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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 5, 2001
Services were held yesterday for Reginald E. Clem, whose tenor voice graced many productions of the Baltimore Choral Arts Society and the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra Chorus. Mr. Clem, a longtime Towson resident, took his own life Wednesday. He was 49. In recent years, family members said, he had been treated for depression. For almost 30 years, Mr. Clem was a familiar figure on the Baltimore music scene. He also sang with the Lovely Lane United Methodist Church Choir and the Handel Choir.
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FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Staff Writer | March 22, 1992
Cellist Troy Kenneth Stuart loves the instrument's soundHow would you like to play Carnegie Hall, meet Yo-Yo Ma and win a music scholarship -- all before turning 25?How, in other words, would you like to be Troy Kenneth Stuart?The cellist from West Baltimore likes it just fine, thank you very much.In fact, he says, "I love what I do so much sometimes I feel selfish."Today at 5 p.m. he'll share his passion for classical music during a free concert at the Eubie Blake Cultural Center.A self-described late bloomer, he grew up listening to everything from pop to gospel but didn't take up the cello until he was 13. "I loved the size of it and the sound of it. It fit my personality," says the outgoing 24-year-old.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | December 2, 2004
During the holiday season, Christmas music is everywhere, but it seems as if a good Hanukkah song is hard to find. That's how pianist Jon Simon felt about 16 years ago. "After hearing all these fun, interesting ways of taking familiar [Christmas] songs and re- interpreting them ... I went home and started noodling around the keyboard," he said. He decided that Jewish music -- including Hanukkah songs, music from other holidays and folk music -- could be revamped and revitalized, as well.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 9, 2001
Keith S. Kummer, former principal English horn player with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and longtime union activist and supporter of musicians' rights, died Thursday at Carroll County General Hospital. The Finksburg resident was 72. Mr. Kummer, who had been a member of the BSO for 37 years until retiring in 1999, also was an accomplished oboist. Mr. Kummer, whose English horn playing a critic described as "exquisitely beautiful," joined the BSO in 1962. Before that, he played with the Rochester and Buffalo philharmonic orchestras and was a member for six years of the faculty of the Indiana University School of Music.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | April 8, 1995
Seth Knopp abandoned a budding career as a solo pianist to become a chamber music player because he fell in love with a woman. He decided to organize today's free Chamber Music Marathon in Friedberg Hall at the Peabody Conservatory of Music because he's in love with chamber music."
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt | June 4, 1991
WHERE will the next generation of performing artists like Jascha Heifitz, Leontyne Price and Andres Segovia come from? If the talent on display at last week's Baltimore School for the Arts' senior recital is any guide, a lot of them may hail from right here.In a city in which the quality of the public schools in general is a persistent cause for worry, the achievements of the Baltimore School for the Arts, a public school, are little short of astonishing.The school sends 90 percent of its graduates to college or directly into professional performing careers.
NEWS
By Charlotte Sommers and Charlotte Sommers,Special to The Sun | October 23, 1994
Clay Purdy is Harford County's Renaissance man -- concert violinist, inventor, electronics buff, music teacher, stay-at-home dad and Army veteran.Mr. Purdy's violin virtuosity will be showcased Saturday when he performs as guest soloist with the Susquehanna Symphony Orchestra.His other talents are less public, but just as impressive.While Mr. Purdy's wife, Nancy, a sales representative for a pharmaceutical firm, goes off to work each day, he stays in their Abingdon home and cares for their 16-month-old son, Christopher.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | September 25, 2009
The classes in "Fame" include acting, singing and dancing. What the movie really needed is a class in screenwriting. This film has premises - the schoolrooms, stages and cafeteria of the Professional Performing Arts School in Hell's Kitchen, New York - but no premise. It simply plops a handful of aspiring entertainers and artists and a few teachers in front of the camera and samples their lives and work from audition day to graduation. And I do mean "samples": It's as if every bit of potential talent or conflict has been put through a digital synthesizer.
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 10, 2001
COMPOSER Ed Pond of Westminster will present a selection of five original ensemble pieces in Kaleidoscope 2001, a public concert Oct. 21 that will feature local classical musicians. Pond, 47, is a Westminster native who graduated from Berkeley School of Music in Boston and earned his doctorate after studying in Paris. He is pastoral associate of liturgy and music at St. Joseph's Roman Catholic Church in Eldersburg. His style involves fusing classical with jazz. He has written solo, ensemble and symphonic pieces.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing writer | August 16, 1991
The joys of concerts al fresco are well known to classical music lovers nationwide.Many of the great American orchestras retire to summer musical festivals and proceed to mix art with nature, to the delight of many listeners who prefer lawn chairs and shirt sleeves to the formality of a concert hall.Thanks to Joseph McCann, county recreation and parks director, County Executive Robert R. Neall, and County Council members Maureen Lamb and "Dutch" Holland, music-lovers will have the opportunity to getin on the musical summer fun.At Downs Park in Pasadena on Sunday, Sept.
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