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NEWS
August 21, 1994
The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine admitted 63 women and 57 men to its fall class. It's the first time in the school's 101-year history that more women than men have been enrolled in an incoming class. The school's first class in 1893 had just three women. Article, Page 6B.
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NEWS
By Rona Marech and Rona Marech,sun reporter | July 30, 2007
An 18-year-old driver, who might have fallen asleep at the wheel, struck and killed a Johns Hopkins obstetrician-gynecologist who was fixing the chain on his bicycle Saturday morning on the side of the road in Dewey Beach, Del., police said. Dr. John G. Griffith, 44, of Timonium, an assistant professor at the School of Medicine and director of the hospital's Fibroid Center, died at the scene on Coastal Highway, Delaware State Police said. He had been vacationing with his family. According to police, the driver, Barry Boulden of Millsboro, Del., drifted onto the shoulder, hit Griffith with his 2002 Pontiac Grand Am, then swerved and crossed south- and northbound lanes and a grass median before stopping on the side of the road.
NEWS
November 17, 2006
Dr. William M. Goldstein, a psychiatrist who taught and wrote about his field, died of cancer yesterday at his Rockville home. He was 63. Born in Baltimore and raised in the Howard Park neighborhood, he was a 1960 graduate of City College and earned a bachelor's degree from Oberlin College in Ohio. He was a graduate of the University of Maryland School of Medicine. Dr. Goldstein, who practiced in Chevy Chase for many years, joined the faculty of Georgetown University School of Medicine in 1975 and taught its psychiatric residents the principles of psychotherapy and psychoanalysis.
FEATURES
May 8, 2008
Dr. Mark A. Deitch has joined OrthoMaryland, a Baltimore orthopedic practice. Deitch specializes in surgery of the hand and upper body, including the shoulder and elbow. He works as an assistant clinical professor at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. He was trained at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York and finished a University of Cincinnati Mary S. Stern Hand and Microvascular Fellowship. He earned his bachelor's degree at Brown University in Providence, R.I., and medical degree at the State University of New York at Stony Brook School of Medicine.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | February 9, 2004
Dr. Barnett Berman, a Baltimore internist and member of the faculty at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, died Friday at Sinai Hospital of heart failure. The Pikesville resident was 81. "He was from the old school and made house calls late into his practice if somebody needed him," said a lifelong friend, Malcolm Sherman of Guilford. "He was a doctor who blended excellence of care with compassion." Dr. Berman was born in West Baltimore and graduated from City College in 1940. He was working as an accountant and attending the University of Baltimore at night when he enlisted in the Army in 1942.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | May 18, 2007
Your first clue is right there in the waiting room of Dr. Stephen A. Valenti's cardiology practice, HPV Heart, P.A. in Columbia. There, among the typical waiting-room magazines serving up the standard news, diet and fitness fare, is the latest issue of Rolling Stone. Valenti, 55, is a committed physician who acknowledges that he does not get to listen to music in the car because he is usually playing "medical CDs" so he can "keep up on stuff" in the field of cardiology. But his passion for music will be expressed tonight alongside 12 of his regular band members and three guests when his band, Stevie V. & The Heart Attackers, performs at the Bicentennial Gala for the University of Maryland School of Medicine at the Baltimore Convention Center.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2004
Fetuses and newborns exposed to some common anti-inflammatory drugs may be at risk for lasting changes in brain structure that can affect adult sexual behavior, according to a new study involving rats. While researchers emphasize that the results might not apply in humans, some scientists say they raise the possibility that during a vulnerable window in pregnancy and infancy, these drugs could alter developing human brains, too. Known as COX-2 inhibitors, this class of anti-inflammatories includes aspirin, acetaminophen, ibuprofen and indomethacin.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | November 18, 2005
Dr. William G. Speed III, a Johns Hopkins physician and teacher who studied the common headache when there was little scientific interest in it and became one of its leading experts, died of congestive heart failure Tuesday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The former Roland Park resident was 87. While an undergraduate at Trinity College in Hartford, Conn., Dr. Speed became interested in headaches when he awoke one morning in severe pain, which he was told was caused by a migraine. In an autobiographical sketch, Dr. Speed recalled being annoyed by the physician he consulted the next day who seemed to know little about headaches.
NEWS
October 1, 1990
Services for Dr. G. Bowers Mansdorfer, a retired pediatrician who cared for four generations of Baltimore families, will be held at 10 a.m. tomorrow at the First English Lutheran Church, Charles and 39th streets.Dr. Mansdorfer, who lived and had an office on North Charles Street, died of heart failure Friday at his daughter's home in Timonium. He was 86.Born in Baltimore, he graduated from Gettysburg College in 1926 and was a 1930 graduate of the University of Maryland School of Medicine.
NEWS
April 5, 1991
A memorial service for Dr. Ronald G. Michels, a Baltimore ophthalmologist, will be held at noon April 25 in Turner Auditorium, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine where he taught and practiced for a number of years.Dr. Michels died Jan. 15 while awaiting a heart transplant.Personal friends are invited to write about their relationship with Dr. Michels for inclusion in a book for his survivors, his wife, Alice, and their two children, Randy and Allison. The deadline is April 15.The writings should be faxed to Dr. Walter J. Stark at (301)
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