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By Linda Linley and Linda Linley,SUN STAFF | February 5, 2002
Some Friends School parents want to know why the school's popular headmaster is leaving, and worry about how his departure will affect the school and its students. Angered by a letter dated Jan. 18 from the board of trustees announcing that Jon M. Harris would leave June 30, the parents say the board should explain why it dismissed Harris. Board chairman J. Kevin Carnell said that he and other trustees are not at liberty to discuss the details, but they have told parents that Harris' departure is a personnel matter and confidential.
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NEWS
By Erica L. Green and Alexander Pyles, The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2014
Baltimore school officials are investigating hazing allegations involving the Paul Laurence Dunbar High School football program, and parents are protesting the possibility that the school's celebrated coach might be removed. School officials declined to give details about the allegations or the investigation's status, saying the inquiry is continuing. "As the CEO, my job is to come to the aid of children," interim schools CEO Tisha Edwards said in an interview. "If a child is hurt, disrespected, harmed in any form or fashion, it's my job to find out. " Edwards declined to elaborate.
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NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | December 21, 1996
Saying his budget won't bear a new aid program, Gov. Parris N. Glendening has turned down Catholic school parents seeking public money for their schools but held out an olive branch to the vocal lobby, offering to explore an effort to wire nonpublic schools for computers."
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | December 8, 2012
Who is Shawn Nowlin? Or perhaps we should be asking: Why can't the Baltimore school system answer that question? It's been almost two weeks since Nowlin, who worked in some still-undetermined capacity at a Baltimore elementary and middle school, was charged in the rape of a 15-year-old girl he supposedly was counseling but instead impregnated. Prosecutors in Harford County, where the 27-year-old Nowlin lives, said he identified himself as a vice principal or "dean of students" at Hazelwood Elementary/Middle School in Northeast Baltimore — an obviously ludicrous title unless you believe there are also provosts of the playground at this level of the education system.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | June 11, 1997
Fearful that a renewed emphasis on academics in middle schools will reduce time for music and home economics, parents, teachers and students last night urged the Howard County school board to preserve instruction in those areas."
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1996
Catholic school parents across Maryland are writing letters to the governor in the first volley of a campaign by the Maryland Catholic Conference to get public dollars for private schools.Parents of the 60,000 children in the state's 179 Roman Catholic schools are asking Gov. Parris N. Glendening to put money in his fiscal 1998 budget to support transportation, textbooks and technology for students in nonpublic schools."The governor knows how many parents are out there. This is an effort to tell their story," said Mary Ellen Russell, associate director at the conference, the lobbying arm of the three dioceses with schools and churches in Maryland.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | April 8, 1998
Charles Carroll Elementary School isn't perfect. It lacks air conditioning, and the classrooms could be bigger. It's overcrowded, and the parking lot is too small.But these shortcomings aren't important to the students, parents and teachers at Carroll County's oldest and smallest school.They're devoted to the 69-year-old red-brick school perched above farmland and scattered newer homes about 10 miles north of Westminster. Their affection for the place has grown stronger since county school officials recommended sending some of Charles Carroll's students to another elementary school as part of the latest redistricting process.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | September 14, 1998
Pre-first: watered-down first grade or souped-up kindergarten?A gift of time or a theft of opportunity?A gentle boost for students not quite ready for school or an elitist strategy by parents trying to ensure that their children are at the top of their class?Wedged between kindergarten and first grade, pre-first can be all of the above, depending on one's perspective.In the Baltimore area, pre-first was a private-school creation, adopted by some schools more than 20 years ago to address the needs of youngsters with birthdays late in the year or with developmental clocks running slightly behind their chronological age.More recently, the idea of delaying the start of school for some youngsters has gained currency among public school parents, some of whom postpone the start of kindergarten by a year or send their children to kindergarten for two years.
