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NEWS
By ASCRIBE NEWS SERVICE | December 28, 2000
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. - Gregory H. Olsen, president and CEO of Sensors Unlimited Inc., a fiber-optics firm based in Princeton, N.J., has pledged $15 million to the University of Virginia. Benefiting the department of materials science and engineering, where Olsen received a Ph.D. degree in 1971, the gift is the largest ever received by the university's school of engineering and applied science. The bequest will help an effort under way to expand engineering research activities at the university, particularly in the area of new materials.
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NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,Sun reporter | May 6, 2008
Construction magnate A. James Clark has pledged $10 million to endow the deanship of Johns Hopkins University's Whiting School of Engineering, his second $10 million gift to the private Baltimore college and the latest in his string of multimillion donations to Maryland schools. "This really is fabulous for the school," said Hopkins' engineering Dean Nicholas P. Jones. "The revenue generated from this commitment can be used to do exactly what any dean would love to do, and that is make investments in promising ideas and opportunities, whether in research or education."
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NEWS
March 4, 1991
Engineer,85Funeral services took place for former Pasadena resident Raymond Selmer Johnson on Friday, March 1, at Parkwood Cementery.Mr. Johnson, 85, died Feb. 25 at Mercy Hospital.He earned a graduate degree from the Johns Hopkins School of Engineering and worked as an engineer for the Baltimore Gas and Electric Co.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Sun reporter | November 25, 2007
Kristina Johnson has been a pioneer before. This time, it is becoming the highest-ranking woman in the history of the Johns Hopkins University. She took over as provost in September. In one way, she certainly came to the right place. That's because one of her previous pioneering efforts was when she entered Stanford University 32 years ago and helped establish the first women's team in - you guessed it - lacrosse. "I love sports," says Johnson, 50, a native of Denver. "I loved field hockey and I loved lacrosse.
NEWS
September 9, 1995
Yale University's ranking in this year's U.S. News & World Report evaluation of the nation's "best" national universities was incorrectly reported in some of yesterday's editions; Yale was tied for second with Princeton. Also, the Johns Hopkins University Whiting School of Engineering tied for 17th in a ranking of 50 engineering schools.The Sun regrets the errors.
FEATURES
December 23, 1990
The Rev. Charlotte Clemons, pastor of Shiloh African Methodist Episcopal Church, has been chosen to serve as a fellow to the Congress of National Black Churches.*Mark Saltzman, assistant professor of chemical engineering in the Johns Hopkins School of Engineering, was awarded a $50,000 Camille and Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award for 1990.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 31, 1999
Sydney C. Blumenthal Jr., chief executive officer of the Blumenthal-Kahn Electric Co. Inc. and local philanthropist, died of cancer Thursday at the Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care in Towson. He was 82.The longtime Pikesville resident had been CEO of the company for 37 years. One of the oldest electrical contracting firms in the nation, it was founded by his father, Sydney C. Blumenthal Sr., with partner Abraham Kahn in 1909.The company, now based in Owings Mills, was in the Blumenthal-Kahn Building at Liberty and Lombard streets until the early 1960s, when the building was demolished to make way for the Baltimore Arena.
NEWS
By Emeri B. O'Brien and Emeri B. O'Brien,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2005
When students enter the Clarence M. Mitchell Jr. School of Engineering at Morgan State University, they become part of a calculated mission. Since the fall of 1984, the department has had one leader, and his vision has been clear. "It has been our past tradition of providing access and opportunity for under-represented minorities," says Eugene DeLoatch, dean of the engineering department. The engineering program at Morgan has made great strides in increasing the number of African-Americans in the field.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 20, 2002
Morgan State University's School of Engineering has received a $6 million, five-year grant from NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center to establish a research center that will provide space missions with a technology base for the production of microwave components and systems, the university announced this week. Called the Center for Advanced Microwave Research and Applications, the program is part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's effort to encourage competitive aerospace research and technological capability among historically black colleges and universities, Morgan officials said.
NEWS
November 15, 2006
Rebecca L. Harding, a manager of information engineering for an Annapolis engineering company, died of cancer Sunday at University of Maryland Medical Center. The Severna Park resident was 44. She was born Rebecca Lee Himmelmann in Milwaukee and moved with her family to Cape St. Claire in 1974. She was a 1980 graduate of Severna Park High School and earned a bachelor's degree in computer science from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in 1985. She earned a master's degree in computer science from the Johns Hopkins University Whiting School of Engineering in 1997.
