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By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2004
Fetuses and newborns exposed to some common anti-inflammatory drugs may be at risk for lasting changes in brain structure that can affect adult sexual behavior, according to a new study involving rats. While researchers emphasize that the results might not apply in humans, some scientists say they raise the possibility that during a vulnerable window in pregnancy and infancy, these drugs could alter developing human brains, too. Known as COX-2 inhibitors, this class of anti-inflammatories includes aspirin, acetaminophen, ibuprofen and indomethacin.
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NEWS
July 29, 2002
Dr. David Tapper, a Baltimore-born pediatric surgeon, died of kidney cancer Tuesday at his home in Mercer Island, Wash. He was 57 and lived in Northwest Baltimore until 1970. For 18 years, Tapper was surgeon-in-chief at Children's Hospital and Regional Medical Center in Seattle. He was also professor and vice chairman of surgery at the University of Washington School of Medicine. He specialized in children's kidney transplants and treating tumors. Tapper was raised on Yosemite Avenue and graduated in 1963 from City College, where he served as class treasurer.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN REPORTER | June 1, 2007
Dr. Nathan Carliner, a cardiologist and University of Maryland School of Medicine professor who practiced at the downtown Veterans Affairs Medical Center, died of bone cancer Tuesday at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Cross Keys resident was 66. Born in Baltimore and raised on South Road in Mount Washington, known as "Pill Hill" for the many medical professionals who lived there, he was the son of Dr. Paul Carliner, who in 1947 co-discovered Dramamine. "My father died of a heart attack at age 46 in 1956.
NEWS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2002
In the two decades since John Hinckley was acquitted by reason of insanity in the shooting of President Ronald Reagan, Texas and many other states have made it almost impossible for criminal defendants to be acquitted because of mental illness. In a case that shocked the nation, Andrea Yates was found guilty Tuesday of drowning her five children by a Houston jury that rejected her claim that she was insane at the time of the killings. The sentencing phase of her trial begins today. She could be sentenced to death.
NEWS
By BRADLEY OLSON and BRADLEY OLSON,SUN REPORTER | February 26, 2006
Dr. Catherine A. Neill, a pioneering and world-renowned pediatric cardiologist and faculty member at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, died Thursday of cancer at a hospice in Wimbledon, England. The Charles Village resident was 84. A pioneer in various areas of pediatric cardiology, she was the first to recognize and name in 1960 the "scimitar syndrome," which a Hopkins news release described as "a cardio-pulmonary defect in which the pulmonary veins from an abnormally developed right lung drain into the inferior vena cava; on X-ray, the defects resembles a curved sword, or scimitar."
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 8, 2003
IS THERE A biological basis for homosexuality? With gay marriage now supported by Massachusetts' highest court and homosexuality likely to be a hot issue in the presidential campaign, the question of whether sexual orientation is an innate or acquired trait is increasingly urgent. Since at least 1991, some scientific research has suggested that there is a biological basis to homosexuality - meaning sexual orientation is at least partly natural destiny, not a choice. But that point is open to debate, and our understanding is still fuzzy.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2005
Dr. W. Leigh Thompson, a former Johns Hopkins School of Medicine faculty member who was a pioneer in developing intensive care units and a leading clinical pharmacologist, died of pulmonary fibrosis Feb. 11 at a hospital in Charleston, S.C. He was 66. Born in Charleston, he earned a degree in biology at the College of Charleston and a master's degree and a doctorate at the Medical University of South Carolina. He earned his medical degree in 1965 from Johns Hopkins and remained at the hospital for his residency and several years of research.
NEWS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | October 20, 1997
Mette Strand, a professor at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and pioneer in the research of parasitic diseases, died of cancer Oct. 10 in Niva, Denmark. She was 60.An indefatigable scientist, the Danish-born Dr. Strand dedicated herself to finding a cure for schistosomiasis, a debilitating illness that affects 200 million people, mostly in tropical countries. As head of the school's pharmacology graduate program, she trained some of the most promising young minds on campus.
NEWS
April 5, 1991
A memorial service for Dr. Ronald G. Michels, a Baltimore ophthalmologist, will be held at noon April 25 in Turner Auditorium, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine where he taught and practiced for a number of years.Dr. Michels died Jan. 15 while awaiting a heart transplant.Personal friends are invited to write about their relationship with Dr. Michels for inclusion in a book for his survivors, his wife, Alice, and their two children, Randy and Allison. The deadline is April 15.The writings should be faxed to Dr. Walter J. Stark at (301)
NEWS
March 13, 2005
On March 10, 2005, DR. W. NEWTON LONG, former faculty member of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine; devoted husband of Nancy Masters Long and the late Mary Myers Long; devoted father of Wilmer Newton Long, III and Alice Long Gersh; loving brother of Howard Franklin Long; dear grandfather of Olga and Elizabeth Robinson and Levi Long. A Memorial Service will be held at later date. Those desiring may make memorial donations to the Musical Organ Fund of St. Bartholomew's Church, 4711 Edmondson Avenue, Baltimore, MD 21229-1440 or to the W. Newton Long Lectureship Fund of W. Newton Long Scholarship Fund of the American College of Nurse Midwives, C/O Emory University School of Medicine Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, 1639 Pierce Dr., Atlanta, GA 30322.
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