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NEWS
December 28, 1992
When C. Scott Stone took his new seat on the Carroll Count school board this month, he offered a preview of the kind of businesslike approach he promised voters in the November election.He asked for a delay in voting on a new policy to make the county schools superintendent's contract a matter of public record, to allow the board to hear public comment and to follow strict board procedures.That is the type of sound approach badly needed on this highly controversial issue.Mr. Stone unseated board President Cheryl A. McFalls by arguing for public contract disclosure, which Mrs. McFalls had opposed, so his call for delay does not imply opposition to the policy.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 18, 2014
Kudos to your reporters for exposing reality as it exists in many schoolhouses ( "Painful lessons: Run-ins with students take toll on teachers, city finances," Feb. 16). I realize this expose is part of a long range look into workman's compensation, but to many readers the revelations are like Upton Sinclair's novel, The Jungle about the meatpacking industry, where the author famously said, "I aimed at their hearts, but hit their stomachs instead. " The riotous conditions existing in many classrooms have been hushed for years.
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NEWS
October 23, 1995
CARROLL COUNTY'S education department gave itself an unnecessary black eye when it refused to allow 13-year-old Derek Roll to enroll in school for seven weeks. As soon as his case was publicized, school bureaucrats permitted the seventh grader to attend Sykesville Middle School and his situation has been resolved.This is not the first such incident. Last year, after a family had to temporarily locate in Baltimore County after their Carroll home had burned down, there was some doubt about whether officials would allow the children to continue their schooling in the county even though the parents were rebuilding in Carroll.
NEWS
February 5, 2014
The State Board of Education passed a new school discipline policy that will have far-reaching effects on every subdivision in Maryland. Your editorial in support of the new policy was both predictable and disheartening ( "Keep them in class," Jan. 29). The new policy was favored by the Open Society Institute, Advocates for Children & Youth, the NAACP and the ACLU. It was opposed by teachers, principals, administrators, superintendents and most local boards of education. Gov. Martin O'Malley, U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan and U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder also favor the new policy.
NEWS
By Dianne Williams Hayes and Dianne Williams Hayes,Staff writer | September 5, 1991
A county group known to be outspoken on matters regarding sex education and abortion came out in support of Northeast principal Joseph Carducci during a school board meeting yesterday, applauding his reported stand on abortion and urging other parents to follow suit.MaryErvin, president of CARE-MD, told the board that Carducci was actingin the best interest of students."The intense dislike that these Northeast High School parents feel for their principal has blinded them to the fact that Mr. Carducci has the best interest of their children at heart," she said.
SPORTS
By Bill Free and Bill Free,SUN STAFF | March 27, 1996
Eight top players from 10th-ranked McDonogh's boys lacrosse team have been suspended for seven games for violating school policy during a spring break trip through Virginia and North Carolina March 9-12.The suspensions for drinking alcohol were handed down by school officials March 20 after an investigation into the incident that cut the trip to play a series of exhibitions and games short by four days.McDonogh athletic director Jack McMullen said last night: "Sometimes good kids make bad decisions and many of them were the better players on the team.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | April 16, 1998
Is a head-wrap the same as a hat? Is cultural attire protected as constitutional free speech?Such questions surfaced yesterday when a Columbia mother and her ACLU lawyer met with Howard County school Superintendent Michael E. Hickey to discuss whether her 14-year-old daughter's African-style head-wrap violates school policy that bars hats as "disruptive."Hickey, accompanied by a school system attorney, asked Shermia Isaacs to return to school Monday after spring break without the wrap and promised he would clarify the school policy by this fall.
NEWS
By Dianne Williams Hayes and Dianne Williams Hayes,Staff writer | September 26, 1991
Members of the Parent Teacher Association at George Cromwell Elementary had little trouble Tuesday night getting signatures on four petitions complaining about the school system's priorities.A slight drizzle outside the Ferndale School didn't deter 150 parents from the program organized to familiarize everyone with classroom rules and school policy. Nearly every parent signed petitions complaining about the state's school performance program, and asking for in-school chorusinstruction and head-lice checks by county health personnel.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | March 14, 1996
State police arrested a 9-year-old boy at Piney Ridge Elementary School in Sykesville on Tuesday, charging him with threatening two other boys with a "homemade knife."No one was injured by the weapon, which was half a pair of scissors with tape wrapped around one end, said 1st Sgt. Charles Mays, a state police spokesman.The boy was charged with assault and battery and carrying a deadly weapon, then released to his parents, police said.But a friend of the arrested boy's family said she believes school and police overreacted.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | May 28, 1998
Amid heightened national concern about violence in schools, a 15-year-old boy was arrested yesterday after he brought an unloaded Colt semiautomatic handgun in his backpack to Hereford Middle School in Monkton and an eight-round magazine of ammunition was found in his gym locker, police and school officials said.The eighth-grader, whose name was not released by police or school officials, was charged as a juvenile with possessing a handgun illegally and taken to the Charles H. Hickey Jr. School for juvenile offenders, police said.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2014
Sarah Rupert-Sullivan knew she shouldn't have been shocked her same-sex wedding was excluded from Notre Dame Prep's alumnae class notes. But she was. "To be kind of candid about it," she said, "I was pissed. " Now, she has launched a petition against a school editorial policy which she says discriminates against LGBT people by not giving equal treatment to same-sex and opposite-sex married couples. Rupert-Sullivan, who graduated from Notre Dame Prep in 2003 but now lives in Philadelphia, married her wife Molly in Frederick last August.