NEWS
By Karen Avenoso and Karen Avenoso,BOSTON GLOBE | July 21, 1996
FAIRFIELD, Conn. -- In this seaside town in one of the nation's richest counties, Stratfield School parents had plenty to brag about.They had T-shirts heralding their public school's two-time selection as a national Blue Ribbon school by the U.S. Department of Education. They had glossy copies of a 1993 Redbook magazine touting their school as one of the nation's best. And they had their pricey homes driven up in value by their proximity to a prize-winning elementary school.But since May, when Fairfield school officials stated that the answer sheets for Stratfield Elementary School's standardized tests had been tampered with, an entire suburban community has been rocked by intrigue and scandal.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | November 30, 1996
Five years ago, Odessa Adams enrolled her 5-year-old grandson in the Children's Guild, a private school in Northeast Baltimore for emotionally disturbed children. Having lost his mother at age 1, he was a fidgety bundle of turmoil, yet bright beyond his years. Adams hoped the school would provide him with an education as well as emotional stability.Lately, he has getting neither, she said.The problems began last year, when virtually every teacher and therapist she knew quit or was fired after a change in school management.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2012
Shoppers in Maryland showed up at area malls and other retail outlets in large numbers Sunday, the first day of the state's Tax Free Week. The holiday from state sales tax for most clothing and footwear priced under $100 was an incentive to spend and an added bonus this time of year, said parents goingback-to-schoolshopping with their kids. "I say every dollar counts," said Kristin Ganoe of Hagerstown, who was shopping atMacy's at the Mall in Columbia with her husband, Roman, and daughter Gabriella, who's going into the third grade.
NEWS
Erica L. Green | May 23, 2012
In what parents and health organizations called a life-saving measure, Gov. Martin O' Malley signed into a law Tuesday a bill that will require all Maryland schools to maintain an emergency supply of epinephrine in order to respond to a growing trend of severe allergic reactions among school-aged children.  “Receiving a dose of epinephrine in the critical minutes following exposure to a food allergen can mean the difference between life and death,”...
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2012
Katie Anger, a bright-eyed redhead from West Friendship, opened the door for cyber-bullying as a middle-schooler, when she installed the "Honesty Box" app on her Facebook page. Some teens used the now-defunct Facebook feature to criticize her anonymously, tell her that no one liked her and say things they would never have said to her face. "I felt like I almost had no one that would help me through it or be there for me," recalled Katie, 16, now a junior at Maryvale Preparatory School in Brooklandville.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2012
Shirley H. Atkinson, a former public school liaison officer and longtime active member of Sharon Baptist Church, died Feb. 18 of complications from diabetes at St. Agnes Hospital. The lifelong Sandtown-Winchester resident was 77. The daughter of a Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. worker and a homemaker, Shirley Mae Hopkins was born in Baltimore and raised in Sandtown-Winchester. She attended Baltimore public schools and later earned her General Education Development certificate.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2011
Paul Joseph Coyle, a retired board-certified Baltimore County public school psychologist who earlier had been a teacher, died Saturday of lung cancer at Upper Chesapeake Medical Center in Bel Air. The Bel Air resident was 78. The son of a textile mill superintendent and a homemaker, Dr. Coyle was born in Central Falls, R.I., and raised in Lincoln, R.I. After graduating in 1950 from St. Raphael Academy in Pawtucket, R.I., he earned a...
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2011
Barbara Gaskins says she took her 15-year-old son to his bus stop every morning at 7:30, well in time for his 9 a.m. homeroom bell at Patterson High School. She obtained as many medical excuses as the doctor would allow when her son suffered from a series of stomach viruses. And she has taught her children that they have to "get an education to get somewhere in life. " But Gaskins was recently jailed for 10 days — one of the dozen parents of Baltimore City students to receive a sentence this year — after failing to send her child to school 103 of 130 days.
NEWS
March 3, 1991
From: James B. KraftColumbiaIt was very interesting to read Michael Deets' recent letter ("Private school parents deserve a break," Feb. 10) to saddle the Democratic Party and (former County Executive M. Elizabeth Bobo with the opinions of Ken Stevens on behalf of the American Civil Liberties Union.As regards the issue of urging the school board to stop busing parochial school children in Howard County, Mr. Deets should be aware that Ms. Bobo during her 10 years as executive and as a county councilmember never supported such an effort.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2011
For 29 years, the craft fair at Ridgely Middle School in Baltimore County has built a sense of community, earned thousands of dollars for school projects and even taught young entrepreneurs about business. The 2010 fair at the Timonium school drew about 100 crafters and hundreds of shoppers and raised $13,000. But a policy barring third-party vendors, such as crafters, from earning profits at county schools will most likely prevent Ridgely from hosting a 30th fair. "It's a long tradition at Ridgely," said Kay Hardisky, PTA vice president and last year's craft fair chairwoman.
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