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NEWS
March 31, 1995
An article in Wednesday's editions of The Sun misidentified the plaintiff in a lawsuit challenging an affirmative action program at the University of Maryland College Park. Daniel J. Podberesky is now a student at the University of Maryland at Baltimore School of Medicine.The Sun regrets the errors.
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NEWS
January 27, 2007
A headline for the obituary of Dr. Hugo Moser in Wednesday's editions of The Sun described him as a "Hopkins doctor." While Dr. Moser was on the faculty of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, his principal work was with the Kennedy Krieger Institute, which is affiliated with Hopkins but independent of it.
NEWS
January 2, 2001
People Surgeon: North Arundel Hospital announced the addition of orthopedic surgeon Douglas G. Wright of Aberdeen to its medical staff. Wright was a clinical instructor in orthopedic surgery at Yale University's school of medicine. His clinical interests include diabetic foot disease, ankle trauma and ankle reconstruction and replacements.
NEWS
August 21, 1994
The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine admitted 63 women and 57 men to its fall class. It's the first time in the school's 101-year history that more women than men have been enrolled in an incoming class. The school's first class in 1893 had just three women. Article, Page 6B.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | July 31, 2007
Dr. John G. Griffith, an obstetrician-gynecologist who was an assistant professor at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and director of the hospital's Fibroid Center, died Saturday in Dewey Beach, Del., after being hit by a car. The Timonium resident was 44. Dr. Griffith, who had been vacationing in Rehoboth Beach, Del., with his family, was on the shoulder of the Coastal Highway repairing his broken bicycle chain when he was hit. He was...
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2004
Fetuses and newborns exposed to some common anti-inflammatory drugs may be at risk for lasting changes in brain structure that can affect adult sexual behavior, according to a new study involving rats. While researchers emphasize that the results might not apply in humans, some scientists say they raise the possibility that during a vulnerable window in pregnancy and infancy, these drugs could alter developing human brains, too. Known as COX-2 inhibitors, this class of anti-inflammatories includes aspirin, acetaminophen, ibuprofen and indomethacin.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance | January 21, 1992
Dr. James A. Block, president and chief executive officer at University Hospitals in Cleveland, was named today to be president of the Johns Hopkins Hospital and Health System.Dr. Block, 51, will succeed Dr. Robert M. Heyssel, who will retire July 1 after 20 years in the hospital's top post."We have found a president we believe will not only maintain the standard of excellence expected of Hopkins, but will also advance the quality of health care in the years ahead," said H. Furlong Baldwin, chairman of Hopkins' board of trustees.
NEWS
By Euna Lhee and Euna Lhee,Sun Reporter | June 24, 2008
On a typical weekday, Richard Bauer jogs 21/2 miles near his White Marsh home and then drives to Baltimore, where he is a first-year radiography student. After a full day of lectures, he likes to relax by reading Japanese Performance and Motorcyclist. "But free time is rare," he says with a grin. Life wasn't always this way for Bauer. In recent years, he couldn't muster the strength to get out of bed. In 2004, he was diagnosed with an aggressive form of multiple sclerosis, which left him paralyzed and in a wheelchair for more than a year.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | May 8, 2002
When Desta Fisseha was growing up in Ethiopia her grandmother told her that education was the path to independence and a better life. That meant sacrifices along the way, like wearing her hair chopped short and making herself plain so boys wouldn't call and interrupt her studies. Fisseha brought versions of these rules to the raising of her children. "I didn't allow sleepovers or watching TV," she said. "And there was no dating until they finished high school." Now, based on their academic and personal achievements, Fasika and Tinsay Woreta, her identical twin daughters, have won graduate-study scholarships worth $400,000.
NEWS
April 5, 1991
A memorial service for Dr. Ronald G. Michels, a Baltimore ophthalmologist, will be held at noon April 25 in Turner Auditorium, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine where he taught and practiced for a number of years.Dr. Michels died Jan. 15 while awaiting a heart transplant.Personal friends are invited to write about their relationship with Dr. Michels for inclusion in a book for his survivors, his wife, Alice, and their two children, Randy and Allison. The deadline is April 15.The writings should be faxed to Dr. Walter J. Stark at (301)
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