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September 3, 2013
In response to Duncan S. Keir's letter (Towson Times, Aug. 21, regarding hearing from county officials about school redistricting of the Idlewylde community), let me add this. As a resident of Mays Chapel North, rest-assured that the school board and "our" elected officials will do what ever they please without regard to any community input. I wish Idlewylde better luck than we had. Stephen Petrucci Timonium
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NEWS
By Liz Bowie and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
While Baltimore County officials were deciding whether Michael Williams was fit to continue teaching, he was assigned to a dusty, windowless room at a Pulaski Highway warehouse that held old textbooks, surplus computers and other materials. He, along with a dozen or so employees, sat at a long table reading detective novels and playing Trivial Pursuit. Sometimes they would fall asleep until supervisors, watching from a security camera, came in to wake them up. Williams, who had been accused of touching a girl on the cheek with a yardstick, was paid his full salary plus benefits for more than a year to show up at the warehouse when school was in session.
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NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2012
The 2013-2014 school year may seem like a long way off, but state school officials are already fretting over a perfect storm of education reforms that could make today's extensive state testing regimen seem like a snap. That's the year when students could take as many as five state-mandated tests, on top of their teachers' occasional pop quizzes and the tests given several times each year by the local school systems. While the Maryland School Assessment will be phased out, those tests will still overlap with a new battery of four new assessments to be field tested here and in 23 states.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2014
North Carroll Middle School was flooded with phone calls Tuesday after an erroneous news report that a student had shot and killed herself inside the Hampstead school. A 13-year-old girl at North Carroll Middle had committed suicide off school grounds, and school officials said teachers and counselors were talking to students about the loss of a fellow student during morning classes. Dana Falls, director of student services for Carroll County Public Schools, said that shortly after noon, the school received a flood of calls from parents worried about the reports of violence.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2014
County schools will launch the new academic year Aug. 25, but parents seeking to enroll their children in the district's new contract school should also pay attention to another date: June 18. That's the day school officials say it needs all funding in place for Monarch Global Academy Public Contract School, which is scheduled to open in August in the Laurel area. The $5.8 million that officials say they need for Monarch Global was not specifically earmarked in County Executive Laura Neuman's budget proposal to the County Council.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2010
Baltimore's school-based health centers will continue to be funded by the city after the budget was passed last month restoring the imperiled program, a move that parents lauded even as the school system works to find money to pay for other student resources that were cut. All of the city's 13 health centers will remain open next school year, thanks in part to additional revenue that will come via new taxes. But school officials have not determined where they will find $6.2 million the city budget did not restore for half the city's crossing guards and free bus passes for students.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN STAFF | August 1, 1999
A Baltimore County judge has decided there is enough reason to let a defamation suit against top Carroll County school officials move forward.The lawsuit, filed in April by James W. Ancel -- a Towson contractor who was hired to build Cranberry Station Elementary School in Westminster -- alleges Superintendent William H. Hyde, Assistant Superintendent Vernon F. Smith Jr. and school board attorney Louis J. Kozlakowski harmed his reputation by saying that...
NEWS
March 8, 1996
Anne Arundel County school officials have added a briefing on four redistricting proposals to relieve crowding at George Fox Middle School and changed the date of a hearing.The second briefing -- one was to be held last night -- will be at 7 p.m. Thursday at Chesapeake Bay Middle School.The hearing, originally scheduled for March 27, will be at 7 p.m. March 28, also at Chesapeake Bay Middle School. The change was made to avoid conflict with school activities.George Fox is in the Northeast High School feeder system.
NEWS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe and Deidre Nerreau McCabe,Staff Writer | July 23, 1992
Parents at Brock Bridge Elementary organized a town meeting Tuesday to ask school system officials about an ongoing investigation involving child abuse and allegations that their new principal failed to report the suspected abuse.Problem was, the school officials didn't come.Robin Stapleton, who has twin boys at Brock Bridge, told about 80 parents attending the meeting in Maryland City that she had called a dozen school officials and Board of Education members asking them to attend the meeting.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 27, 1999
Howard County school officials are recommending a raise for substitute teachers, as well as the expansion of an incentive program for retired teachers.At a school board meeting last night, Kirk A. Thompson, a human resources specialist with the school system, proposed a $10-a-day increase for substitutes.That means a substitute teacher with a college degree would receive $75 a day, up from the current $65. A substitute without a degree would receive $65, and those with less than 60 hours of college credit would continue to be paid $55 daily.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2014
A female student at Towson University died Saturday night at an off-campus residence, a university spokeswoman said. The university did not immediately identify the student or the circumstances of her death. University spokeswoman Gay Pinder said the cause of death was not violence, but she declined to elaborate. Towson officials have been in touch with the family, who live out-of-state, Pinder said. She did not say where the student was from. Baltimore County Police and Fire departments said they had not fielded any calls related to the incident and were not handling the investigation.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
When Howard Community College nursing student Danielle LaClair discovered that her tuition payment plan had been canceled, she didn't know what to think. As it turned out, the 28-year-old Ellicott City resident had no cause for worry. LaClair was among more than 1,300 students at the community college to receive a county government-funded scholarship designed to make college affordable for county residents in need. Howard Community College officials said the $2.5 million funding for the Pathway Scholarship Program is the largest one-time gift in school history, eclipsing the previous mark of $1.5 million from the Rouse Company Foundation in 2007.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
About a dozen schoolchildren at the Willows Apartments in Glen Burnie queued up curbside as the Anne Arundel County school bus pulled up. Some kids were flanked by parents and toddler siblings who appeared just as excited to see the bus; the moment had all the trappings of the first day of school. But that's a few weeks away. Instead, the bus had come with a mainstay for students in the area: healthy meals. School officials opened the rear of the bus and set up tables with some of the same food offered during the school year, feeding not only the schoolchildren but siblings who won't begin classes for a couple of years.
