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NEWS
October 18, 2012
This week, Baltimore County school officials started distributing hand-held metal detectors to school resource officers to help in the effort to keep weapons off campus. At the same time, Anne Arundel County made an app for students to submit tips about possible threats available on iTunes and Google Play. Parents who are worried about the rash of weapons incidents in area schools this year may be inclined to think Baltimore County is taking the more significant step, but research and recent experience suggest otherwise.
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NEWS
By Colin Campbell and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder will visit Baltimore Wednesday night to announce $63 million in federal grants awarded to study school safety to reduce gun violence across the nation. Baltimore County Public Schools and the University of Maryland, Baltimore will receive nearly $2 million of that money to focus research on students with emotional and behavioral health issues, according to the National Institute of Justice. Holder will also announce the expansion of the National Forum on Youth Violence Prevention to Baltimore; Long Beach, Calif.; Louisville, Ky.; and Seattle.
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NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2012
As authorities continued to investigate the shooting at Perry Hall High School, about two dozen students gathered at a church Monday night, recounting their fears during the incident - and a reluctance to go back to school. "You just think, if it happens once, it can happen again," said senior Kyle Ritter. He said he would welcome more security on campus: "If it's going to stop all this craziness, I think it'd be a good idea. " School safety experts say that while it's understandable for some to want metal detectors and other visible signs of beefed-up security, less invasive measures usually offer the best way to keep out guns and other dangerous weapons.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
At the front door of a home near Holabird Academy in Southeast Baltimore, new city schools CEO Gregory Thornton and the Baltimore Oriole Bird mascot greeted a gaggle of young children with fresh uniforms and backpacks, all ready for the first day of school. Thornton high-fived the children, his enthusiasm matching that of the grade-schoolers. He gestured toward the Oriole Bird. "Do you know that he's my friend?" "Oriole Bird your friend?" a tiny girl asked incredulously. Inside, a woman shrieked with laughter as the girl cautiously shook the mascot's hand.
NEWS
December 5, 2012
As a parent of a student at Cockeysville Middle School, I want to applaud the committed efforts of Dale Rauenzahn, head of safety and security for Baltimore County Public Schools, along with his colleagues who have implemented strong security measures at our school ("Baltimore Co. school veteran will lead new safety office," Oct. 29). After the recent violent incidents at several county schools, Mr. Rauenzahn and his team listened in person to concerned parents. We knew our school was an extremely safe place, but we wanted current security measures updated to ease worries that resulted from recent violence and threats in other schools.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2013
In the wake of the deadly bombings in Boston and the fertilizer plant explosion in West, Texas, the Maryland State Board of Education on Tuesday approved new emergency planning guidelines meant to help local school systems better prepare for disaster. "It's very timely that we're here today, given the events that occurred last week," said Chuck Buckler, executive director of the student services and strategic planning branch of the Maryland State Department of Education. The 218-page document updates safety guidelines developed a decade ago and emphasizes the creation of individualized plans that address multiple hazards, from school shootings to tornadoes.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2012
Baltimore County schools Superintendent Dallas Dance on Tuesday named a school safety chief, following two gun-related incidents at the beginning of the school year. Dale Rauenzahn, who has served school system's head of student support services, was appointed to the new position of executive director of school safety and security. Dance announced plans to create a safety office after the two cases involving guns. In August, a Perry Hall High School student was critically injured in a cafeteria shooting on the first day of school.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2013
Cameras that stream live to police stations and patrol cars, new entry systems in all schools and a state-of-the-art visitor identification system are part of a $3.7 million plan unveiled Tuesday to improve security in Baltimore County public schools. "We have no greater responsibility as leaders than to protect our children when they go to school each and every day," said County Executive Kevin Kamenetz in announcing the proposal at a news conference in Towson, where he was joined by Superintendent Dallas Dance, Police Chief Jim Johnson and County Council members.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder will visit Baltimore Wednesday night to announce $63 million in federal grants awarded to study school safety to reduce gun violence across the nation. Baltimore County Public Schools and the University of Maryland, Baltimore will receive nearly $2 million of that money to focus research on students with emotional and behavioral health issues, according to the National Institute of Justice. Holder will also announce the expansion of the National Forum on Youth Violence Prevention to Baltimore; Long Beach, Calif.; Louisville, Ky.; and Seattle.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2013
After an emotional day of testimony, Robert W. Gladden Jr., the 15-year-old charged in the Perry Hall High School cafeteria shooting, was sentenced Monday to 35 years in prison. Baltimore County Circuit Judge Robert E. Cahill Jr. went beyond state sentencing guidelines to put Gladden away until he is at least 50 years old, citing continued fear in Perry Hall along with a national concern for school safety that has grown stronger since the Newtown, Conn. school massacre. Kathleen Watkins, a school administrator, told the court that the school is still working to get past the shooting that injured Daniel Borowy, a 17-year-old special needs student, on the first day of school.
