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NEWS
April 5, 1991
A memorial service for Dr. Ronald G. Michels, a Baltimore ophthalmologist, will be held at noon April 25 in Turner Auditorium, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine where he taught and practiced for a number of years.Dr. Michels died Jan. 15 while awaiting a heart transplant.Personal friends are invited to write about their relationship with Dr. Michels for inclusion in a book for his survivors, his wife, Alice, and their two children, Randy and Allison. The deadline is April 15.The writings should be faxed to Dr. Walter J. Stark at (301)
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NEWS
By Frederick Rasmussen and Frederick Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 15, 2000
Dr. Philip Franklin Wagley, a prominent Baltimore internist who created and taught a highly regarded course in medical ethics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, died Thursday of bone marrow cancer at his home in the Woodbrook section of Baltimore County. He was 83. From his office in an elegant brownstone townhouse at 9 E. Chase St., next to the Belvedere Hotel, Dr. Wagley practiced internal medicine from 1950 until retiring in 1990. Through the years, his patients included writer H.L. Mencken and poet Ogden Nash as well as the prominent and not-so-prominent from across the world who came to Baltimore to consult with him about their ailments.
NEWS
September 25, 2002
Dr. Thomas Bourne Turner: Services for Dr. Thomas Bourne Turner, dean emeritus of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, will be held at 11 a.m. today at Memorial Episcopal Church, Bolton Street and Lafayette Avenue, where he was a member. Dr. Turner died Sunday at his Bolton Hill home at age 100.
NEWS
March 31, 1995
An article in Wednesday's editions of The Sun misidentified the plaintiff in a lawsuit challenging an affirmative action program at the University of Maryland College Park. Daniel J. Podberesky is now a student at the University of Maryland at Baltimore School of Medicine.The Sun regrets the errors.
NEWS
January 27, 2007
A headline for the obituary of Dr. Hugo Moser in Wednesday's editions of The Sun described him as a "Hopkins doctor." While Dr. Moser was on the faculty of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, his principal work was with the Kennedy Krieger Institute, which is affiliated with Hopkins but independent of it.
NEWS
January 2, 2001
People Surgeon: North Arundel Hospital announced the addition of orthopedic surgeon Douglas G. Wright of Aberdeen to its medical staff. Wright was a clinical instructor in orthopedic surgery at Yale University's school of medicine. His clinical interests include diabetic foot disease, ankle trauma and ankle reconstruction and replacements.
NEWS
August 21, 1994
The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine admitted 63 women and 57 men to its fall class. It's the first time in the school's 101-year history that more women than men have been enrolled in an incoming class. The school's first class in 1893 had just three women. Article, Page 6B.
NEWS
September 2, 2003
On August 30, 2003, MICHELLE Y. KHOURY; devoted daughter of Osama and Gloria Khoury; dear sister of John and Nicole Khoury; loving aunt of Julian and loving friend to all. Service and interment private. Contributions may be made in her memory to John Hopkins School of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, 601 N. Caroline St. Baltimore MD 21287-0960.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | July 18, 2007
Dr. Donald F. Klein, a retired pediatrician and medical school professor who was an advocate for the mentally disabled, died of a blood disorder Thursday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The longtime Stevenson resident was 79. Born and raised in Brooklyn, N.Y., Dr. Klein was the son of a physician whose office was next door to home. He earned a bachelor's degree in 1949 from the Johns Hopkins University and graduated from Yale University School of Medicine in 1954. After completing an internship at Bellevue Hospital in New York City, he served two years as a captain with an Air Force medical unit at Maxwell Air Force Base in Alabama.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 8, 2003
IS THERE A biological basis for homosexuality? With gay marriage now supported by Massachusetts' highest court and homosexuality likely to be a hot issue in the presidential campaign, the question of whether sexual orientation is an innate or acquired trait is increasingly urgent. Since at least 1991, some scientific research has suggested that there is a biological basis to homosexuality - meaning sexual orientation is at least partly natural destiny, not a choice. But that point is open to debate, and our understanding is still fuzzy.
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