Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSchool Of Music
IN THE NEWS

School Of Music

NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 5, 2001
Services were held yesterday for Reginald E. Clem, whose tenor voice graced many productions of the Baltimore Choral Arts Society and the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra Chorus. Mr. Clem, a longtime Towson resident, took his own life Wednesday. He was 49. In recent years, family members said, he had been treated for depression. For almost 30 years, Mr. Clem was a familiar figure on the Baltimore music scene. He also sang with the Lovely Lane United Methodist Church Choir and the Handel Choir.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | December 3, 1990
Twentieth century music is filled with works for narrator. Why this should be the case is not exactly a mystery. Ours has been a century of ironic detachment -- how else to distance ourselves from some of its horrors? -- and few things create irony like the contrast between spoken words and music.Saturday night in Friedberg Hall at the Peabody Conservatory in the Baltimore Symphony "Discovery Series," conductor David Zinman, members of the orchestra and two narrators performed two of these works: Sir William Walton's "Facade" and Igor Stravinsky's "The Soldier's Tale."
NEWS
By Stephanie Choy and Stephanie Choy,SUN STAFF | January 30, 2003
The Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Columbia will present the second concert of its 2002-2003 chamber music series, "Wolfie and the Gang," performed by the Kegelstatt Trio, on Feb. 8. The trio consists of pianist Elizabeth Azcona-Hartmark, clarinetist Tom Benjamin and violinist Rebecca Henry. Guest cellist is Dan Levitov. The four are colleagues at Peabody Institute in Baltimore. Azcona-Hartmark began playing piano at age 4. She received degrees from Eastman School of Music, Royal Schools of Music and Trinity College of Music in London.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Staff Writer | March 22, 1992
Cellist Troy Kenneth Stuart loves the instrument's soundHow would you like to play Carnegie Hall, meet Yo-Yo Ma and win a music scholarship -- all before turning 25?How, in other words, would you like to be Troy Kenneth Stuart?The cellist from West Baltimore likes it just fine, thank you very much.In fact, he says, "I love what I do so much sometimes I feel selfish."Today at 5 p.m. he'll share his passion for classical music during a free concert at the Eubie Blake Cultural Center.A self-described late bloomer, he grew up listening to everything from pop to gospel but didn't take up the cello until he was 13. "I loved the size of it and the sound of it. It fit my personality," says the outgoing 24-year-old.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt | June 4, 1991
WHERE will the next generation of performing artists like Jascha Heifitz, Leontyne Price and Andres Segovia come from? If the talent on display at last week's Baltimore School for the Arts' senior recital is any guide, a lot of them may hail from right here.In a city in which the quality of the public schools in general is a persistent cause for worry, the achievements of the Baltimore School for the Arts, a public school, are little short of astonishing.The school sends 90 percent of its graduates to college or directly into professional performing careers.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | December 2, 2004
During the holiday season, Christmas music is everywhere, but it seems as if a good Hanukkah song is hard to find. That's how pianist Jon Simon felt about 16 years ago. "After hearing all these fun, interesting ways of taking familiar [Christmas] songs and re- interpreting them ... I went home and started noodling around the keyboard," he said. He decided that Jewish music -- including Hanukkah songs, music from other holidays and folk music -- could be revamped and revitalized, as well.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 9, 2001
Keith S. Kummer, former principal English horn player with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and longtime union activist and supporter of musicians' rights, died Thursday at Carroll County General Hospital. The Finksburg resident was 72. Mr. Kummer, who had been a member of the BSO for 37 years until retiring in 1999, also was an accomplished oboist. Mr. Kummer, whose English horn playing a critic described as "exquisitely beautiful," joined the BSO in 1962. Before that, he played with the Rochester and Buffalo philharmonic orchestras and was a member for six years of the faculty of the Indiana University School of Music.
NEWS
By Charlotte Sommers and Charlotte Sommers,Special to The Sun | October 23, 1994
Clay Purdy is Harford County's Renaissance man -- concert violinist, inventor, electronics buff, music teacher, stay-at-home dad and Army veteran.Mr. Purdy's violin virtuosity will be showcased Saturday when he performs as guest soloist with the Susquehanna Symphony Orchestra.His other talents are less public, but just as impressive.While Mr. Purdy's wife, Nancy, a sales representative for a pharmaceutical firm, goes off to work each day, he stays in their Abingdon home and cares for their 16-month-old son, Christopher.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | April 8, 1995
Seth Knopp abandoned a budding career as a solo pianist to become a chamber music player because he fell in love with a woman. He decided to organize today's free Chamber Music Marathon in Friedberg Hall at the Peabody Conservatory of Music because he's in love with chamber music."
FEATURES
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,LAN NGUYEN is a reporter for the Howard County Sun | May 31, 1992
We went in search of the future in the corridors of high schools and found six stories of resolve and commitment, of pride and emerging self-esteem, of triumph over adversity. Slightly battered by unruly economic times and the cyclonic whirl of turbulent society, these six men and women have nonetheless remained buoyant and steadfast. In search of keepsakes from the Class of 1992, we found six seemingly unconnected lives that seen as one create a patchwork quilt of persistence.Richard WhiteAge: 18Residence: BaltimoreGraduating from: Baltimore School for the ArtsFuture: major in music at New England Conservatory of Music, Manhattan School of Music or Peabody ConservatoryTo some people's eyes, the tuba is big, bulky and ugly.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.