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NEWS
September 25, 2002
Dr. Thomas Bourne Turner: Services for Dr. Thomas Bourne Turner, dean emeritus of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, will be held at 11 a.m. today at Memorial Episcopal Church, Bolton Street and Lafayette Avenue, where he was a member. Dr. Turner died Sunday at his Bolton Hill home at age 100.
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NEWS
March 31, 1995
An article in Wednesday's editions of The Sun misidentified the plaintiff in a lawsuit challenging an affirmative action program at the University of Maryland College Park. Daniel J. Podberesky is now a student at the University of Maryland at Baltimore School of Medicine.The Sun regrets the errors.
NEWS
January 27, 2007
A headline for the obituary of Dr. Hugo Moser in Wednesday's editions of The Sun described him as a "Hopkins doctor." While Dr. Moser was on the faculty of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, his principal work was with the Kennedy Krieger Institute, which is affiliated with Hopkins but independent of it.
NEWS
January 2, 2001
People Surgeon: North Arundel Hospital announced the addition of orthopedic surgeon Douglas G. Wright of Aberdeen to its medical staff. Wright was a clinical instructor in orthopedic surgery at Yale University's school of medicine. His clinical interests include diabetic foot disease, ankle trauma and ankle reconstruction and replacements.
NEWS
August 21, 1994
The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine admitted 63 women and 57 men to its fall class. It's the first time in the school's 101-year history that more women than men have been enrolled in an incoming class. The school's first class in 1893 had just three women. Article, Page 6B.
NEWS
September 2, 2003
On August 30, 2003, MICHELLE Y. KHOURY; devoted daughter of Osama and Gloria Khoury; dear sister of John and Nicole Khoury; loving aunt of Julian and loving friend to all. Service and interment private. Contributions may be made in her memory to John Hopkins School of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, 601 N. Caroline St. Baltimore MD 21287-0960.
NEWS
October 1, 1990
Services for Dr. G. Bowers Mansdorfer, a retired pediatrician who cared for four generations of Baltimore families, will be held at 10 a.m. tomorrow at the First English Lutheran Church, Charles and 39th streets.Dr. Mansdorfer, who lived and had an office on North Charles Street, died of heart failure Friday at his daughter's home in Timonium. He was 86.Born in Baltimore, he graduated from Gettysburg College in 1926 and was a 1930 graduate of the University of Maryland School of Medicine.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | January 15, 2008
Dr. Herbert Copeland Jr., a retired Franklin Square Hospital Center radiologist, died of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, often referred to as Lou Gehrig's disease, Jan. 7 at a Naples, Fla., nursing home. The Lutherville resident was 87. Born in Wheeling, W.Va., he earned a bachelor's degree at West Virginia University and a medical degree at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. In 1951, he became Franklin Square Hospital's radiologist and was president of the institution's medical staff from 1970 to 1972.
FEATURES
September 6, 2007
Dr. Phuong X. Nguyen has joined the surgical department at Mercy Medical Center, where he will focus on general surgery. Nguyen graduated from the University of Colorado at Boulder and earned his medical degree from the University of Colorado School of Medicine. Bonnie Eareckson has been appointed the chief of human resource management service for the Veterans Affairs Maryland Health Care System. Eareckson earned her undergraduate degree in 1983 from Southern Career Institute. Dr. Deepak Kashyap has joined the Endocrine and Diabetes Center at Franklin Square Hospital Center.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2004
Fetuses and newborns exposed to some common anti-inflammatory drugs may be at risk for lasting changes in brain structure that can affect adult sexual behavior, according to a new study involving rats. While researchers emphasize that the results might not apply in humans, some scientists say they raise the possibility that during a vulnerable window in pregnancy and infancy, these drugs could alter developing human brains, too. Known as COX-2 inhibitors, this class of anti-inflammatories includes aspirin, acetaminophen, ibuprofen and indomethacin.
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