Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSchool Projects
IN THE NEWS

School Projects

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2010
Some Anne Arundel County school board members anticipate that Superintendent Kevin Maxwell's $159 million, fiscal year 2012 capital budget proposal — an increase of about $36 million from last fiscal year — will likely come up short of being completely funded. After hearing the proposal Wednesday, board members questioned how many of the more than three dozen prioritized projects on the proposal would end up being shelved for another year. The capital budget sets funding priorities for the school system's construction projects.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Joe Burris and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
As the Board of Education gave its blessing last week to Superintendent George Arlotto's $163.4 million capital budget request, officials said some projects in the budget may affect coming redistricting efforts in the Annapolis area. Two elementary schools in the Annapolis school cluster, Rolling Knolls and West Annapolis, are among facilities targeted for upgrades as part of the capital budget plan. West Annapolis Elementary is the subject of a $24 million modernization that will increase enrollment capacity from 274 students to 314. Construction is underway, and the renovated school is expected to open in August 2106.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2013
The list is long enough to give contractors a stiff workout. There are roof repairs and resurfacing due for Georgetown East Elementary School and painting for George Fox Middle School. Mills-Parole Elementary will get tiles, carpet and terrazzo. Crofton Elementary is due for kitchen equipment and fire sprinklers. Those are just some of the more than two dozen projects that the Anne Arundel County Board of Education approved this week as consent items — they are funded, and the board has given its blessing for them to be awarded to contractors.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
George Arlotto this week became the third Anne Arundel County superintendent in as many years submitting a capital budget proposal - but he said working within the school system for 10 years helped him hammer out the $163.4 million request. "Not a lot of changes were made, based on what we've done in the past and where we're headed in the future," said Arlotto, who was the system's chief of staff before becoming superintendent in July. Arlotto replaced Mamie Perkins, who served as an interim superintendent for a year while the school district sought a permanent replacement for seven-year Superintendent Kevin Maxwell.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | October 23, 1999
ONE RECENT WEEKDAY evening I was racing down the Jones Falls Expressway with my eye on the clock and my 14-year-old son in the front seat of the car. The kid and I were running out of time and light. We had to get to a cemetery before sundown.Why would anyone need to get to a cemetery before dark? If you guessed "last-minute school project," you must be a veteran parent. As a veteran, you know the basics of this drama.Basic No. 1: Procrastination: Even though the assignment was made some time ago, the kid becomes concerned about it only as the deadline nears.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN STAFF | March 16, 1999
Concerned by cost overruns and other problems in the board of education's $106 million school construction program, Carroll County Commissioner Robin Bartlett Frazier called yesterday for more government control over school projects."
NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson and Thomas W. Waldron and M. Dion Thompson and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | January 11, 2000
Setting up a battle with the construction industry and county governments, Gov. Parris N. Glendening proposed yesterday to extend state law to require that union-scale wages be paid on school-building projects. Following through on a 1998 campaign pledge to trade unions that endorsed his re-election, Glendening said he would seek to remove a "quirk" that exempts many school-construction projects from the state's prevailing wage law. "We believe that the men and women building our schools out there ought to be paid a wage where they can support a family," the governor said.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | September 6, 1996
After years of having some of the most outdated schools in the county, western Carroll residents are going to see new walls going up.And because they know it will be a few decades before this much school building and renovation happen again, they're pushing for what they feel is their fair share.Two school projects proposed for western Carroll -- a building to replace Elmer Wolfe Elementary School and a renovation of Francis Scott Key High School -- will cost more than school officials originally had hoped.