NEWS
August 25, 2014
This week, youngsters across Maryland will board the "big yellow cheese wagon," as it's sometimes called, and head back to school. And chances are high (aside perhaps from those teary-eyed moms and dads waving good-bye to their kindergartners for the first time), the school bus commute from home to classroom will take place without incident. But the latest survey conducted by the Maryland State Department of Education shows that the students' fate is being tempted on a regular basis by drivers who seem either unaware of the law or unwilling to follow it. Drivers are forbidden to pass a bus in either direction when its stop arm swings out and its lights are flashing, yet that happens all the time.
NEWS
June 7, 2014
After reading the article, "Council members facing difficult tests," (June 5), I have to disagree with Wade Kach. As a resident of Cockeysville, I can tell you that Councilman Todd Huff has been extremely successful with numerous community issues from halting a huge development in our residential neighborhood on Pot Spring Road to addressing numerous school safety concerns in our public schools. He has visited our school on numerous occasions to witness our concerns, then acted to improve the quality of the school community quickly.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2014
Rumors that a shooting would occur at Gen. John Stricker Middle School on Friday spread quickly over social media the night before, resulting in a message being sent to Baltimore County Superintendent Dallas Dance via Twitter. Dance, who has 10,000 Twitter followers, was sent a tweet at 9:31 p.m. saying, "Do something about this. " The message included a screen shot of another tweet that said, "Apparently there is a planned shooting supposed to happen at Stricker tomorrow. " Dance said he saw the tweet three minutes later and called administrators in charge of school safety.
NEWS
By Jon Meoli, jmeoli@tribune.com | February 24, 2014
After the success of last year's fundraiser in memory of her daughter, Josephine "Joey" Gay, who died in the Sandy Hook Elementary School shootings, Michele Gay wants to continue the momentum with a second fundraiser to fuel a safe schools initiative. So the Columbia native was in the area last week to meet with volunteers to work on Joey's Second Annual Purple Ball and visit the offices of Vice President Joe Biden and Connecticut Sen. Richard Blumenthal on behalf of Safe and Sound: A Sandy Hook Initiative - the pending nonprofit formed by six Sandy Hook mothers that has grown into a national advocate for school safety and security.
NEWS
February 17, 2014
Every year, hundreds of Baltimore City teachers are injured at work by violent or unruly students, and many school employees believe such incidents have become more common in recent years as a result of the policies aimed a keeping troublesome students in class rather than suspending them. If that's the case in some schools, the policy is being misapplied. Reducing suspensions does not mean abandoning discipline or turning a blind eye to violence. Schools can still suspend fewer students without compromising school safety if teachers receive better training and principals support them by encouraging them to report violence and injuries promptly.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2014
School districts across the nation will be able to apply for competitive grants to develop or update their school safety plans, U.S. Sen. Barbara Mikulski announced Wednesday in Baltimore County. The new Comprehensive School Safety Initiative will provide $50 million to school districts across the country who want to train and hire school personnel and buy equipment to improve school safety. Another $25 million will be used for research into analyzing the causes of school violence, including the gaps in mental health for students and their exposure to violence.
NEWS
June 3, 2008
The Baltimore school system will host three forums this week on school safety. The forums will be held from 6 p.m. 8 p.m. tonight at Digital Harbor High School, 1100 Covington St.; from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday at Mergenthaler Vocational-Technical High School, 3500 Hillen Road; and from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Saturday at Frederick Douglass High School, 2301 Gwynns Falls Parkway. The forums are to follow an invitation-only summit on school safety to be hosted today by state Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick and Rep. Elijah E. Cummings.
NEWS
November 12, 2013
For years, the Maryland Department of Education has been urging the state's school systems to reduce the number of out-of-school suspensions teachers and principals use to discipline disruptive or troublesome students. Under new guidelines issued last year, state school Superintendent Lillian M. Lowery asked educators to reserve suspension as a punishment of last resort to be used only after every other alternative had been exhausted. Kicking kids out of school rarely solves anything, because when those youngsters return, whatever it was that originally caused their bad behavior is likely to come right back with them.
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