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By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | May 23, 1991
Dr. Donald E. Wilson, chairman of medicine at the State University of New York Health Science Center at Brooklyn, today was named dean of the University of Maryland School of Medicine.Wilson, 54, becomes the nation's first black dean of an accredited medical school that is not predominantly minority.Wilson, who assumes his duties in September, is the first black dean at the University of Maryland at Baltimore, a campus of six professional schools. His salary will be $225,000 a year.Wilson replaces Dr. Richard D. Richards, who has served as acting dean since July 1990 when Dr. John M. Dennis retired as dean, a post he had held for 16 years.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2014
Dr. M. Daniel Lane, a retired Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine researcher, biochemist and esteemed teacher who studied the body's chemical processes that affect hunger, died of myeloma April 10 at the Charlestown Retirement Community. The former Mount Washington resident was 83. Colleagues said he typically arrived at his classroom at 6 a.m. and filled numerous sliding blackboards with notes for the day's material. These became known as the "Lane Lectures. " Dr. Paul Rothman, chief executive officer of Johns Hopkins Medicine and dean of the medical faculty, called Dr. Lane "a premier scientist and one of our most cherished colleagues.
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NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2002
Viiu Ann Vellisto Klein, a native of Estonia and a laboratory technician at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine since 1975, died Monday of cancer at her home in Perry Hall. She was 66. "We had a surprise party for her last year, and people came from all over the world," said Dr. Paul T. Englund, who heads the Hopkins lab where she worked studying the biochemistry of parasitic protozoa. Mrs. Klein's role went beyond conducting experiments, and she befriended graduate students studying to become scientists.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2014
William A. Edelstein, a pioneer in the field of MRI who was also a professor in the radiology department at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, died Feb. 10 of lung cancer at his home in Original Northwood. He was 69. The son of Arthur Edelstein, an optometrist, and Hannah Edelstein, a homemaker, William AlanEdelstein was born in Gloversville, N.Y., and raised in Schenectady and Utica, N.Y., and Northbrook, Ill., where he graduated in 1961 from Glenbrook High School.
NEWS
By Helby Selby | November 17, 2008
As people live longer and suffer from more chronic diseases, the risk of inappropriately using drugs or overmedicating increases among the elderly, says Susan Zieman, geriatric cardiologist and assistant professor of medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Most elderly people are on multiple medications and frequently metabolize drugs differently from younger people, she says. The drugs may build up in their systems and interact with other drugs in unexpected ways.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,liz.atwood@baltsun.com | February 23, 2009
Whooping cough sounds like one of those old-fashioned diseases that only the heroines of Victorian novels get. But whooping cough, or pertussis, is a serious and sometimes fatal illness that has been on the rise in the United States in recent years, says Virginia Keane, associate professor of pediatrics at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and president of the Maryland chapter of the Academy of Pediatrics. What is whooping cough? A bacterial infection caused by the bacteria Bordetella pertussis.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun reporter | February 29, 2008
Dr. Benjamin Franklin Trump, the retired pathology department chair at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, died of heart disease Tuesday at Sinai Hospital. The Roland Park resident was 75. He was also among the founders of the Shock Trauma Center and worked closely with Dr. R Adams Cowley to create the Shock Trauma research program. He was a past chairman of the state's Postmortem Examiners Commission, where he oversaw the office of Maryland's chief medical examiner. "While at Maryland, Dr. Trump was able to bring the fields of electron microscopy, immunohistology, human cell and tissue culture and computer science into the forefront of pathology for both research and patient care," said Dr. Raymond Jones, a former student who is now professor of pathology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and a Westminster resident.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,liz.atwood@baltsun.com | April 13, 2009
Travel season is approaching, and those flying to Europe or heading to the West Coast can expect to experience jet lag. The fatigue, stomach upset and disorientation that occurs is normal, says Dr. Andrea Meredith, assistant professor of physiology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. She offers some suggestions on how to deal with the discomfort. Why do people feel so crummy when they move across time zones? Jet lag, which is what you are referring to, is a disruption of the circadian rhythms.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,Sun reporter | February 25, 2007
Ranice W. Crosby, an accomplished medical illustrator and the first woman to be a department head at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, died in her sleep on Feb. 18 at Keswick Multi-Care Center in Baltimore. She was 91. The daughter of a salesman and a bookkeeper, Ranice W. Birch was born in Regina, Saskatchewan. Upon completing high school in Providence, R.I., she attended the Connecticut College for Women, graduating in 1937. She took a job at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in 1937 and began her studies in medical illustration under the department's first director, Max Brodel.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | September 6, 2003
