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NEWS
January 27, 2007
A headline for the obituary of Dr. Hugo Moser in Wednesday's editions of The Sun described him as a "Hopkins doctor." While Dr. Moser was on the faculty of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, his principal work was with the Kennedy Krieger Institute, which is affiliated with Hopkins but independent of it.
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NEWS
January 2, 2001
People Surgeon: North Arundel Hospital announced the addition of orthopedic surgeon Douglas G. Wright of Aberdeen to its medical staff. Wright was a clinical instructor in orthopedic surgery at Yale University's school of medicine. His clinical interests include diabetic foot disease, ankle trauma and ankle reconstruction and replacements.
NEWS
August 21, 1994
The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine admitted 63 women and 57 men to its fall class. It's the first time in the school's 101-year history that more women than men have been enrolled in an incoming class. The school's first class in 1893 had just three women. Article, Page 6B.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | July 31, 2007
Dr. John G. Griffith, an obstetrician-gynecologist who was an assistant professor at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and director of the hospital's Fibroid Center, died Saturday in Dewey Beach, Del., after being hit by a car. The Timonium resident was 44. Dr. Griffith, who had been vacationing in Rehoboth Beach, Del., with his family, was on the shoulder of the Coastal Highway repairing his broken bicycle chain when he was hit. He was...
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | March 15, 2005
Dr. Jerome D. Frank, a retired John Hopkins professor of psychiatry who was widely known as an early and outspoken critic of nuclear weapons, died yesterday of complications from dementia at Roland Park Place, his home for the past nine years. He was 95. A New York City native educated at Harvard University and its medical school, Dr. Frank came to the Hopkins in 1940 as a junior assistant resident to study under Dr. Adolf Meyer, founder of its department of psychiatry. After several years, he became an Army psychiatrist and served with Hopkins physicians in the Pacific -- an experience that gave him insight into the psychological effects of war on the health and well-being of soldiers.
FEATURES
By Alice Steinbach and Alice Steinbach,SUN STAFF | October 29, 1995
WASHINGTON -- She has lived her life dangerously close to the edge, soaring at times to the heights of creativity and pleasure, then crashing precipitously into the depths of despair and madness. More than most, Kay Redfield Jamison, a woman of great accomplishment, knows what it's like to teeter on cliffs of violent, terrifying, uncontrollable emotion.And, more than most, she knows what it feels like to lose your footing and fall."Losing your mind is far and away the most terrifying thing you can experience," Kay Jamison says now, recalling a particularly bad episode of "madness" that occurred in her late 20s. "You are your mind.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | April 1, 2006
Dr. Donald Frederick Proctor, a noted Johns Hopkins School of Medicine otolaryngologist who also had careers in anesthesiology and environmental sciences, died of pneumonia Tuesday at Roland Park Place. He was 92. Born in Red Bank, N.J., he moved to Towson, where he graduated from Towson High School in 1929. Torn between a career as an opera singer or in medicine, Dr. Proctor earned a bachelor's degree in 1933 at the Johns Hopkins University, while simultaneously studying voice at the Peabody Conservatory of Music and the Juilliard School in New York.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2005
Dr. W. Leigh Thompson, a former Johns Hopkins School of Medicine faculty member who was a pioneer in developing intensive care units and a leading clinical pharmacologist, died of pulmonary fibrosis Feb. 11 at a hospital in Charleston, S.C. He was 66. Born in Charleston, he earned a degree in biology at the College of Charleston and a master's degree and a doctorate at the Medical University of South Carolina. He earned his medical degree in 1965 from Johns Hopkins and remained at the hospital for his residency and several years of research.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance | January 21, 1992
Dr. James A. Block, president and chief executive officer at University Hospitals in Cleveland, was named today to be president of the Johns Hopkins Hospital and Health System.Dr. Block, 51, will succeed Dr. Robert M. Heyssel, who will retire July 1 after 20 years in the hospital's top post."We have found a president we believe will not only maintain the standard of excellence expected of Hopkins, but will also advance the quality of health care in the years ahead," said H. Furlong Baldwin, chairman of Hopkins' board of trustees.
NEWS
April 5, 1991
A memorial service for Dr. Ronald G. Michels, a Baltimore ophthalmologist, will be held at noon April 25 in Turner Auditorium, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine where he taught and practiced for a number of years.Dr. Michels died Jan. 15 while awaiting a heart transplant.Personal friends are invited to write about their relationship with Dr. Michels for inclusion in a book for his survivors, his wife, Alice, and their two children, Randy and Allison. The deadline is April 15.The writings should be faxed to Dr. Walter J. Stark at (301)
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