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By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,sun reporter | December 5, 2006
The Johns Hopkins University has received a $50 million gift that will establish separate business and education schools, university officials announced late yesterday. William Polk Carey, a trustee emeritus at Hopkins, is donating the money through his W.P. Carey Foundation. The gift is the largest to Hopkins in support of business education, the university said in a statement. The Carey Business School and the School of Education will begin operating Jan. 1, replacing the university's School of Professional Studies in Business and Education.
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NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2014
U.S. News and World Report ranked the Johns Hopkins University's School of Education No. 1 in the nation for graduate education programs, above two state programs better known as teaching schools: University of Maryland, College Park at No. 26 and Towson University at No. 116. The annual rankings of graduate schools in various disciplines is being released, and it gives the education program at Hopkins the top billing for the first time, up from...
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 23, 2001
Samuel W. Seidel, retired president and chief executive officer of Peninsula Insurance Co. who endowed Salisbury State University's school of education, died Wednesday of cancer at his Salisbury home. He was 78. Mr. Seidel founded the Sam Seidel Agency in 1952 and the Peninsula Insurance Co. in 1960. In 1978, he formed the Seidel Cos., which relatives said became the largest privately owned insurance operation in Maryland. After the company was sold in 1988, he remained president, CEO and chairman of the board until he retired in 1996.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2013
Johns Hopkins University alum and best-selling author Wes Moore will replace Dr. Ben Carson as speaker at the university's School of Education commencement, officials said Wednesday, after the world-renowned neurosurgeon came under fire for his political views on same-sex marriage. Carson stepped down this month as the commencement speaker for Hopkins' School of Education and School of Medicine, saying he did not want his recent controversies to become a distraction. The famed Hopkins surgeon - who has expressed an interest in politics when he retires in June - was criticized by students and faculty for comments he made on a conservative news show.
NEWS
By [Gina Davis] | March 18, 2007
Fenwick W. English Occupation Senior professor at the University of North Carolina School of Education at Chapel Hill; lead auditor with Phi Delta Kappa International, a nonprofit group that reviews curriculum management in school systems. in the news English led a team of auditors who analyzed Baltimore County schools and found that a lack of curriculum oversight and teacher training undermined academic progress. Among their major findings, auditors said that teachers are inundated with new programs but receive little guidance on how to use them and that many schools are in disrepair.
NEWS
July 27, 2009
ALEXANDER HEARD, 92 Education adviser for 3 presidents Alexander Heard, the chancellor of Vanderbilt University in the 1960s and 1970s and an education adviser under three U.S. presidents, died Friday. He was 92. The university said Heard died at home after a long illness. As head of the private university in Nashville, Tenn., Heard helped guide it through turbulent political conflicts that struck many other schools. He defended students who organized a slate of speakers that included Martin Luther King Jr. and Stokely Carmichael, a supporter of black power.
NEWS
September 8, 2005
EVER SINCE Eric J. Smith arrived in Anne Arundel County to become school superintendent in July 2002, he's had his ups and downs. The former schools chief in Charlotte-Mecklenburg, N.C., and Newport News, Va., among other places, Mr. Smith can boast of some good results during his Maryland tenure, as well as some controversy. From the start, he instituted changes that standardized curriculums, textbooks and schedules throughout the county. While some teachers appreciated the uniformity, others complained that the new rules stifled creativity.
NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN and KATE SHATZKIN,kate.shatzkin@baltsun.com | September 8, 2008
Today's Monday Consult question comes from a reader who was concerned about a lesson taught in her son's kindergarten classroom. Because she suspects the lesson plan comes from higher up in the school than her son's teacher, she was reluctant about taking it to the teacher. And she didn't want to be seen as one of those pushy "helicopter parents" when the school year has just begun. But our expert for today, Mariale Hardiman - former principal of Roland Park Elementary-Middle School and now assistant dean for urban school partnerships at the Johns Hopkins University School of Education, says it would be worse to leave the teacher out of the discussion.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Sun Reporter | November 18, 2007
Eileen McFarren's son catches on quickly, so he's sometimes asked to help teach his fourth-grade classmates when they don't understand. His mother wishes much more for him: a classroom where he is challenged every day. But his Severna Park elementary school doesn't have an extensive program for gifted children. Unlike most states, Maryland does not have regulations that require school districts to identify gifted students or provide them services. As a result, while some school systems have model gifted programs, others have done the minimum.
BUSINESS
January 22, 2009
Applicants rise for JHU nursing, education schools Applications to the Johns Hopkins University's schools of education and nursing are on the rise, according to school officials. For the six months that ended Dec. 31, applications for the School of Education rose 30 percent, while submissions for the School of Nursing climbed 11 percent compared with the period a year ago. Enterprise president to retire April 15 Columbia-based Enterprise Community Investment Inc., a provider of affordable housing finance, said yesterday that its president and chief executive, Jeffrey H. Donahue, will retire April 15. Donahue, 62, who had served as chief executive for six years, will be succeeded by Charles R. Werhane, the company's vice chairman and chief operating officer.
