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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | June 2, 2007
Marilyn Neeley Gerle, a pianist who had been chairwoman of the piano division at Catholic University of America's school of music for more than three decades, died Wednesday of pneumonia at Holy Cross Hospital in Silver Spring. The former Catonsville and Washington resident who lived in Hyattsville was 69. Marilyn Neeley, who played professionally under her maiden name, was born and raised in Los Angeles. "Her mother was a piano teacher, and she'd sit under the piano listening while she gave lessons," said her son and only survivor, Andrew Gerle, a musical theater composer who lives in New York City.
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By Katie Baker | August 20, 2013
It was Parade Day in Ellicott City when a lost Olenka Stasyshyn Bren first meandered down Main Street. She immediately fell in love with the row of quaint shops and interesting passersby. Trained as a concert pianist in Ukraine, Bren came to the United States at age 26 not speaking a word of English. After teaching in a private school for three years in South Dakota (“I was a mute piano teacher!”), Bren headed to the East Coast to meet up with her family in Maryland. It was during that trip she discovered what remained of the music school on Historic Main Street, Ellicott City.
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FEATURES
June 21, 1998
John Barth (1930-) is a native Marylander, who has been successful in his dual careers as novelist and professor. A former professional drummer, he was educated at the Juilliard School of Music and later attended Johns Hopkins School of music in Baltimore. Many of his novels, including "Lost the Funhouse," a volume of stories 'for Print, Tape and Live Voice'; The Sot-Weed Factor and "Letters" are considered unconventional. Barth is considered one of America's bestselling novelists. Some Barth is best seen as a counter-realist, constructing worlds outside the everyday.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | September 25, 2009
The classes in "Fame" include acting, singing and dancing. What the movie really needed is a class in screenwriting. This film has premises - the schoolrooms, stages and cafeteria of the Professional Performing Arts School in Hell's Kitchen, New York - but no premise. It simply plops a handful of aspiring entertainers and artists and a few teachers in front of the camera and samples their lives and work from audition day to graduation. And I do mean "samples": It's as if every bit of potential talent or conflict has been put through a digital synthesizer.
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | November 5, 1995
Paul Maillet always knew what he wanted to be, where he wanted to go. He would be a concert pianist, a great one.From the time he was 5 years old, his life was utterly invested in music. He spent hours every day at his piano, composing, playing, practicing. His gift was evident to everyone who knew him, and who knew music.For more than 30 years, the Peabody Conservatory graduate moved determinedly toward his goal, performing on stages across five continents and winning one prestigious piano competition after another.
NEWS
February 2, 2003
Hazel Penniman Luther, 113, the oldest woman in Florida, died Friday at Halifax Medical Center in Daytona Beach, where she was taken after developing a cold and high temperature. Born Dec. 11, 1889, Mrs. Luther was the world's ninth-oldest living person, according to the Gerontology Research Group. At her 113th birthday party, she was asked if she wanted to live forever. "I think I already have," she replied. Mrs. Luther attended Juilliard School of Music, then known as the Institute of Musical Art, and earned two diplomas in singing.
NEWS
April 22, 2001
Edith W. Stieber, 92, Towson Library founder Edith W. Stieber, a founder of the Towson Library, artist and longtime community volunteer, died Tuesday of emphysema at Stella Maris in Towson. She was 92. Born Edith Wilson in Lansdowne, Pa., she grew up in Towson and graduated from the Maryland Institute. College of Art in the early 1930s. In 1935, she married Frederick W. Stieber, a well-known Baltimore athlete and owner of Stieber's Store, a gourmet grocery in Towson. He died in 1992.
NEWS
May 26, 2000
Gideon W. Waldrop, 80, a composer and administrator who served for 24 years as dean of the Juilliard School of Music, died May 12 in New York. During the 1950s, he was the editor of the Review of Recorded Music and the Musical Courier. He also served as a music consultant to the Ford Foundation. He became the assistant to the president at Juilliard in 1960 and was appointed dean the next year. In 1969, the school moved from its old building in the Morningside Heights section of Manhattan to its new $30 million building at Lincoln Center.
NEWS
July 15, 2003
Leslie Dragan, a 2003 Liberty High School graduate, has been awarded the Stewart W. Myers Memorial Scholarship from Stu's Music in Westminster. She participated in the Maryland All-State Orchestra all four years of high school. She was principal viola in her junior and senior years and All-Eastern principal violist. In her junior year, she joined the Greater Baltimore Youth Orchestra and won the concerto competition. As a senior, she joined the Peabody Preparatory Orchestra. Dragan is attending an intensive music program at Boston University's Tanglewood Institute.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jennifer Choi | July 24, 2008
Metaphor The lowdown: The jazz quartet Metaphor released its debut album, Temporary Suspension, which features a mixture of contemporary jazz and chamber music, as well as African, Afro-Cuban, rock and hip-hop, this month. The group gives two performances tomorrow at An die Musik. If you go: The concerts are at 8 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. An die Musik is at 409 N. Charles St. $5-$10. Call 410-385-2638 or go to andie musiklive.com. Art exhibit The lowdown: The Caryn Martin: Atmospheric Abstractions exhibit runs at the Creative Alliance Wednesday through Aug. 16. Martin's works consist of several quasi-monochrome and almost abstract landscapes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jennifer Choi | July 24, 2008
Metaphor The lowdown: The jazz quartet Metaphor released its debut album, Temporary Suspension, which features a mixture of contemporary jazz and chamber music, as well as African, Afro-Cuban, rock and hip-hop, this month. The group gives two performances tomorrow at An die Musik. If you go: The concerts are at 8 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. An die Musik is at 409 N. Charles St. $5-$10. Call 410-385-2638 or go to andie musiklive.com. Art exhibit The lowdown: The Caryn Martin: Atmospheric Abstractions exhibit runs at the Creative Alliance Wednesday through Aug. 16. Martin's works consist of several quasi-monochrome and almost abstract landscapes.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Sun | June 29, 2008
The nine youngsters flapped, twirled, and sang songs about bugs and their creepy personalities. In a song about butterflies, one child donned antennae ears to portray a stinky bug, while the other eight children wore floor-length, sheer scarves to portray butterflies. When the music started, they did their best imitations of butterflies fluttering through the air. "I chose the bugs theme because I knew it was something that the kids would really get into," said Joyful Sounds School of Music co-owner Sandy Pietrowicz, who is also piano and voice director.