His face set in stony concentration, Swiss engineer Karoly Molnar moved quickly between his monitors and the frosty, 13-foot creation that he was bringing to life in a basement at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore. As Molnar carefully injected electric current and balanced it with hundreds of gallons of cooling liquid helium, one of the most powerful superconducting magnets ever built for medical research slowly powered up last week. This fall, David J. Weber expects the magnet - at the core of the school's new 800 megahertz nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2013
Dr. Frederick L. Brancati, an internationally known expert on the epidemiology and prevention of type 2 diabetes who was director of the Division of General Internal Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, died Tuesday of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, at his Lutherville home. He was 53. "He was a delightful human being — smart, witty and fun to be around," said Dr. Michael J. Klag, dean of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, whom Dr. Brancati succeeded as division chief.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2013
Kaci DeWitt-Rickards remembers being a chunky kid with a steady diet of Burger King chicken tenders, vanilla milkshakes and Papa John's pizza. By her sophomore year in college at the University of Miami, her adolescent pudge had ballooned into a weight problem. The 5-foot-4 exercise physiology major hit her heaviest weight ever that fall in 2010, weighing in at 167 pounds. She felt bad about herself and didn't have a lot of energy. But most of all, she felt like a hypocrite as she studied for a career to help people stay fit. "If you're going to go out and teach a healthy lifestyle, you have to live it," DeWitt-Rickards remembers a professor saying that fall semester.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2013
The University of Maryland School of Medicine announced this week a $500 million fundraising goal — the Baltimore institution's largest campaign ever. Donors already have given $339 million during the quiet phase of the campaign, dubbed "Transforming Medicine Beyond Imagination. " The money will be used to advance research, fund top-notch training of doctors and devise ways to improve patient care, said Dean E. Albert Reece. Reece said institutions like his need to look more to private donors as government funds fail to keep pace with growth.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2013
Low libido can not only ruin a women's sex life but could also cause her to miss out on some key health benefits. Dr. Valerie Omicioli, a certified menopause practitioner and clinical assistant professor of obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive sciences at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, said that low sexual desire is something that women should not ignore. What are some of the common causes of low libido in women? The word libido refers not only to the desire for sex, but also sexual thoughts, fantasies, responsiveness and willingness to engage in sexual activity.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2013
Dr. William Dewey Blake, a retired University of Maryland School of Medicine professor who was chairman of the department of physiology, died of cancer Sunday at his Bath, Maine, home. The former Bolton Hill resident was 94. Born in Summit, N.J., and raised in New Haven, Conn., he was the son of Dr. Francis Blake, Yale University's department of medicine chairman who was also an internist. His mother, Dorothy Blake, was a homemaker. After graduating from the Hopkins Grammar School in New Haven, he earned a degree at Dartmouth College, where he was a member of Phi Beta Kappa.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2013
Dr. John M. Dennis, a nationally known radiologist and former dean of the University of Maryland School of Medicine, where his career spanned nearly half a century, died Thursday of respiratory failure at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. He was 89. "This is a very sad day for us," said Dr. E. Albert Reece, vice president for medical affairs for the University of Maryland and dean of the University of Maryland School of Medicine. "He was someone who spent many years at Maryland, and even in his retirement he continued to attend major events.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun Reporter | July 26, 2008
Dr. Sheldon Edward Greisman, a retired University of Maryland professor of medicine and physiology whose research focused on deadly sepsis infections, died of pneumonia July 19 at his Elkridge home. He was 80. A teacher at the University of Maryland School of Medicine for more than three decades, he was called "the father of endotoxin research" by fellow scientists. "Dr. Greisman was a shining star in the department of medicine at the University of Maryland," said Dr. Philip A. Mackowiak, a former student who is a University of Maryland department of medicine vice chairman and medical services chief at the downtown Veterans Administration Hospital.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | February 21, 2002
SALT LAKE CITY -- Brian Krabak's first patient at the athletes' clinic was a skier with a torn anterior cruciate ligament in his right knee, eager to get back on the slopes. Not much swelling, not much pain, fairly good mobility. Diagnosis? "I'd tell my patient, `You're psycho,' " Krabak says with a laugh. A brutal assessment, perhaps, but understandable given that the patient was the doctor himself. Krabak, 34, an assistant professor at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, is pulling shifts at the clinic at the Olympic Village, treating patients for everything from ligament tears to "reoccurring things, run-of-the-mill strains and contusions."
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2013
Dr. Ellen G. McDaniel, whose distinguished career in psychiatry spanned more than 40 years and influenced patients, medical students and even juries, died of lung cancer Thursday at her home in Highland. She was 71. The former Ellen Garb was raised in Cleveland and went off to college with thoughts of becoming a nurse. But her father encouraged her to train as a doctor, and she did — graduating from the University of Michigan Medical School as one of only seven women in the class of 1966, said her husband, John P. McDaniel.
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