NEWS
BiJoe Burris | July 18, 2014
The Howard County Public Schools System report increases in students taking Advanced Placement courses and taking AP exams last year, with 81 percent posting test scores of at least 81.4, school officials said. HCPSS said it aims to increase the number os student taking at least one AP course during high school, citing national research showing high school students that take AP courses in high school are more likley to perform well in college. HCPSS officals said the  number of HCPSS students taking at least one AP exam increased from 4,282 this past year, up from 4,255 last year, school officials said.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2014
Baltimore County Public Schools officials on Tuesday pledged to improve communications with Rodgers Forge residents regarding updates and revisions of a controversial proposal to renovate Dumbarton Middle School - a project that involves removal of several historic trees on the property. The $27.5 million plan calls for additions and renovations to make the 58-year-old school compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act, bring the interior up to 21st-century standards and improve traffic flow and safety.
NEWS
BiJoe Burris | July 7, 2014
School is out, but it's business as usual for the Anne Arundel County school system, which has undergone several transactions during the summer break. Among the transactions: Ayesha Chaudhry, a rising senior at South River High School, was sworn in as the board's 41 st student member on July 1 at the county courthouse in Annapolis, school officials said. Chaudhry succeeds Else Drooff, a Broadneck High School graduate whose term ended on June 30. School officals said that board member Kevin Jackson, whose five-year term in an at-large seat also officially expired on June 30, will remain in his seat until a new governor is sworn into office and makes an appointment early next year.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | February 3, 2004
With more wintry weather in the forecast this week, Carroll County school officials are soliciting ideas for making up lost days. With February just starting, the county already has one day to make up because it has used more than the four emergency closing days that were built into the 2003-2004 school calendar, said Superintendent Charles I. Ecker. "There's more snow coming," said Ecker. "We want to get the word out about the various options we have for the makeup days." Ecker is considering the Presidents Day holiday, Feb. 16, as a possible makeup day. He will submit a recommendation on making up lost school days when the county school board meets Feb. 11. The county school system must obtain a waiver from the State Department of Education to eliminate an official public school holiday.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff Writer | October 2, 1992
A new building for New Windsor Middle School and a new roof for East Middle School were at the top of the priority list yesterday when Carroll school officials presented their capital budget projects.Lester P. Surber, supervisor of school facilities and planning, asked the county planning commission to recommend that the county pay $5.1 million toward the new school and $25,400 toward the new roof in fiscal year 1994, which begins next July 1.The total cost for building the new middle school is $7,983,800.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2014
Looking at the Magothy River backdrop abutting Eagle Cove School in Pasadena, it isn't hard to imagine that teachers at the private prekindergarten-through-fifth grade school must have a difficult time teaching the meaning of the word "final. " Everything from the running water and the changes of seasons to the budding plants and growing animal life speaks of a continuum - a contrast to the fact that this past year marked the final days of the school's history. Eagle Cove School, which was founded along the Magothy near Gibson Island in 1956, is closing, a casualty of declining enrollment and dwindling funds.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2014
Baltimore police plan to deploy officers around city schools until the school year ends to ensure student safety amid recent racial tensions, while school officials joined civil rights leaders to urge students of different races to peacefully resolve differences. The actions followed recent threats and violent attacks on Latino students as well as the Memorial Day robbery and murder of a 15-year-old Mexican student who had dropped out of high school to help his family. Black and Hispanic leaders called for peace at a news conference Monday afternoon, before police deployed several officers to Federal Hill near Digital Harbor High School to deter groups of students from fighting in the streets.
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