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February 21, 2010
Speaker and juggler Jesse Joyner visits Woods Memorial Presbyterian Church, 611 Baltimore Annapolis Blvd., at 9:30 a.m. today to tell the story of Jesus Christ. Call 410-647-2550 for more information.
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By Julie Scharper and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
They are as well-versed in 3-D printing, weaving and the anthropology of fashion as they are in classic looks from Chanel and Dior. Students in the Maryland Institute College of Art s fibers program approach fashion from an unusual perspective. Although the college does not offer a traditional fashion design curriculum, graduates are creating inventive garments informed by education rooted in a sensual - and intellectual - understanding of textiles. "Fashion is a cultural force that relates to how we communicate ideas, values, fears and aspirations, our sense of belonging, and our ideas around gender and class," said fibers department chair Valeska Populoh.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2010
Nathan Holloway, 14, has spent his boyhood on the family farm in Darlington and plans to spend his high school years laying the groundwork for a future in agriculture. "I want to live my life in an agricultural business," said Nathan. "My grandparents and my parents grew up on the farm. I want to get a solid background and stay on the farm. " As a member of the first class in Harford County's Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences magnet program, he soon will apply all the practical experience from life on 100-acre livestock farm and orchard to course work.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2014
Sidewalks and paths used by elementary and middle school students across Maryland will be upgraded with $3.4 million in federal grant funding, state officials announced Tuesday. The federal Transportation Alternatives Program funding will be administered by the State Highway Administration and used for 16 projects shortlisted under the state's Safe Routes to School Program, officials said. Grants under the program, which are awarded to local jurisdictions annually, are aimed at improving safety for young students who walk or bike to school.
SPORTS
By Matt Bracken and The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2012
Mark Karcher's hiatus from local high school basketball is coming to an end. Starting this fall, Karcher will lead the varsity boys program at Bluford Drew Jemison STEM Academy. The former St. Frances coach's first-year program is located on the old Walbrook campus in West Baltimore. Karcher, who said in November that his departure from St. Frances was a “forced resignation,” has some familiarity with the Bluford system. Karcher's son attends the school's East Baltimore campus, and one of his former Panthers assistants - Marcus Wise - is the boys JV coach.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | February 13, 2014
Officials from the Chesapeake Science Point Public Charter School in Hanover came to a school board meeting this month eager to discover whether their fledgling high school program would be allowed to continue. Even before the meeting began, they must have known they had reason for optimism. School board members had been boasting somewhat about the school — during an earlier presentation before the county delegation, where lawmakers suggested Anne Arundel should have a 13th high school, board members responded that a 13th high school already existed: Chesapeake Science Point.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 23, 1993
The Chapter 1 program, the federal government's main effort to help bolster the basic academic skills of poor children, was called outdated yesterday by two new studies, the second and third reports in three months to criticize the program's effectiveness.One new report, released by the National Assessment of Chapter 1, concluded that the program did not do enough to help students improve their skills or to properly assess students' progress. It also said some of the program's money was misdirected or poorly spent.
NEWS
April 27, 2009
Declining revenues at the Erickson School of aging studies left University of Maryland, Baltimore County administrators few choices. Despite the increasing need for such expertise in a fast-graying America, the program attracted only a modest number of students and donations were down. Laying off a significant share of its faculty recently may have been a financial necessity in these tough economic times, but it's a shame. This field has tremendous potential for growth, and the demographics of the country explain why. The program was created four years ago with a $5 million donation from the Erickson Foundation, an outgrowth of the Catonsville-based company of retirement communities, and a matching state grant.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Staff Writer | September 3, 1992
The eighth-grade rappers who make up the wildly popular group Kris Kross will be taking a bit of Baltimore with them on their 29-city concert tour.Chris Kelly, half of the duo that has young fans wearing their pants baggy and backward, has enrolled in the Calvert School's home-instruction program. In town for the tour's debut last night, the 14-year-old also visited the North Baltimore school yesterday afternoon."It's all right. It's cool," Chris said in that taciturn adolescent style when asked about his new school.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | February 3, 1997
Eight-year-old Timothy Scherer wants to be a football player when he grows up, or maybe a soccer player.Last week, though, he got a taste of a different career -- as part of a new program that could spread to all Baltimore County schools. The Fifth District Elementary School third-grader and his class worked with a volunteer, a retired engineer, perfecting model cars they had built for a competition.The goal: a car safe enough to keep an egg intact even after a run down a steep wooden track that ends abruptly in a wooden wall.
