our culture's glorification of violence, access to firearms and the complexities of family life, some young people are moved to hurt and even kill others.Schools need to be alert to signs of trouble and prepared to deal with violence.It's good to see Baltimore County Superintendent Anthony G. Marchione taking an active role.
NEWS
March 11, 2013
It should be obvious to all that the sentence imposed upon Robert Gladden is not due to his actual crimes, heinous as they were, but as a statement in response to the tragedy of Newtown ("High school shooter gets 35 years," Feb. 26). No doubt an extra 20 years was "tacked on" to show the country that Maryland is "tough on crime" and to use the Perry Hall teen-ager as a scapegoat and example for all school shootings. Jim Jagielski, Forest Hill
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2012
As the Newtown, Conn., community looks for comfort in the wake of one of the most deadly school shootings in history, it will be able to tap into the hearts of students in Baltimore City. Students at Dallas F. Nicholas Sr. Elementary School have joined a national movement called "Paper Hearts Across America," an initiative that started over construction paper and scissors in the home of a Billings, Mont., family and has sparked a nationwide effort to send millions of hearts to Connecticut.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2012
Anne Arundel County government officials on Wednesday vowed an increased police presence at public schools on Friday amid rumors about a possible school attack that officials say has been determined to be unfounded. At a news conference, Anne Arundel County Executive John Leopold, school Superintendent Kevin Maxwell and Lt. J.D. Batten, commander of the Anne Arundel County Police School Safety Section, sought to quell concerns about rumors of school shootings planned Friday. They declined to say which schools would have an increased police presence.
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