NEWS
By Yohnny Raich | June 3, 2013
For decades, teacher tenure has been known as a protection given to teachers not only as a means to encourage innovation, but as an incentive for young individuals to enter the teaching profession. However, tenure has also brought about a problem. As school budgets across the state are being stressed due to lack of funding (both on the county and state levels), district administrators have turned to a policy of involuntary transfer, also known as teacher "excess. " Because the county is unable to find the funds to hire new teachers, teachers are shuffled to schools where vacancies must be filled.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2012
The Baltimore school system is looking into whether an event held at a public charter school to promote passage of a question on the Nov. 6 ballot was an improper use of facilities to promote a political cause. Advocates of the Dream Act, a measure that would extend in-state college tuition to the children of illegal immigrants, held a news conference Tuesday afternoon with U.S. Rep. Elijah Cummings at the Patterson Park Public Charter School on North Lakewood Avenue. But in response to a reporter's inquiry, a school system spokeswoman said the event may have been held in violation of the district's policy.
NEWS
March 12, 2012
Recent articles and editorials touched on some of the relationship between school hours and suspension rates and teenagers' biological clocks and the benefits of keeping kids in school ("How early is too early for high school students," March 8; "Suspension as a last resort," March 5). But they omitted any discussion of how high school students should be spending their afternoons. By the end of eleventh grade, the average public school student in Maryland has acquired most of the credits that they will need to graduate.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2012
The attorney for Todd Bozeman said Monday that university administrators violated the Morgan State men's basketball coach's contract and school policy regarding disciplining senior staff members when they placed the 48-year-old coach on paid administrative leave Sunday night. Ricky Lefft, a South Carolina-based attorney, said that neither he nor Bozeman has been made aware by school officials as to why the coach was suspended, and that not being allowed to appeal any action taken against Bozeman was a violation of the contract he signed in 2009.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2011
The Baltimore County school board is expected to vote Tuesday night on a revised facilities policy that would allow PTAs and community groups to hold craft fairs and bingo games that had been in jeopardy. Responding to a deluge of public complaints, the school system has rewritten the policy and rule twice so that most of the uses that community groups lobbied for will be allowed. Members of school PTAs became upset last year when school administrators began enforcing the policy, which prohibited third-party vendors from earning profits at county schools.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | November 22, 1995
The Baltimore County school board wrestled last night with policies meant to regulate student behavior and ensure that disciplinary action is applied consistently.But after an hour of debate, the board took no specific action. Rather, it endorsed the direction the schools are taking in response to a lengthy behavior report made public in June.The behavior study, compiled by an independent committee headed by former Baltimore County Police Chief Cornelius Behan, found that county schools were not violent and were safe considering the size of the system.
NEWS
By NEWSDAY | June 7, 2001
A man has been awarded $312,000 by a jury for the brutal hazing he received six years ago as an undergraduate cadet at a college in Vermont that specializes in turning out officers for the Navy and the Coast Guard. Keith Briscoe, 23, of Islip, N.Y., had sued Norwich University in Northfield, Vt., for the pain and suffering that he said he endured during about 100 incidents of hazing in the 2 1/2 months he was at the private school in 1995. The university, founded in 1819, is one of the oldest schools in the country specializing in training military officers.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2011
Parents and community leaders will ask the Baltimore County Council for help Monday as they fight to continue holding craft fairs and other fundraisers in county schools. The county Board of Education policy, which bars third-party vendors from earning profits at county schools, has drawn strong criticism. More than a dozen opponents are planning to ask the council to take action on the rule, which they call misguided, economically unsound and unfriendly to the community. "It is not smart policy or smart government, particularly in these lean times," said Eric Rockel, president of the Greater Timonium Community Council, which includes about 50 neighborhood associations.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2011
Baltimore City Council members called Thursday for strengthened policies and supervision of school transportation for special-needs students — a discussion spurred by the death of a 6-year-old who fell from the back of a moving school bus last month. In a hearing called by the council's education committee, experts and parents also criticized school bus practices and procedures as insufficient in meeting the needs of special-education students, who make up the majority of students carried by city-owned and -contracted yellow school buses.
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