NEWS
By LARRY CARSON and LARRY CARSON,SUN REPORTER | April 2, 2006
In proposing a record $336.6 million capital budget for the coming year -- a 39 percent increase over last year -- Howard County Executive James N. Robey said school projects remain his primary interest, even though he trimmed requests for school renovations. "My highest priority continues to be to build the schools Howard County needs to maintain our education system as the best in the state," he said Friday, suggesting that an extra $5 million expected in state school construction money could be used to help fill the gap. The overall budget grew mainly because of water, sewer and road projects financed from self-supporting utility and excise taxes.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | November 19, 2004
In the first round of the state's school construction awards, most of Carroll County's major projects did not receive funding, local officials learned yesterday. Of the $100 million the state will make available for fiscal year 2006 for building or renovating schools, Carroll so far has received $794,000 for the renovation of 48-year-old North Carroll Middle School. That nearly $20 million project began in January and will be finished by next November. "We will get the last payment on the middle school, and so far that is the only thing we are getting," Ted Zaleski, county director of management and budget, said yesterday.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich and Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2014
Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz released a budget proposal Tuesday that he says is part of a long-term plan to eliminate school overcrowding, resulting in a surplus of classroom seats by 2021. The county could face a shortage of 1,400 seats by then without aggressive funding, said Kamenetz, whose proposal was the final budget address of his current term. "If there is a shortage of seats, that means more trailers and larger class sizes," the county executive said at a news briefing before the budget unveiling.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | February 20, 2014
After years of lumbering to Annapolis like a brain-starved zombie in search of a fight, the Harford County delegation to the Maryland General Assembly has begun to show signs not only of life, but also of civilized behavior. The occasion came this month, early enough in the 90-day session that, if the pulse can be sustained, it may be possible for the generally dysfunctional group to accomplish something meaningful. The impetus for the unusual behavior among our local legislators - behavior generally considered normal for the small-to-medium-sized delegations representing Maryland's counties - was the recent failure of Harford County Public Schools to send a representative to a state board of public works meeting.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2013
Every principal can use an extra set of hands, but Mary Donnelly of Baltimore's John Ruhrah Elementary/Middle School never imagined she'd have 80. School leaders from across the country took to the Southeast Baltimore school's yard Wednesday, building a new playground to replace one whose missing pieces and decrepit structure had become a safety hazard. "I'm overwhelmed — but in a good way," said Donnelly, who has led the school for 12 years. "This is a gathering place for our community, and I'm a firm believer in kids getting outside.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2013
The Anne Arundel County Council vote this week to trim $5 million from the school's capital budget has led school officials to allege that the cut was retaliation for a squabble last year. On Wednesday, after the school board reviewed more than three dozen projects in jeopardy because of the cuts, Superintendent Kevin Maxwell said the board now has "the most contentious relationship we've had with the council. " "How we're going to work together going forward is as much a question as where we are now," Maxwell said.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2013
The list is long enough to give contractors a stiff workout. There are roof repairs and resurfacing due for Georgetown East Elementary School and painting for George Fox Middle School. Mills-Parole Elementary will get tiles, carpet and terrazzo. Crofton Elementary is due for kitchen equipment and fire sprinklers. Those are just some of the more than two dozen projects that the Anne Arundel County Board of Education approved this week as consent items — they are funded, and the board has given its blessing for them to be awarded to contractors.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2012
The Baltimore City Council and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake have enacted a zoning ordinance that will allow a former Catholic school in Southwest Baltimore to be converted into a convalescent home for homeless people. Project PLASE (People Lacking Ample Shelter and Employment), a 30-year-old nonprofit based in Charles North, has offered more than $1 million for the former St. Joseph's Monastery school buildings in the 3500 block of Old Frederick Road. The school was closed by the Archdiocese of Baltimore in 2010.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | March 1, 1996
Anne Arundel County budget officials say the rebuilding of two elementary schools in the crowded Pasadena corridor should be delayed from next year to 1998.They also recommended yesterday delaying the construction of seven schools and that no county money be spent on school construction planning next year, angering school officials and legislators from the northern part of the county.School board President Joseph H. Foster called the proposals "just unacceptable.""It shows a total lack of understanding of what is really needed," he said.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2012
State officials approved more than $161 million in school construction funding Wednesday that will allow school systems in the Baltimore area to undertake renovation projects, tackling problems that include sweltering and overcrowded classrooms and dilapidated buildings and amenities. The Maryland Board of Public Works approved the last round of construction dollars being doled out to schools for fiscal year 2013. The state approved $187.5 million in funding in January, bringing the total amount for school construction projects to nearly $350 million, a more than $85 million increase from fiscal year 2012.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2012
Angry phone calls began pouring into The Sun a few months ago, describing renovations that were taking shape in the Baltimore City school system's information technology department as fit for the executive of a private corporation. Meanwhile, city school officials and advocacy organizations were in the heart of the Maryland General Assembly, passionately pushing a borrowing proposal that would leverage millions for school construction and renovation of the system's decrepit facilities.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.