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NEWS
September 27, 1994
Gloria Sturgis StokesMusician, teacherGloria Sturgis Stokes, a retired teacher and music department head in the Baltimore public school system, died Friday at Bon Secours Hospital of complications from diabetes. She was 71.Mrs. Stokes, who played piano, violin and other instruments, started as a music education teacher in 1949 and retired in 1982 as head of the music department at the old Clifton Park Junior High School, where she had taught for about 10 years.The former Gloria Sturgis was born in West Point, Va., and reared in Baltimore, where she graduated from Dunbar High School.
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FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | October 24, 1991
CLASSICAL music fans weary of the works of long-dead composers will have little reason to complain when the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra invites nine living American composers here and plays their music over a 12-day period.The American Composers' Showcase, which will include public talks, is divided into three segments: The Discovery Series, featuring computer music; a Celebrity Series premiere by Christopher Rouse; and the Live, Gifted and Black series, featuring the works of black composers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | January 8, 2004
Her sound was inviting, passion-soaked, beautifully soulful. But where did it fit exactly? It was 1978 and disco was king, ruling the R&B charts, where Angela Bofill, an ebony-eyed, full-lipped Latina from the West Bronx, found an immediate home. Alongside beat-driven albums by Instant Funk, Donna Summer, Chic and Sister Sledge, Bofill's debut, Angie, stood out on the listings for its eclecticism: a classy, intelligent mix of African chants, smooth jazz and uptown soul. Angel of the Night, her sophomore effort, appeared nine months after Angie and was a bigger smash, featuring the Quiet Storm, self-penned classic "I Try."
NEWS
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | December 29, 1992
Stephen Albert, 51, the Pulitzer Prize-winning composer who was one of the founders of what has been called the "New Romanticism," was killed Sunday afternoon in a three-car collision on Cape Cod, Mass.The accident left eight other people injured, including the composer's wife, Marilyn, 49, and their children, Joshua, 23, and Katie, 21. Mr. Albert's daughter was released from Cape Cod hospital with minor injuries. His wife and son are listed in stable condition at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 5, 2001
Services were held yesterday for Reginald E. Clem, whose tenor voice graced many productions of the Baltimore Choral Arts Society and the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra Chorus. Mr. Clem, a longtime Towson resident, took his own life Wednesday. He was 49. In recent years, family members said, he had been treated for depression. For almost 30 years, Mr. Clem was a familiar figure on the Baltimore music scene. He also sang with the Lovely Lane United Methodist Church Choir and the Handel Choir.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | December 3, 1990
Twentieth century music is filled with works for narrator. Why this should be the case is not exactly a mystery. Ours has been a century of ironic detachment -- how else to distance ourselves from some of its horrors? -- and few things create irony like the contrast between spoken words and music.Saturday night in Friedberg Hall at the Peabody Conservatory in the Baltimore Symphony "Discovery Series," conductor David Zinman, members of the orchestra and two narrators performed two of these works: Sir William Walton's "Facade" and Igor Stravinsky's "The Soldier's Tale."
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | August 15, 2002
Some studies have suggested that music exposure might improve intellectual development. And just in case they're right, 18-month-old Mason Buswell has been getting the saturation treatment since before he was born. His dad used to put headphones on his mom's belly when Mason was in utero - playing everything from New Age jazz to Led Zeppelin - and now the toddler is enrolled in a weekly music class in Clarksville. Scott Buswell, Mason's father, says that while he doesn't know if it's having any effect, it sure is fun. "He's been dancing since he was able to stand," Buswell said, "and he loves these classes."
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt | June 4, 1991
WHERE will the next generation of performing artists like Jascha Heifitz, Leontyne Price and Andres Segovia come from? If the talent on display at last week's Baltimore School for the Arts' senior recital is any guide, a lot of them may hail from right here.In a city in which the quality of the public schools in general is a persistent cause for worry, the achievements of the Baltimore School for the Arts, a public school, are little short of astonishing.The school sends 90 percent of its graduates to college or directly into professional performing careers.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 9, 2001
Keith S. Kummer, former principal English horn player with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and longtime union activist and supporter of musicians' rights, died Thursday at Carroll County General Hospital. The Finksburg resident was 72. Mr. Kummer, who had been a member of the BSO for 37 years until retiring in 1999, also was an accomplished oboist. Mr. Kummer, whose English horn playing a critic described as "exquisitely beautiful," joined the BSO in 1962. Before that, he played with the Rochester and Buffalo philharmonic orchestras and was a member for six years of the faculty of the Indiana University School of Music.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | December 2, 2004
During the holiday season, Christmas music is everywhere, but it seems as if a good Hanukkah song is hard to find. That's how pianist Jon Simon felt about 16 years ago. "After hearing all these fun, interesting ways of taking familiar [Christmas] songs and re- interpreting them ... I went home and started noodling around the keyboard," he said. He decided that Jewish music -- including Hanukkah songs, music from other holidays and folk music -- could be revamped and revitalized, as well.
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