NEWS
June 24, 2007
Howard signs pact with Liberian system The Howard County public school system has signed a partnership agreement with the Monrovia consolidated school system in Liberia, West Africa. The partnership is intended to create an alliance to promote mutual understanding and common goals and establish a dialogue for possible cultural exchanges. The two school systems will explore opportunities to enhance their programs and build understanding of each nation's history and culture by exchanging personnel, information and other resources.
NEWS
November 15, 2006
Rebecca L. Harding, a manager of information engineering for an Annapolis engineering company, died of cancer Sunday at University of Maryland Medical Center. The Severna Park resident was 44. She was born Rebecca Lee Himmelmann in Milwaukee and moved with her family to Cape St. Claire in 1974. She was a 1980 graduate of Severna Park High School and earned a bachelor's degree in computer science from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in 1985. She earned a master's degree in computer science from the Johns Hopkins University Whiting School of Engineering in 1997.
NEWS
By Andrew G. Sherwood and Andrew G. Sherwood,SUN STAFF | June 19, 2005
Even before Harvard University President Lawrence H. Summers proposed that differences in the "intrinsic aptitudes" of men and women were the explanation for women's underrepresentation in the sciences, a plan to increase the number of female science and engineering students had been hatched by the Garrison Forest School and the Johns Hopkins University. Garrison Forest, an independent boarding and day school near Owings Mills, is partnering with Hopkins' Whiting School of Engineering and Zanvyl Krieger School of Arts and Sciences to bring high school girls into the science and engineering fields.
NEWS
June 5, 2005
Political, education and business leaders gathered at three events in the metropolitan area recently. Coppin State University's president, Dr. Stanley F. Battle, played host to several community leaders at one in a series of State of Black Baltimore Roundtable Summit discussions at the North Avenue campus. Martin's West in Woodlawn was the setting for two other popular affairs. The first was a banquet to honor the years of service of Morgan State University President Dr. Earl S. Richardson and to celebrate the School of Engineering's 20th anniversary.
NEWS
By Emeri B. O'Brien and Emeri B. O'Brien,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2005
When students enter the Clarence M. Mitchell Jr. School of Engineering at Morgan State University, they become part of a calculated mission. Since the fall of 1984, the department has had one leader, and his vision has been clear. "It has been our past tradition of providing access and opportunity for under-represented minorities," says Eugene DeLoatch, dean of the engineering department. The engineering program at Morgan has made great strides in increasing the number of African-Americans in the field.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2003
William P. Flanigan, a retired executive for a local contracting firm that built highways and other public works, died Sunday of a blood disease at his Homeland home. He was 86. In his long career in construction, Mr. Flanigan oversaw highway construction projects at Baltimore-Washington International Airport, the Baltimore Beltway and the Dundalk Marine Terminal. Born in Baltimore and raised in the city's West Arlington neighborhood, he attended the old Mount Washington Country School for Boys before graduating from Calvert Hall College High School in 1935.
BUSINESS
November 4, 1991
The School of Engineering at Johns Hopkins University has received a $75,000 grant from the General Electric Foundation for a program designed to increase the number of women and minorities pursuing academic and research careers in engineering and the physical sciences.Morgan State University will participate with Hopkins in the program, called "Faculty for the Future." Participants in the program, which will begin in January, will be chosen by a panel of Hopkins and Morgan engineering professors.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | May 7, 1998
The longtime chairman of art history has been appointed dean of arts and sciences at the Johns Hopkins University, assuming leadership of a school that has been troubled by the defection of distinguished faculty members.Herbert L. Kessler, the Charlotte Bloomberg professor of art history, was approved as dean of the Zanvyl Krieger School of Arts and Sciences during a telephone conference yesterday of the executive committee of the university's board of trustees.Kessler, 56, is the second new dean announced this week.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 20, 2002
Morgan State University's School of Engineering has received a $6 million, five-year grant from NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center to establish a research center that will provide space missions with a technology base for the production of microwave components and systems, the university announced this week. Called the Center for Advanced Microwave Research and Applications, the program is part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's effort to encourage competitive aerospace research and technological capability among historically black colleges and universities, Morgan officials said.
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