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By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | May 8, 2002
When Desta Fisseha was growing up in Ethiopia her grandmother told her that education was the path to independence and a better life. That meant sacrifices along the way, like wearing her hair chopped short and making herself plain so boys wouldn't call and interrupt her studies. Fisseha brought versions of these rules to the raising of her children. "I didn't allow sleepovers or watching TV," she said. "And there was no dating until they finished high school." Now, based on their academic and personal achievements, Fasika and Tinsay Woreta, her identical twin daughters, have won graduate-study scholarships worth $400,000.
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NEWS
September 25, 2002
Dr. Thomas Bourne Turner: Services for Dr. Thomas Bourne Turner, dean emeritus of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, will be held at 11 a.m. today at Memorial Episcopal Church, Bolton Street and Lafayette Avenue, where he was a member. Dr. Turner died Sunday at his Bolton Hill home at age 100.
NEWS
March 31, 1995
An article in Wednesday's editions of The Sun misidentified the plaintiff in a lawsuit challenging an affirmative action program at the University of Maryland College Park. Daniel J. Podberesky is now a student at the University of Maryland at Baltimore School of Medicine.The Sun regrets the errors.
NEWS
January 27, 2007
A headline for the obituary of Dr. Hugo Moser in Wednesday's editions of The Sun described him as a "Hopkins doctor." While Dr. Moser was on the faculty of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, his principal work was with the Kennedy Krieger Institute, which is affiliated with Hopkins but independent of it.
NEWS
January 2, 2001
People Surgeon: North Arundel Hospital announced the addition of orthopedic surgeon Douglas G. Wright of Aberdeen to its medical staff. Wright was a clinical instructor in orthopedic surgery at Yale University's school of medicine. His clinical interests include diabetic foot disease, ankle trauma and ankle reconstruction and replacements.
NEWS
September 2, 2003
On August 30, 2003, MICHELLE Y. KHOURY; devoted daughter of Osama and Gloria Khoury; dear sister of John and Nicole Khoury; loving aunt of Julian and loving friend to all. Service and interment private. Contributions may be made in her memory to John Hopkins School of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, 601 N. Caroline St. Baltimore MD 21287-0960.
NEWS
August 21, 1994
The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine admitted 63 women and 57 men to its fall class. It's the first time in the school's 101-year history that more women than men have been enrolled in an incoming class. The school's first class in 1893 had just three women. Article, Page 6B.
NEWS
November 26, 1993
Dr. E. S. Stafford, retired Hopkins surgery professorEdward Stephen Stafford, a professor emeritus of surgery at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, died of pneumonia Nov. 18 at Menno Haven Nursing Home in Chambersburg, Pa., where he had lived for about 10 years. He was 87.Dr. Stafford retired from Hopkins in 1977 after working there for about 50 years.He was assistant dean of the Hopkins School of Medicine from 1967 to 1971 and associate dean from 1971 to 1974.He was in private practice in general and thoracic surgery from 1946 to 1977.
NEWS
By New York Times | August 21, 1994
Dr. John J. Bonica, an anesthesiologist and leader in the effort to understand pain and cope with it, died Monday at St. Mary's Hospital in Rochester, Minn., where he was being treated at the Mayo Clinic. The resident of Mercer Island, Wash., was 77.He died of a cerebral hemorrhage, said the University of Washington School of Medicine, where the doctor was a professor and chairman emeritus of the Department of Anesthesiology.Born in Italy, Dr. Bonica came to this country in 1927 and worked his way through school, graduating from medical school in 1942.
NEWS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2002
In the two decades since John Hinckley was acquitted by reason of insanity in the shooting of President Ronald Reagan, Texas and many other states have made it almost impossible for criminal defendants to be acquitted because of mental illness. In a case that shocked the nation, Andrea Yates was found guilty Tuesday of drowning her five children by a Houston jury that rejected her claim that she was insane at the time of the killings. The sentencing phase of her trial begins today. She could be sentenced to death.
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