NEWS
July 27, 2009
ALEXANDER HEARD, 92 Education adviser for 3 presidents Alexander Heard, the chancellor of Vanderbilt University in the 1960s and 1970s and an education adviser under three U.S. presidents, died Friday. He was 92. The university said Heard died at home after a long illness. As head of the private university in Nashville, Tenn., Heard helped guide it through turbulent political conflicts that struck many other schools. He defended students who organized a slate of speakers that included Martin Luther King Jr. and Stokely Carmichael, a supporter of black power.
NEWS
February 21, 2009
Sara Neufeld's recent three-part profile of Baltimore Schools CEO Andr?s Alonso uses the frame of a single charismatic personality to turn much-needed attention to urban school systems' ongoing struggles to meet the educational needs of their most underserved students ("Andr?s Alonso," Feb. 8- Feb. 10). Throughout the series, she returns to perhaps the central reason why city schools in Baltimore - and in so many other urban centers nationwide - continue to languish: the perception that, as Ms. Neufeld writes, "things are as they always will be."
BUSINESS
January 22, 2009
Applicants rise for JHU nursing, education schools Applications to the Johns Hopkins University's schools of education and nursing are on the rise, according to school officials. For the six months that ended Dec. 31, applications for the School of Education rose 30 percent, while submissions for the School of Nursing climbed 11 percent compared with the period a year ago. Enterprise president to retire April 15 Columbia-based Enterprise Community Investment Inc., a provider of affordable housing finance, said yesterday that its president and chief executive, Jeffrey H. Donahue, will retire April 15. Donahue, 62, who had served as chief executive for six years, will be succeeded by Charles R. Werhane, the company's vice chairman and chief operating officer.
NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN and KATE SHATZKIN,kate.shatzkin@baltsun.com | September 8, 2008
Today's Monday Consult question comes from a reader who was concerned about a lesson taught in her son's kindergarten classroom. Because she suspects the lesson plan comes from higher up in the school than her son's teacher, she was reluctant about taking it to the teacher. And she didn't want to be seen as one of those pushy "helicopter parents" when the school year has just begun. But our expert for today, Mariale Hardiman - former principal of Roland Park Elementary-Middle School and now assistant dean for urban school partnerships at the Johns Hopkins University School of Education, says it would be worse to leave the teacher out of the discussion.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun Reporter | May 18, 2008
Thelma Cannady Rice, a retired veteran public school educator and 50-year member of her church, died of cancer Wednesday at her daughter's Woodlawn home. She was 101. Born Thelma E. Cannady in Hampton, Va., she was a member of a family associated with Hampton Normal College, now Hampton University. Family members said much of her childhood was spent on the school's campus, where her father ran a commissary and her mother had a guest house, the Holly Tree Inn. Mrs. Rice received her diploma from the School of Education at Hampton Normal College in 1927.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Sun Reporter | November 18, 2007
Eileen McFarren's son catches on quickly, so he's sometimes asked to help teach his fourth-grade classmates when they don't understand. His mother wishes much more for him: a classroom where he is challenged every day. But his Severna Park elementary school doesn't have an extensive program for gifted children. Unlike most states, Maryland does not have regulations that require school districts to identify gifted students or provide them services. As a result, while some school systems have model gifted programs, others have done the minimum.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun reporter | October 4, 2007
Rochelle "Shelley" Ingram, a teacher of teachers and former associate dean of the Johns Hopkins School of Education and director of its graduate education programs, died of a neurological disease Monday at her Owings Mills home. She was 59. Friends said that in her 35 years in the education field, Dr. Ingram strove to overcome ethnic and cultural differences, and ardently believed society must educate its young to achieve high levels of competence. "She wanted the very best teachers in the world for Maryland's children," said state schools Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick.
NEWS
February 21, 2009
Sara Neufeld's recent three-part profile of Baltimore Schools CEO Andr?s Alonso uses the frame of a single charismatic personality to turn much-needed attention to urban school systems' ongoing struggles to meet the educational needs of their most underserved students ("Andr?s Alonso," Feb. 8- Feb. 10). Throughout the series, she returns to perhaps the central reason why city schools in Baltimore - and in so many other urban centers nationwide - continue to languish: the perception that, as Ms. Neufeld writes, "things are as they always will be."
NEWS
November 4, 2007
An education expo will take place from 4 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Tuesday at the Higher Education and Conference Center at HEAT, 1201 Technology Drive, Route 22, Aberdeen. Visitors can learn about upper-level undergraduate and graduate degree programs, and preview spring classes and programs. Classes meet evenings and weekends at regional colleges and universities. Bachelor's degrees include business management, education, information technology and nursing. Master's degrees include applied information technology, biotechnology, education, engineering, homeland security, instructional technology and management.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun reporter | October 4, 2007
Rochelle "Shelley" Ingram, a teacher of teachers and former associate dean of the Johns Hopkins School of Education and director of its graduate education programs, died of a neurological disease Monday at her Owings Mills home. She was 59. Friends said that in her 35 years in the education field, Dr. Ingram strove to overcome ethnic and cultural differences, and ardently believed society must educate its young to achieve high levels of competence. "She wanted the very best teachers in the world for Maryland's children," said state schools Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick.
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