Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSchool Of Medicine
IN THE NEWS

School Of Medicine

NEWS
September 2, 2003
On August 30, 2003, MICHELLE Y. KHOURY; devoted daughter of Osama and Gloria Khoury; dear sister of John and Nicole Khoury; loving aunt of Julian and loving friend to all. Service and interment private. Contributions may be made in her memory to John Hopkins School of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, 601 N. Caroline St. Baltimore MD 21287-0960.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 21, 1994
The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine admitted 63 women and 57 men to its fall class. It's the first time in the school's 101-year history that more women than men have been enrolled in an incoming class. The school's first class in 1893 had just three women. Article, Page 6B.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2005
Dr. W. Leigh Thompson, a former Johns Hopkins School of Medicine faculty member who was a pioneer in developing intensive care units and a leading clinical pharmacologist, died of pulmonary fibrosis Feb. 11 at a hospital in Charleston, S.C. He was 66. Born in Charleston, he earned a degree in biology at the College of Charleston and a master's degree and a doctorate at the Medical University of South Carolina. He earned his medical degree in 1965 from Johns Hopkins and remained at the hospital for his residency and several years of research.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | February 9, 2004
Dr. Barnett Berman, a Baltimore internist and member of the faculty at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, died Friday at Sinai Hospital of heart failure. The Pikesville resident was 81. "He was from the old school and made house calls late into his practice if somebody needed him," said a lifelong friend, Malcolm Sherman of Guilford. "He was a doctor who blended excellence of care with compassion." Dr. Berman was born in West Baltimore and graduated from City College in 1940. He was working as an accountant and attending the University of Baltimore at night when he enlisted in the Army in 1942.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance | January 21, 1992
Dr. James A. Block, president and chief executive officer at University Hospitals in Cleveland, was named today to be president of the Johns Hopkins Hospital and Health System.Dr. Block, 51, will succeed Dr. Robert M. Heyssel, who will retire July 1 after 20 years in the hospital's top post."We have found a president we believe will not only maintain the standard of excellence expected of Hopkins, but will also advance the quality of health care in the years ahead," said H. Furlong Baldwin, chairman of Hopkins' board of trustees.
NEWS
By Euna Lhee and Euna Lhee,Sun Reporter | June 24, 2008
On a typical weekday, Richard Bauer jogs 21/2 miles near his White Marsh home and then drives to Baltimore, where he is a first-year radiography student. After a full day of lectures, he likes to relax by reading Japanese Performance and Motorcyclist. "But free time is rare," he says with a grin. Life wasn't always this way for Bauer. In recent years, he couldn't muster the strength to get out of bed. In 2004, he was diagnosed with an aggressive form of multiple sclerosis, which left him paralyzed and in a wheelchair for more than a year.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2004
Fetuses and newborns exposed to some common anti-inflammatory drugs may be at risk for lasting changes in brain structure that can affect adult sexual behavior, according to a new study involving rats. While researchers emphasize that the results might not apply in humans, some scientists say they raise the possibility that during a vulnerable window in pregnancy and infancy, these drugs could alter developing human brains, too. Known as COX-2 inhibitors, this class of anti-inflammatories includes aspirin, acetaminophen, ibuprofen and indomethacin.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | February 19, 1995
Dr. William G. Marr, a retired ophthalmologist, died Feb. 10 at his Greenspring Valley home of complications from Parkinson's disease. He was 78.Dr. Marr, who practiced ophthalmology for 34 years from his office at 10 E. Chase St., retired in 1983 because of illness.Dr. Robert B. Welch, an ophthalmologist and associate professor of ophthalmology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and former director of the retina clinic at The Wilmer Institute, described Dr. Marr as an "excellent surgeon."
NEWS
March 13, 2005
On March 10, 2005, DR. W. NEWTON LONG, former faculty member of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine; devoted husband of Nancy Masters Long and the late Mary Myers Long; devoted father of Wilmer Newton Long, III and Alice Long Gersh; loving brother of Howard Franklin Long; dear grandfather of Olga and Elizabeth Robinson and Levi Long. A Memorial Service will be held at later date. Those desiring may make memorial donations to the Musical Organ Fund of St. Bartholomew's Church, 4711 Edmondson Avenue, Baltimore, MD 21229-1440 or to the W. Newton Long Lectureship Fund of W. Newton Long Scholarship Fund of the American College of Nurse Midwives, C/O Emory University School of Medicine Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, 1639 Pierce Dr., Atlanta, GA 30322.
NEWS
April 5, 1991
A memorial service for Dr. Ronald G. Michels, a Baltimore ophthalmologist, will be held at noon April 25 in Turner Auditorium, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine where he taught and practiced for a number of years.Dr. Michels died Jan. 15 while awaiting a heart transplant.Personal friends are invited to write about their relationship with Dr. Michels for inclusion in a book for his survivors, his wife, Alice, and their two children, Randy and Allison. The deadline is April 15.The writings should be faxed to Dr. Walter J. Stark at (301)
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.