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School Redistricting

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September 19, 2013
Does the Howard County Public School System hate the poor? Consider the languishing schools in Columbia juxtaposed against the palatial new schools elsewhere. The latest act of animus toward the poor is robbing Wilde Lake Middle School of its long-overdue expansion/renovation. How will they accomplish this? By redistricting the wealthy into Clarksville, leaving Wilde Lake Middle School with a building that doesn't meet current standards, fewer staff and contributing families, and increasing its already high percentage of low-income families.
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NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | March 2, 2014
A year and a half into the tenure of the superintendent they hired for his communication skills, Baltimore County school board members probably did not expect such an uproar. Protesters rang cowbells, blew horns and chanted in the cold night air outside a recent board meeting while inside the drab administration building frustration and emotion poured out as one speaker after another criticized decisions made by Superintendent Dallas Dance. School board meetings this winter have been filled with expressions of discontent from those who don't believe their point of view has been considered.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2012
Southern Anne Arundel County residents whose children would be affected by the redistricting of three elementary schools offered emotional testimony before the county school board Tuesday night, with most arguing that the redistricting isn't necessary. Dozens turned out for the hearing at South River High School regarding Superintendent Kevin Maxwell's recommendation, which would shift some pupils from Central to Davidsonville and Mayo elementary schools to relieve overcrowding. Most speakers were parents of pupils at Central Elementary.
NEWS
November 25, 2013
It seems strange that parents who objected to the original Howard County middle school redistricting plan had months to provide feedback and work with Superintendent Renee Foose on changes, yet those of us who are now objecting to parts of her revised plan have had less than a month to provide our feedback and, even worse, the county board of education voted recently voted to ignore it ( "Foose's middle school redistricting plan backed by board," ...
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,Sun Staff Writer | March 2, 1995
Eastport parents criticized a proposed redistricting plan last night, saying their neighborhood elementary school is too small to accommodate children from a nearby public housing development."
NEWS
November 24, 1992
School redistricting plans always turn ugly. A proposal to move Severn Elementary pupils to the Meade Senior High feeder system is no exception.Severn Elementary parents are bitterly opposed, and, in many ways, their feelings are justified. Switching schools can be a disruptive, upsetting experience for children, and inequities between schools are a fact. These are sensible reasons for fighting redistricting.Unfortunately, redistricting usually devolves into emotional turmoil until all rational arguments are lost in irrational panic.
NEWS
March 27, 1996
TO RESOLVE the overcrowding at Westminster's West Middle School, the Carroll County Board of Education's proposed solution creates more problems than it solves. The plan should be shelved and reconsidered.To alleviate overcrowding at West Middle -- where 1,289 students are crammed into a school designed for 995 -- the proposal calls for moving dozens of Westminster children miles from their homes to Northwest Middle School in Taneytown. By doing so, the county system might also undermine the case for a new Westminster middle school.
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Staff Writer | March 1, 1993
The principal of Wilde Lake High School wants the school board to speed up school redistricting, shifting high school boundary lines in the fall instead of in September 1994.To Principal Bonnie Daniel and her staff, "it matters because we would like our numbers to go up next year," she said at a community meeting last week. She said her school has difficulty offering a variety of courses because its student body is relatively small.Wilde Lake is about 80 students short of its 910-student capacity and is projected to remain so for the next 10 years if no changes are made.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Kris Antonelli, Howard Libit and Jackie Powder contributed to this article | March 28, 1998
Anne Darr's three children will likely attend eight public schools by the time they graduate from high school, though the family's Howard County address hasn't changed for nearly two decades.It's called school redistricting, and it's an explosive issue in the suburbs."It's to the point where I need a refrigerator magnet to remember where I should send my kids that day," Darr says with a sigh about transporting her children, Clare and Suzy Herlihy, who are in school.Booming development in the Darrs' Clarksville neighborhood has forced Howard school officials to draw new district lines every few years to juggle enrollment and minimize crowding.
