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By Kathy Curtis and Kathy Curtis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 11, 1998
WEST COLUMBIA residents Sarah Thompson and Mark Dubac will be soloists during the spring concert of the Columbia Orchestra on March 21.The musicians were finalists in the orchestra's 1997-1998 Young Artist Competition.Sarah, a cellist, will perform Boccherini's Concerto in B Flat Major, G. 482.Mark, a clarinetist, will be featured in Weber's Concertino for Clarinet, Op. 26.An eighth-grader at Harper's Choice Middle School, Sarah has studied with Evelyn Elsing for the past year through the Levine School of Music in Washington.
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FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | November 5, 1995
Paul Maillet always knew what he wanted to be, where he wanted to go. He would be a concert pianist, a great one.From the time he was 5 years old, his life was utterly invested in music. He spent hours every day at his piano, composing, playing, practicing. His gift was evident to everyone who knew him, and who knew music.For more than 30 years, the Peabody Conservatory graduate moved determinedly toward his goal, performing on stages across five continents and winning one prestigious piano competition after another.
NEWS
By Sarah Hoover and Sarah Hoover,Special to the Sun | March 7, 2008
When internationally acclaimed pianist Eun Joo Chung steps onstage at 3 p.m. Sunday at Christ Episcopal Church in Columbia to perform a program of devilishly difficult music, she might not strike you as the girl next door. But she is; Chung has been a resident of Howard County for six years. "It's different here than in Vienna," she says, where she had studied in Austria at the Hochschule f?r Musik and performed at the Musikverein. "There everyone was a musician. Music was so much a part of everyday life."
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Staff Writer | May 12, 1995
Robert Sirota, chairman of the music department at New York University, is to become director of the Peabody Institute, Baltimore's nationally renowned music conservatory.A composer, conductor and educator, Dr. Sirota promised yesterday to honor the 137-year-old school's traditions while embracing the changes in society and technology that will arrive with the 21st century."I don't think people need to fear that change will somehow diminish the great things that already exist," Dr. Sirota said.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | October 23, 1992
Aaron Jay Kernis devours everything he hears. As it does for many young composers, this means reflecting the influences of Gustav Mahler and John Adams, Steve Reich and Richard Wagner, Olivier Messiaen and Richard Strauss and Jean Sibelius and Jerry Lee Lewis.But Kernis, whose music will be performed tonight at Meyerhoff Hall by Baltimore Symphony music director David Zinman and members of the BSO, takes eclecticism further than most. He walks down a street in his multi-ethnic Washington Heights neighborhood in New York, hears salsa and rap blasting from car radios and finds a way to fit it into his music.
NEWS
December 12, 2004
Frederick Fennell, 90, a classical music conductor and teacher acclaimed for creating an innovative wind ensemble at the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, N.Y., died Tuesday at his home in Siesta Key, Fla. While bedridden with hepatitis for six weeks in 1952, Mr. Fennell dreamed up the notion of redefining the typical wind-and-brass band by whittling down its numbers and emphasizing its musical dexterity and virtuosity. His Eastman Wind Ensemble, signed by Mercury Records in the 1950s, went on to record 22 albums.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | May 19, 1991
Bernard Booker, 16 years old, is going through change of life. The throwing of rocks at cars is behind him. So is the running from cops, which was considered sporting activity in his old crowd. On weekends, when he sees his buddies from the neighborhood, they talk across a communications gap."They consider me a white boy," Booker says, "or a nerd.""A nerd, of course," laughs Sharonda Alston, sitting next to him. The two of them nod knowingly at each other. Sharonda is 16 and says she's heard accusations of nerdiness all of her young life.
NEWS
January 29, 2003
Alison Matuskey, vocal music teacher at Bryant Woods Elementary School, is running as fast as she can. Named Music Educator of the Year for 2002-2003 by Howard County Parents for School Music, she has generated a cascade of musical activities. Matuskey, who is trained as a concert pianist and sings opera, organized a song-writing project with songwriter Sue Trainor for children in grades one through five. Her students sang their compositions in the school's winter concert Jan. 15 to help raise money for Spenser's Hope, a nonprofit founded by Gretchen Miller, a parent at Bryant Woods, to help families experiencing pre-term labor or premature birth.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 17, 2004
Anti-Semitism, never far from the surface of human relations, seems to be on the rise once more in many parts of the world. Add in the kind of unfortunate thinking expressed recently by Mel Gibson - "The Second World War killed tens of millions of people; some of them were Jews in concentration camps" - and there is abundant need for Holocaust Remembrance Day, officially observed tomorrow in this country. Two remarkable music programs in Baltimore and Washington will help intensify that remembrance this weekend; another pair of programs in Washington will continue the process next month.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Sun | June 29, 2008
The nine youngsters flapped, twirled, and sang songs about bugs and their creepy personalities. In a song about butterflies, one child donned antennae ears to portray a stinky bug, while the other eight children wore floor-length, sheer scarves to portray butterflies. When the music started, they did their best imitations of butterflies fluttering through the air. "I chose the bugs theme because I knew it was something that the kids would really get into," said Joyful Sounds School of Music co-owner Sandy Pietrowicz, who is also piano and voice director.
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