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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | March 15, 2005
Dr. Jerome D. Frank, a retired John Hopkins professor of psychiatry who was widely known as an early and outspoken critic of nuclear weapons, died yesterday of complications from dementia at Roland Park Place, his home for the past nine years. He was 95. A New York City native educated at Harvard University and its medical school, Dr. Frank came to the Hopkins in 1940 as a junior assistant resident to study under Dr. Adolf Meyer, founder of its department of psychiatry. After several years, he became an Army psychiatrist and served with Hopkins physicians in the Pacific -- an experience that gave him insight into the psychological effects of war on the health and well-being of soldiers.
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NEWS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2002
In the two decades since John Hinckley was acquitted by reason of insanity in the shooting of President Ronald Reagan, Texas and many other states have made it almost impossible for criminal defendants to be acquitted because of mental illness. In a case that shocked the nation, Andrea Yates was found guilty Tuesday of drowning her five children by a Houston jury that rejected her claim that she was insane at the time of the killings. The sentencing phase of her trial begins today. She could be sentenced to death.
NEWS
September 17, 2002
Surgeon joins staff at Md. Vascular Center Vascular surgeon Dr. Vasana Cheanvechai of Baltimore was joined the Maryland Vascular Center at North Arundel Hospital. A graduate of Princeton University, Cheanvechai received her medical degree from Northwestern University Medical School in Chicago. She completed a fellowships in vascular surgery at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore and Northwestern. Cheanvechai is an assistant professor of vascular surgery at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and is board certified in general surgery.
FEATURES
By Janet Cromley and Janet Cromley,Los Angeles Times | October 11, 2007
You've been in psychotherapy for awhile, and you're feeling better. Much better. Is it time to quit? The answer is based, in large part, on the type of treatment. "When to end therapy depends on context and diagnosis," says Dr. Gary Kennedy, director of geriatric psychiatry at Montefiore Medical Center in New York. Certain types of treatment, such as cognitive behavior therapy, are designed to relieve disorders such as mild depression or anxiety in a short period, and the end is almost predetermined.
NEWS
September 25, 2002
Dr. Thomas Bourne Turner: Services for Dr. Thomas Bourne Turner, dean emeritus of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, will be held at 11 a.m. today at Memorial Episcopal Church, Bolton Street and Lafayette Avenue, where he was a member. Dr. Turner died Sunday at his Bolton Hill home at age 100.
NEWS
March 31, 1995
An article in Wednesday's editions of The Sun misidentified the plaintiff in a lawsuit challenging an affirmative action program at the University of Maryland College Park. Daniel J. Podberesky is now a student at the University of Maryland at Baltimore School of Medicine.The Sun regrets the errors.
NEWS
January 27, 2007
A headline for the obituary of Dr. Hugo Moser in Wednesday's editions of The Sun described him as a "Hopkins doctor." While Dr. Moser was on the faculty of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, his principal work was with the Kennedy Krieger Institute, which is affiliated with Hopkins but independent of it.
NEWS
January 2, 2001
People Surgeon: North Arundel Hospital announced the addition of orthopedic surgeon Douglas G. Wright of Aberdeen to its medical staff. Wright was a clinical instructor in orthopedic surgery at Yale University's school of medicine. His clinical interests include diabetic foot disease, ankle trauma and ankle reconstruction and replacements.
NEWS
August 21, 1994
The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine admitted 63 women and 57 men to its fall class. It's the first time in the school's 101-year history that more women than men have been enrolled in an incoming class. The school's first class in 1893 had just three women. Article, Page 6B.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,Sun Staff Writer | April 24, 1995
Dr. Marion Carlyle Crenshaw Jr., chairman of the University of Maryland School of Medicine's Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology since 1980, was killed in a weekend traffic accident when he swerved to avoid a dog.Dr. Crenshaw, 64, who lived in Baltimore's Guilford section, was driving to his country home in Easton in a minivan after dropping off his wife at Baltimore-Washington International Airport when the accident occurred about 5 p.m. Saturday on U.S. 50 near Skipton Creek in Talbot County.
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