NEWS
By Sarah Hoover and Sarah Hoover,Special to the Sun | March 7, 2008
When internationally acclaimed pianist Eun Joo Chung steps onstage at 3 p.m. Sunday at Christ Episcopal Church in Columbia to perform a program of devilishly difficult music, she might not strike you as the girl next door. But she is; Chung has been a resident of Howard County for six years. "It's different here than in Vienna," she says, where she had studied in Austria at the Hochschule f?r Musik and performed at the Musikverein. "There everyone was a musician. Music was so much a part of everyday life."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | June 2, 2007
Marilyn Neeley Gerle, a pianist who had been chairwoman of the piano division at Catholic University of America's school of music for more than three decades, died Wednesday of pneumonia at Holy Cross Hospital in Silver Spring. The former Catonsville and Washington resident who lived in Hyattsville was 69. Marilyn Neeley, who played professionally under her maiden name, was born and raised in Los Angeles. "Her mother was a piano teacher, and she'd sit under the piano listening while she gave lessons," said her son and only survivor, Andrew Gerle, a musical theater composer who lives in New York City.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,Sun reporter | May 6, 2007
Fresh-faced composer Jacob Bancks is one of four finalists in the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra's competition to write a piece reflecting the spirit of the city. A fine challenge, he thought. Except the Midwesterner had never seen Annapolis. That changed last week, when Bancks, 25, flew into town in search of inspiration. He just may have found it by the water. "The voyages across the water people have taken from all over the world," he said pensively, "to see this beautiful city at the end of the voyage."
NEWS
By Sarah Hoover and Sarah Hoover,special to the sun | February 16, 2007
Is classical music a dead art form? Not when musicians are as talented, adventurous and passionate as the five members of woodwind ensemble Imani Winds. Extending the boundaries of sound, style and repertoire in new directions, Imani Winds comes to Howard Community College's Smith Theatre at 8 p.m. tomorrow, sharing bright hope for the future of classical music. Founded in 1997, the five-member ensemble takes its name from the Swahili word for faith -- and faith is something that Valerie Coleman, flutist and composer, has in abundance.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Staff Writer | March 22, 1992
Cellist Troy Kenneth Stuart loves the instrument's soundHow would you like to play Carnegie Hall, meet Yo-Yo Ma and win a music scholarship -- all before turning 25?How, in other words, would you like to be Troy Kenneth Stuart?The cellist from West Baltimore likes it just fine, thank you very much.In fact, he says, "I love what I do so much sometimes I feel selfish."Today at 5 p.m. he'll share his passion for classical music during a free concert at the Eubie Blake Cultural Center.A self-described late bloomer, he grew up listening to everything from pop to gospel but didn't take up the cello until he was 13. "I loved the size of it and the sound of it. It fit my personality," says the outgoing 24-year-old.
FEATURES
By Henry Scarupa | June 17, 1991
Keyontia R. Hawkins, a 17-year-old soprano just graduated from the Baltimore School for the Arts, takes a step forward in a promising career with a performance at 8:30 tonight at the Kennedy Center Concert Hall in Washington.Recently named a Presidential Scholar, the nation's highest honor bestowed on graduating seniors, the Overlea resident has been invited to take part in Presidential Scholars National Recognition Week (June 15-20) in the nation's capital and will be honored by President Bush and members of the administration and Congress.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Special to The Sun | November 22, 2006
With its swirling instrumental colors and irresistible surges of melody spinning out musical "Tales of the Arabian Nights," Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov's Scheherazade is one of the most exotic, best-loved orchestral showpieces of them all. True to the work's pictorial elements, the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra's performance of Rimsky-Korsakov's exotic masterwork Saturday evening provided an interesting portrait of where the ASO stands in Year Two of conductor...
NEWS
December 12, 2004
Frederick Fennell, 90, a classical music conductor and teacher acclaimed for creating an innovative wind ensemble at the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, N.Y., died Tuesday at his home in Siesta Key, Fla. While bedridden with hepatitis for six weeks in 1952, Mr. Fennell dreamed up the notion of redefining the typical wind-and-brass band by whittling down its numbers and emphasizing its musical dexterity and virtuosity. His Eastman Wind Ensemble, signed by Mercury Records in the 1950s, went on to record 22 albums.
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