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School Overcrowding

NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,Sun Staff Writer | May 31, 1995
Faced with forecasts of overcrowding in as many as 18 elementary schools next year, a Baltimore County councilman said he will introduce a bill to extend a 5-year-old building moratorium in affected neighborhoods.But opponents of the moratorium, which include the building industry, the administration of County Executive C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger III and at least one councilman, said the overcrowding problem isn't caused by home construction."We don't think the problem of overcrowded schools is nearly as serious as it was when [the moratorium]
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NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | October 15, 2001
A last-minute proposal may stave off county condemnation of a 91-year-old western Howard County woman's land for an addition to Glenelg High School. After two years of frustration, a developer might have found a way to build new homes on the land and enable the high school to go forward with a long-awaited 400-seat addition - while saving time and money for everyone. J. Thomas Scrivener has a contract to buy Mae Musgrove's 70-acre parcel for construction of up to 35 homes, according to Musgrove and William Grau, Scrivener's project manager.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff writer | June 23, 1991
With the county budget process complete, County Executive Eileen M. Rehrmann is turning her attention to a legislative package aimed at significantly changing development patterns and its effect on county government's ability to provide services.The legislative initiatives -- called adequate public facilities laws -- are already in place to varying degrees in at least 10 other Maryland counties. The aim ofadequate public facilities initiatives is to hold back approval of some development until the county government is certain it can provideadequate services -- school space, water service, new roads and landfill space -- to meet the demands the new growth would create.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and John Rivera and Liz Atwood and John Rivera,Staff Writers | January 23, 1994
The portable classroom, considered by many a reliable litmus test for school overcrowding, seems to be appearing with troubling frequency on Anne Arundel County school campuses.Many schools are badly overcrowded, say school officials, and they have no problem laying blame: rampant development allowed by a lax Department of Planning and Code Enforcement (PACE)."Growth in the area is just unbelievable," said Carolyn Roeding, president of the County Council of PTAs. "I don't know who is to blame for the poor planning."
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Sun Staff Writer | August 26, 1994
In Pasadena, crowded schools and congested roads demonstrate the issue for 3rd District candidates for the County Council: Is development threatening the small-town feel of the communities along the Mountain Road corridor?"
NEWS
March 5, 2006
Newspaper boosts empty politicians The headlines in the Anne Arundel section [of Feb. 19] were contradictory; "School Crowding Remedy" and "Badger leaves Arundel poised for more growth." Two empty stories about political points of view on ways to say they are doing something but doing nothing. Right now the remedy for the school overcrowding has been hundreds of trailers, and the argument from the Keep Building at Any Cost building community has been to relocate the overflow of students from some place in east county to some place in the west where they are under capacity, or let's get the developers to kick in some money that probably won't be enough.
NEWS
By David Marks and Laurie Taylor-Mitchell | June 5, 2008
Baltimore County has some of the best schools in Maryland. Newsweek recently recognized 10 county high schools as among the top 5 percent in the United States. Unfortunately, there are challenges on the horizon that undermine the strength of our schools and the vitality of our communities. School overcrowding is the most serious of these challenges. The debate over whether to build an addition at Loch Raven High School is the culmination of nearly a decade of frustration with the way Baltimore County plans and builds its schools.
NEWS
By George F. Will | September 22, 1997
NEW YORK -- After 25 years of earnestness in the service of liberalism, it has come to this for Ruth Messinger.She is Manhattan borough president and wants to be the city's mayor. But she barely got the requisite 40 percent of the Democratic primary vote because of Al Sharpton, who might with excessive politeness be termed picaresque. He got 32 percent of the vote in the lowest turnout (18 percent of eligible voters) since the Second World War.So en route to an almost certain shellacking in November by the incumbent, Rudolph E. Giuliani, a nominal Republican, she just got by Mr. Sharpton, the African-American racial racketeer and tax evader (the federal government is inquiring after $100,000)
NEWS
By ELISE ARMACOST | June 18, 1995
Strictly from an education standpoint, the County Council did the right thing last month when it cut money to give Annapolis' troubled Clay Street neighborhood its own school.Kids are spilling out of the classroom in Pasadena, in West County, on the Broadneck peninsula. Just about the only area not suffering from overcrowding is Annapolis. The schools there are operating under capacity.The money that had been earmarked to reopen Adams Park Elementary could be better used in other ways as well.
NEWS
May 31, 2012
Regarding the Solo Cup factory zoning ("No 'courtesy' for Wegmans," May 27), why is no one talking about using the facility for a new middle school in the northwestern part of the county? Franklin Middle School has 1,292 students, Deer Park Middle has 1,235 students and Pikesville Middle has 1,017. These enrollment figures are higher than the other county middle schools and having over 1,200 students in a middle school is ludicrous. The best use of this property would be a new middle school so that student enrollment at the aforementioned middle schools could be reduced to reasonable levels.
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