NEWS
Erica L. Green | June 8, 2014
Baltimore school officials want to attract more highly effective teachers and raise awareness about attendance in summer school after the percentage of middle and high school students successfully completing academic programs plummeted last year. The number of middle school students promoted to the next grade fell precipitously, according to data recently released by the school system, spurring questions about the effectiveness of the Building Educated Leaders for Life program. Building Educated Leaders for Life, referred to by its acronym BELL, a national model that had previously posted encouraging results, runs the city's middle school summer program.
NEWS
By Patricia Schultheis | May 19, 2014
About a dozen years ago, when the church I attend launched a mentoring program at Baltimore's Dickey Hill Elementary School, my long association with Jabril Leach began. The second-grader had a passion for dinosaurs, a severe speech impediment and a mother in prison - a situation requiring firm boundaries, lest Jabril regard me as a substitute parent.  I determined that my role would be to establish trust but not dependency. So, armed with checkers, some crayons - Jabril loved to draw - and "Ping," a book about a Chinese duck, Jabril and I met week after week in the school's hallway and got to know each other.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | February 14, 2014
Harford County government and Lower Susquehanna Heritage Greenway will host a workshop next week to highlight four state programs that support trails, pedestrian and bicycle projects. Representatives of the Maryland Department of Transportation and State Highway Administration will discuss the programs during the workshop on Thursday, Feb. 20, from 3 to 5 p.m. at the Harford County Council chambers, 212 S. Bond St. in Bel Air. The Recreational Trails Program (RTP), Transportation Alternatives Program (TAP)
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | February 13, 2014
Officials from the Chesapeake Science Point Public Charter School in Hanover came to a school board meeting this month eager to discover whether their fledgling high school program would be allowed to continue. Even before the meeting began, they must have known they had reason for optimism. School board members had been boasting somewhat about the school — during an earlier presentation before the county delegation, where lawmakers suggested Anne Arundel should have a 13th high school, board members responded that a 13th high school already existed: Chesapeake Science Point.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | November 17, 2013
Those familiar with my life story understand my emotional approach to educational opportunity - particularly where the story line ends in opportunity denied. Simply put, I got lucky at a tender age. Enough athletic and academic prowess, in addition to scholarship aid, gave me the opportunity to attend excellent schools. These institutions set me on a successful path; each afforded me unlimited opportunities and important relationships that I have taken advantage of throughout my life.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2013
One of the first things that needed changing was the hard floor. Jillian Barber could scarcely believe that she'd been hired to launch Annapolis High School's dance program in a room that clearly was not suited for dance. So she started from the bottom: first the floor, then other equipment and additional mirrors on all four walls. And still only six students showed up to try out for the school's first after-school dance company nine years ago. "Only three had any idea of what they were showing up for," said Barber.
NEWS
By CASSANDRA A. FORTIN and CASSANDRA A. FORTIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 18, 2006
Pupils at Youth's Benefit Elementary School perused the school grounds before settling on a barren area by the Fallston school's front entrance to plant a garden. After the space was tilled, they planted native plants, such as bee balm, hydrangeas and black-eyed Susans. Next, they spread mulch. They also set up two barrels to collect rainwater that drains from the roof of the school. Just a few days after planting the garden, they saw results. "I think the children have some sort of magic powers," said Karen DeHart, a teacher in the gifted-and-talented program at Youth's Benefit.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | April 18, 1997
The small, mop-haired 6-year-old wears glasses that make his eyes look big, but you can't see them much because he keeps his head down a lot. He barely speaks and, when spoken to, slips down in his chair. Sometimes, he slides under the table.That's when one of the therapists at Lansdowne's tiny Therapeutic After School Program -- one of two in Baltimore County -- will say something, very casually, to nudge the boy back into the group of six.School officials say the programs, run by Catholic Charities' Villa Maria organization, produce remarkable improvements in troubled children.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2013
When Annapolis High School senior Aidee Serrano was struggling to learn both English and Spanish while in elementary and middle school, her mother Elsa always lent a hand with homework — even though she spoke little English herself. Now, Aidee is a National Honor Society student at Annapolis High and helping her mother — and others — learn English in a free adult education program called Community Plaza, which serves as an outreach drop-in center used primarily by Annapolis' Latino community.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun and By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2013
It's a gorgeous September afternoon, and students at the SEED School of Baltimore are spending it just like countless peers across the country - donning their home colors to play a game of football. Classmates drift across campus to watch, sitting beside proud parents. It's a slice of Americana in the heart of Southwest Baltimore. This scene would not be possible without Ed Reed. Reed's foundation donated the money to start a football program at SEED, a public boarding school for at-risk youths on the former campus of Southwestern High.
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