EXPLORE
September 19, 2013
Does the Howard County Public School System hate the poor? Consider the languishing schools in Columbia juxtaposed against the palatial new schools elsewhere. The latest act of animus toward the poor is robbing Wilde Lake Middle School of its long-overdue expansion/renovation. How will they accomplish this? By redistricting the wealthy into Clarksville, leaving Wilde Lake Middle School with a building that doesn't meet current standards, fewer staff and contributing families, and increasing its already high percentage of low-income families.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2013
Anne Arundel County school officials moved forward this week with plans to redistrict schools in the Crofton area without provisions for a possible $38 million elementary school in Odenton - which developers had pledged to build if an age-restriction covenant were lifted to allow a new development. On Wednesday, the school board voted to take to a public hearing a plan crafted by a redistricting committee and proposed by Superintendent Kevin Maxwell that would address overcrowding at Nantucket Elementary School in Crofton.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2012
Southern Anne Arundel County residents whose children would be affected by the redistricting of three elementary schools offered emotional testimony before the county school board Tuesday night, with most arguing that the redistricting isn't necessary. Dozens turned out for the hearing at South River High School regarding Superintendent Kevin Maxwell's recommendation, which would shift some pupils from Central to Davidsonville and Mayo elementary schools to relieve overcrowding. Most speakers were parents of pupils at Central Elementary.
EXPLORE
By Doug Miller, dmiller@patuxent.com | September 22, 2011
I've always said school redistricting was a thankless job (you can look it up). It has to be done periodically because populations shift inevitably. But no matter how you do it, some will be convinced that officials of the school system don't give a hoot about their kids and are bent upon tearing apart neighborhoods for the sake of their own convenience or worse. So I can appreciate why Joel Gallihue, the county's manager of school planning, took exception to an editorial we ran recently bemoaning the county's ability to accurately predict the shifts in school populations and urging the county executive to appoint a panel to figure out ways to improve the methodology.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2011
After four years without moving school district boundaries, Howard County parents and children can expect numerous rounds of redistricting for the rest of this decade, school officials told County Council members at a meeting Wednesday morning. The change comes because of housing trends, in which the recession cut off the previous decade's fast growth in western county schools. That left scores of seats empty in new school buildings as homebuyers concentrated on lower-priced townhouses and condominiums going up in the redeveloping eastern county, where thousands more new homes are expected.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2011
The Anne Arundel County Board of Education voted Wednesday to approve redistricting plans for Fort Meade and to formally oppose the county's efforts to avoid paying $15 million to the district as required by state laws. The redistricting plan, formulated by parents, residents and school system officials, would use the current West Meade Elementary School building as an early education center for Early Childhood Intervention, pre-kindergarten and kindergarten students. The center would serve students assigned to West Meade, Manor View and Pershing Hill elementaries.
NEWS
By Brent Jones | brent.jones@baltsun.com | January 21, 2010
The majority of children living in Rodgers Forge would not be forced to transfer to the new West Towson Elementary School if the school board accepts the recommendation that a redistricting committee approved Wednesday night. About 150 people attended the open forum, waving green signs encouraging members of the boundary committee to vote for "Proposal G," which won by a 7-3 vote and was considered by many Rodgers Forge Elementary parents to be the least disruptive of four proposed options.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,nicole.fuller@baltsun.com | December 7, 2008
Anne Arundel County School Superintendent Kevin M. Maxwell has presented the school board with plans to redistrict schools in the South County and Mountain Road areas of the county, attempting to disrupt as few community schools as possible and remedy many of the area's overcrowding issues using magnet schools. Maxwell's recommendations for the South County closely mirror those of a committee made up of community leaders and parents who studied the issue there. However, Maxwell largely veered from the panel's recommendations for the Mountain Road corridor, choosing to keep most students in their current home districts and feeder system, with hopes that he can solve some of the area's space problems with magnet schools and programs that would attract voluntary student transfers.
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